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Sökning: WFRF:(Arslan Alan A.)

  • Resultat 41-50 av 59
  • Föregående 1234[5]6Nästa
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41.
  • Clendenen, Tess V., et al. (författare)
  • Circulating prolactin levels and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer Netherlands. - 0957-5243 .- 1573-7225. ; 24:4, s. 741-748
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Indirect evidence from experimental and epidemiological studies suggests that prolactin may be involved in ovarian cancer development. However, the relationship between circulating prolactin levels and risk of ovarian cancer is unknown.</p><p>We conducted a nested case-control study of 230 cases and 432 individually matched controls within three prospective cohorts to evaluate whether pre-diagnostic circulating prolactin is associated with subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. We also assessed whether lifestyle and reproductive factors are associated with circulating prolactin among controls.</p><p>Prolactin levels were significantly lower among post- versus pre-menopausal women, parous versus nulliparous women, and past versus never users of oral contraceptives in our cross-sectional analysis of controls. In our nested case-control study, we observed a non-significant positive association between circulating prolactin and ovarian cancer risk (ORQ4vsQ1 1.56, 95 % CI 0.94, 2.63, p trend 0.15). Our findings were similar in multivariate-adjusted models and in the subgroup of women who donated blood a parts per thousand yen5 years prior to diagnosis. We observed a significant positive association between prolactin and risk for the subgroup of women with BMI a parts per thousand yen25 kg/m(2) (ORQ4vsQ1 3.10, 95 % CI 1.39, 6.90), but not for women with BMI &lt; 25 kg/m(2) (ORQ4vsQ1 0.81, 95 % CI 0.40, 1.64).</p><p>Our findings suggest that prolactin may be associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer, particularly in overweight/obese women. Factors associated with reduced risk of ovarian cancer, such as parity and use of oral contraceptives, were associated with lower prolactin levels, which suggests that modulation of prolactin may be a mechanism underlying their association with risk.</p>
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42.
  • Clendenen, Tess V, et al. (författare)
  • Factors associated with inflammation markers, a cross-sectional analysis
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Cytokine. - 1043-4666 .- 1096-0023. ; 56:3, s. 769-778
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Epidemiological studies have reported associations between circulating inflammation markers and risk of chronic diseases. It is of interest to examine whether risk factors for these diseases are associated with inflammation. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to evaluate whether reproductive and lifestyle factors and circulating vitamin D were associated with inflammation markers, including C-reactive protein, cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, TNFα), and cytokine modulators (IL-1RA, sIL-1RII, sIL-2Ra, sIL-4R, sIL-6R, sTNF-R1/R2), among 616 healthy women. We confirmed associations of several inflammation markers with age and BMI. We also observed significantly higher levels of certain inflammation markers in postmenopausal vs. premenopausal women (TNFα, sIL-1RII, sIL-2Ra), with increasing parity (IL-12p40), and with higher circulating 25(OH) vitamin D (IL-13) and lower levels among current users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12p70, and IL-12p40), current smokers (IL-4, IL-13, IL-12p40), and women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13). Our findings suggest that risk factors for chronic diseases (age, BMI, menopausal status, parity, NSAID use, family history of breast and ovarian cancer, and smoking) are associated with inflammation markers in healthy women.</p>
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43.
  • Clendenen, Tess V., et al. (författare)
  • Genetic Polymorphisms in Vitamin D Metabolism and Signaling Genes and Risk of Breast Cancer A Nested Case-Control Study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - 1932-6203 .- 1932-6203. ; 10:10
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D metabolism and signaling genes have been inconsistently associated with risk of breast cancer, though few studies have examined SNPs in vitamin D-related genes other than the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and particularly have not examined the association with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA) gene which may be a key vitamin D pathway gene. We conducted a nested case-control study of 734 cases and 1435 individually matched controls from a population-based prospective cohort study, the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort. Tag and functional SNPs were genotyped for the VDR, cytochrome p450 24A1 (CYP24A1), and RXRA genes. We also genotyped specific SNPs in four other genes related to vitamin D metabolism and signaling (GC/VDBP, CYP2R1, DHCR7, and CYP27B1). SNPs in the CYP2R1, DHCR7, and VDBP gene regions that were associated with circulating 25(OH) D concentration in GWAS were also associated with plasma 25(OH) D in our study (p-trend &lt; 0.005). After taking into account the false discovery rate, these SNPs were not significantly associated with breast cancer risk, nor were any of the other SNPs or haplotypes in VDR, RXRA, and CYP24A1. We observed no statistically significant associations between polymorphisms or haplotypes in key vitamin D-related genes and risk of breast cancer. These results, combined with the observation in this cohort and most other prospective studies of no association of circulating 25(OH) D with breast cancer risk, do not support an association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk.</p>
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44.
  • Clendenen, Tess V., et al. (författare)
  • Genetic Polymorphisms in Vitamin D Metabolism and Signaling Genes and Risk of Breast Cancer a nested case-control study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - PLOS one. - 1932-6203 .- 1932-6203. ; 10:10
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D metabolism and signaling genes have been inconsistently associated with risk of breast cancer, though few studies have examined SNPs in vitamin D-related genes other than the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and particularly have not examined the association with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA) gene which may be a key vitamin D pathway gene. We conducted a nested case-control study of 734 cases and 1435 individually matched controls from a population-based prospective cohort study, the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort. Tag and functional SNPs were genotyped for the VDR, cytochrome p450 24A1 (CYP24A1), and RXRA genes. We also genotyped specific SNPs in four other genes related to vitamin D metabolism and signaling (GC/VDBP, CYP2R1, DHCR7, and CYP27B1). SNPs in the CYP2R1, DHCR7, and VDBP gene regions that were associated with circulating 25(OH) D concentration in GWAS were also associated with plasma 25(OH) D in our study (p-trend &lt; 0.005). After taking into account the false discovery rate, these SNPs were not significantly associated with breast cancer risk, nor were any of the other SNPs or haplotypes in VDR, RXRA, and CYP24A1. We observed no statistically significant associations between polymorphisms or haplotypes in key vitamin D-related genes and risk of breast cancer. These results, combined with the observation in this cohort and most other prospective studies of no association of circulating 25(OH) D with breast cancer risk, do not support an association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk.</p>
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45.
  • Clendenen, Tess V, et al. (författare)
  • Temporal reliability of cytokines and growth factors in EDTA plasma
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: BMC research notes. - 1756-0500. ; 3:1, s. 302
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>BACKGROUND: Cytokines are involved in the development of chronic diseases, including cancer. It is important to evaluate the temporal reproducibility of cytokines in plasma prior to conducting epidemiologic studies utilizing these markers.</p> <p>FINDINGS: We assessed the temporal reliability of CRP, 22 cytokines and their soluble receptors (IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-1Ra, IL-2, sIL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, sIL-6R, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, TNFalpha, sTNF-R1, sTNF-R2, IFNalpha, IFNgamma) and eight growth factors (GM-CSF, EGF, bFGF, G-CSF, HGF, VEGF, EGFR, ErbB2) in repeated EDTA plasma samples collected an average of two years apart from 18 healthy women (age range: 42-62) enrolled in a prospective cohort study. We also estimated the correlation between serum and plasma biomarker levels using 18 paired clinical samples from postmenopausal women (age range: 75-86). Twenty-six assays were able to detect their analytes in at least 70% of samples. Of those 26 assays, we observed moderate to high intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs)(ranging from 0.53-0.89) for 22 assays, and low ICCs (0-0.47) for four assays. Serum and plasma levels were highly correlated (r &gt; 0.6) for most markers, except for seven assays (r &lt; 0.5).</p> <p>CONCLUSIONS: For 22 of the 31 biomarkers, a single plasma measurement is a reliable estimate of a woman's average level over a two-year period.</p>
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46.
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47.
  • Jacobs, Eric J, et al. (författare)
  • Family history of cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer : A pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan).
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - 0020-7136 .- 1097-0215.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e., ovarian, breast and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of 5 types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer [multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-2.61]. A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.12-1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.52-1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.51) or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.93-1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study.</p>
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48.
  • Lukanova, Annekatrin, et al. (författare)
  • Human chorionic gonadotropin and alpha-fetoprotein concentrations in pregnancy and maternal risk of breast cancer : a nested case-control study.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Epidemiology. - 0002-9262 .- 1476-6256. ; 168:11, s. 1284-1291
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Pregnancy hormones are believed to be involved in the protection against breast cancer conferred by pregnancy. The authors explored the association of maternal breast cancer with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). In 2001, a case-control study was nested within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort, an ongoing study in which blood samples have been collected from first-trimester pregnant women since 1975. Cases (n = 210) and controls (n = 357) were matched for age, parity, and date of blood donation. Concentrations of hCG and AFP were measured by immunoassay. No overall significant association of breast cancer with either hCG or AFP was observed. However, women with hCG levels in the top tertile tended to be at lower risk of breast cancer than women with hCG levels in the lowest tertile in the whole study population and in subgroups of age at sampling, parity, and age at cancer diagnosis. A borderline-significant decrease in risk with high hCG levels was observed in women who developed breast cancer after the median lag time to cancer diagnosis (&gt; or =14 years; odds ratio = 0.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.27, 1.03; P = 0.06). These findings, though very preliminary, are consistent with a possible long-term protective association of breast cancer risk with elevated levels of circulating hCG in the early stages of pregnancy.</p>
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49.
  • Lukanova, Annekatrin, et al. (författare)
  • Insulin-like growth factor I in pregnancy and maternal risk of breast cancer
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. - Baltimore : Waverly Press. - 1055-9965 .- 1538-7755. ; 15:12, s. 2489-2493
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: The role of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in breast cancer remains controversial, despite numerous reports on the association of the hormone with breast cancer or high-risk mammographic densities. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated IGF-I during early pregnancy, a period characterized by intense cell proliferation in the breasts and in the presence of high concentrations of sex steroids, will be associated with increased maternal risk to develop a breast malignancy.</p> <p>Methods: The Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort is an ongoing prospective study, collecting blood samples from first-trimester-pregnant women since 1975 as part of screening for infectious diseases. A case-control study (212 cases and 369 controls) was nested among Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort members who delivered singleton babies. RIA was used to measure IGF-I and IGF-II levels. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).</p> <p>Results: Breast cancer risk increased with increasing IGF-I (top tertile OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.7). The association was stronger among the primiparous (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.4) than in the nonprimiparous women (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7-2.8). Upper-tertile risks seemed to decrease within the &lt;28-, 28 to 33, and &gt;33-year groups of age at sampling, from 2.5 (0.9-7.6) to 2.1 (0.9-5.0) and 1.2 (0.5-2.5), respectively. There was no association of breast cancer with first-trimester-pregnancy IGF-II.</p> <p>Conclusions: The study offers further evidence that IGF-I is important in breast cancer. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of IGF-I on the breast may be stronger before the remodeling of the gland induced by a first pregnancy.</p>
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50.
  • Lukanova, Annekatrin, et al. (författare)
  • Prediagnostic levels of C-peptide, IGF-I, IGFBP -1, -2 and -3 and risk of endometrial cancer.
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - 0020-7136 .- 1097-0215. ; 108:2, s. 262-268
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Conditions related to chronic hyperinsulinemia, such as obesity, noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus and polycystic ovary syndrome, are associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Elevated plasma IGF-I and decreased levels of IGF-binding proteins have been shown to be associated with increased risk of several cancer types that are frequent in affluent societies. We investigated for the first time in a prospective study the association of pre-diagnostic blood concentrations of C-peptide (a marker of pancreatic insulin production), IGF-I, IGFBP-1, -2 and -3 with endometrial cancer risk. A case-control study was nested within 3 cohorts in New York (USA), Umeå (Sweden) and Milan (Italy). It included 166 women with primary invasive endometrial cancer and 315 matched controls, of which 44 case and 78 control subjects were premenopausal at recruitment. Endometrial cancer risk increased with increasing levels of C-peptide (<em>p</em><sub>trend</sub> = 0.0002), up to an odds ratio (OR) of 4.76 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.91-11.8] for the highest quintile. This association remained after adjustment for BMI and other confounders [OR for the top quintile = 4.40 (1.65-11.7)]. IGFBP-1 levels were inversely related to endometrial cancer [<em>p</em><sub>trend</sub> = 0.002; OR in the upper quintile = 0.30 (0.15-0.62)], but the association was weakened and lost statistical significance after adjustment for confounders [<em>p</em><sub>trend</sub> = 0.06; OR in the upper quintile = 0.49 (0.22-1.07)]. Risk was unrelated to levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3. Chronic hyperinsulinemia, as reflected by increased circulating C-peptide, is associated with increased endometrial cancer risk. Decrease in the prevalence of chronic hyperinsulinemia, through changes in lifestyle or medication, is expected to prevent endometrial cancer.</p>
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