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Sökning: WFRF:(Nienaber Christoph A.)

  • Resultat 11-14 av 14
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11.
  • Jander, Nikolaus, et al. (författare)
  • Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Heart. - : BMJ Publishing Group. - 1355-6037 .- 1468-201X. ; 100:1, s. 28-33
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVA(index)). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are <1.0cm(2) for AVA and <0.6cm(2)/m(2) for AVA(index). Objective To investigate the influence of indexation on the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis and on the predictive accuracy regarding clinical outcome. Methods Echocardiographic and anthropometric data from a retrospective cohort of 2843 patients with aortic stenosis (jet velocity >2.5m/s) and from 1525 patients prospectively followed in the simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS) trial were analysed. Results The prevalence of severe stenosis increased with the AVA(index) criterion compared to AVA from 71% to 80% in the retrospective cohort, and from 29% to 44% in SEAS (both p<0.001). Overall, the predictive accuracy for aortic valve events was virtually identical for AVA and AVA(index) in the SEAS population (mean follow-up of 46months; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.70) vs 0.68 (CI 0.65 to 0.71) (NS). However, 213 patients additionally categorised as severe by AVA(index) experienced significantly less valve related events than those fulfilling only the AVA criterion (p<0.001). Conclusions Indexing AVA by BSA (AVA(index)) significantly increases the prevalence of patients with criteria for severe stenosis by including patients with a milder degree of the disease without improving the predictive accuracy for aortic valve related events.
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12.
  • Jander, Nikolaus, et al. (författare)
  • Outcome of Patients With Low-Gradient "Severe" Aortic Stenosis and Preserved Ejection Fraction
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Circulation. - : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. - 1524-4539 .- 0009-7322. ; 123:8, s. 887-895
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background-Retrospective studies have suggested that patients with a low transvalvular gradient in the presence of an aortic valve area <1.0 cm(2) and normal ejection fraction may represent a subgroup with an advanced stage of aortic valve disease, reduced stroke volume, and poor prognosis requiring early surgery. We therefore evaluated the outcome of patients with low-gradient "severe" stenosis (defined as aortic valve area < 1.0 cm(2) and mean gradient <= 40 mm Hg) in the prospective Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Methods and Results-Outcome in patients with low-gradient "severe" aortic stenosis was compared with outcome in patients with moderate stenosis (aortic valve area 1.0 to 1.5 cm(2); mean gradient 25 to 40 mm Hg). The primary end point of aortic valve events included death from cardiovascular causes, aortic valve replacement, and heart failure due to aortic stenosis. Secondary end points were major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. In 1525 asymptomatic patients (mean age, 67 +/- 10 years; ejection fraction, >= 55%), baseline echocardiography revealed low-gradient severe stenosis in 435 patients (29%) and moderate stenosis in 184 (12%). Left ventricular mass was lower in patients with low-gradient severe stenosis than in those with moderate stenosis (182 +/- 64 versus 212 +/- 68 g; P < 0.01). During 46 months of follow-up, aortic valve events occurred in 48.5% versus 44.6%, respectively (P=0.37; major cardiovascular events, 50.9% versus 48.5%, P=0.58; cardiovascular death, 7.8% versus 4.9%, P=0.19). Low-gradient severe stenosis patients with reduced stroke volume index (<= 35 mL/m(2); n=223) had aortic valve events comparable to those in patients with normal stroke volume index (46.2% versus 50.9%; P=0.53). Conclusions-Patients with low-gradient "severe" aortic stenosis and normal ejection fraction have an outcome similar to that in patients with moderate stenosis. (Circulation. 2011;123:887-895.)
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14.
  • Nielsen, Olav W., et al. (författare)
  • Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis The Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study (SEAS)
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Circulation. - 0009-7322 .- 1524-4539. ; 134:6, s. 455-468
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. METHODS: A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease were analyzed. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement. BP was analyzed in Cox models as the cumulative average of serially measured BP and a time-varying covariate. RESULTS: The incidence of all-cause mortality was highest for average follow-up systolic BP >= 160 mm Hg (4.3 per 100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-6.0) and lowest for average systolic BP of 120 to 139 mm Hg (2.0 per 100 person-years; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6). In multivariable analysis, all-cause mortality was associated with average systolic BP < 120 mm Hg (hazard ratio [HR], 3.4; 95% CI, 1.9-6.1), diastolic BP >= 90 mm Hg (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9), and pulse pressure < 50 mm Hg (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9), with systolic BP of 120 to 139 mm Hg, diastolic BP of 70 to 79 mm Hg, and pulse pressure of 60 to 69 mm Hg taken as reference. Low systolic and diastolic BPs increased risk in patients with moderate aortic stenosis. With a time-varying systolic BP from 130 to 139 mm Hg used as reference, mortality was increased for systolic BP >= 160 mm Hg (HR, 1.7; P=0.033) and BP of 120 to 129 mm Hg (HR, 1.6; P= 0.039). CONCLUSIONS: Optimal BP seems to be systolic BP of 130 to 139 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 70 to 90 mm Hg in these patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease or diabetes mellitus.
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  • Resultat 11-14 av 14
  • Föregående 1[2]

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