SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Noethlings Ute) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Noethlings Ute)

  • Resultat 21-25 av 25
  • Föregående 12[3]
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
21.
  • Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra, et al. (författare)
  • Plasma phospholipid fatty acid profiles and their association with food intakes: results from a cross-sectional study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. - : Oxford University Press. - 1938-3207. ; 89:1, s. 331-46
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Plasma phospholipid fatty acids have been correlated with food intakes in populations with homogeneous dietary patterns. However, few data are available on populations with heterogeneous dietary patterns. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of dietary intakes across populations involved in a large European multicenter study. Design: A cross-sectional study design nested to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) was conducted to determine plasma fatty acid profiles in > 3000 subjects from 16 centers, who had also completed 24-h dietary recalls and dietary questionnaires. Plasma fatty acids were assessed by capillary gas chromatography. Ecological and individual correlations were calculated between fatty acids and select food groups. Results: The most important determinant of plasma fatty acids was region, which suggests that the variations across regions are largely due to different food intakes. Strong ecological correlations were observed between fish intake and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = 0.78, P < 0.01), olive oil and oleic acid (r = 0.73, P < 0.01), and margarine and elaidic acid (r = 0.76, P < 0.01). Individual correlations varied across the regions, particularly between olive oil and oleic acid and between alcohol and the saturation index, as an indicator of stearoyl CoA desaturase activity. Conclusions: These findings indicate that specific plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of some food intakes in the EPIC Study. Moreover, these findings suggest complex interactions between alcohol intake and fatty acid metabolism, which warrants further attention in epidemiologic studies relating dietary fatty acids to alcohol-related cancers and other chronic diseases. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89: 331-46.
  •  
22.
  • Siegert, Sabine, et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide investigation of gene-environment interactions in colorectal cancer
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Human Genetics. - : Springer. - 1432-1203. ; 132:2, s. 219-231
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most frequent neoplasias worldwide, has both genetic and environmental causes. As yet, however, gene-environment (G x E) interactions in CRC have been studied mostly for a small number of candidate genes only. Therefore, we investigated the possible interaction, in CRC etiology, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the one hand, and overweight, smoking and alcohol consumption on the other, at a genome-wide level. To this end, we adopted a two-tiered approach comprising a case-only screening stage I (314 cases) and a case-control validation stage II (259 cases, 1,002 controls). Interactions with the smallest p value in stage I were verified in stage II using multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex and age. In addition, we specifically studied known CRC-associated SNPs for possible G x E interactions. Upon adjustment for sex and age, and after allowing for multiple testing, however, only a single SNP (rs1944511) was found to be involved in a statistically significant interaction, namely with overweight (multiplicity-corrected p = 0.042 in stage II). Several other G x E interactions were nominally significant but failed correction for multiple testing, including a previously reported interaction between rs9929218 and alcohol consumption that also emerged in our candidate SNP study (nominal p = 0.008). Notably, none of the interactions identified in our genome-wide analysis was with a previously reported CRC-associated SNP. Our study therefore highlights the potential of an "agnostic" genome-wide approach to G x E analysis.
  •  
23.
  • Sluik, Diewertje, et al. (författare)
  • HbA(1c) Measured in Stored Erythrocytes Is Positively Linearly Associated with Mortality in Individuals with Diabetes Mellitus
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - : Public Library of Science. - 1932-6203. ; 7:6
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Introduction: Observational studies have shown that glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) is related to mortality, but the shape of the association is less clear. Furthermore, disease duration and medication may modify this association. This observational study explored the association between HbA(1c) measured in stored erythrocytes and mortality. Secondly, it was assessed whether disease duration and medication use influenced the estimates or were independently associated with mortality. Methods: Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition a cohort was analysed of 4,345 individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of diabetes at enrolment. HbA(1c) was measured in blood samples stored up to 19 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models for all-cause mortality investigated HbA(1c) in quartiles as well as per 1% increment, diabetes medication in seven categories of insulin and oral hypoglycaemic agents, and disease duration in quartiles. Results: After a median follow-up of 9.3 years, 460 participants died. Higher HbA(1c) was associated with higher mortality: Hazard Ratio for 1%-increase was 1.11 (95% CI 1.06, 1.17). This association was linear (P-nonlinearity = 0.15) and persistent across categories of medication use, disease duration, and co-morbidities. Compared with metformin, other medication types were not associated with mortality. Longer disease duration was associated with mortality, but not after adjustment for HbA(1c) and medication. Conclusion: This prospective study showed that persons with lower HbA(1c) had better survival than those with higher HbA(1c). The association was linear and independent of disease duration, type of medication use, and presence of co-morbidities. Any improvement of HbA(1c) appears to be associated with reduced mortality risk.
  •  
24.
  • Sluik, Diewertje, et al. (författare)
  • Lifestyle factors and mortality risk in individuals with diabetes mellitus: are the associations different from those in individuals without diabetes?
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Diabetologia. - : Springer. - 1432-0428 .- 0012-186X. ; 57:1, s. 63-72
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims/hypothesis Thus far, it is unclear whether lifestyle recommendations for people with diabetes should be different from those for the general public. We investigated whether the associations between lifestyle factors and mortality risk differ between individuals with and without diabetes. Methods Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort was formed of 6,384 persons with diabetes and 258,911 EPIC participants without known diabetes. Joint Cox proportional hazard regression models of people with and without diabetes were built for the following lifestyle factors in relation to overall mortality risk: BMI, waist/height ratio, 26 food groups, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking. Likelihood ratio tests for heterogeneity assessed statistical differences in regression coefficients. Results Multivariable adjusted mortality risk among individuals with diabetes compared with those without was increased, with an HR of 1.62 (95% CI 1.51, 1.75). Intake of fruit, legumes, nuts, seeds, pasta, poultry and vegetable oil was related to a lower mortality risk, and intake of butter and margarine was related to an increased mortality risk. These associations were significantly different in magnitude from those in diabetes-free individuals, but directions were similar. No differences between people with and without diabetes were detected for the other lifestyle factors. Conclusions/interpretation Diabetes status did not substantially influence the associations between lifestyle and mortality risk. People with diabetes may benefit more from a healthy diet, but the directions of association were similar. Thus, our study suggests that lifestyle advice with respect to mortality for patients with diabetes should not differ from recommendations for the general population.
  •  
25.
  • Wennberg, Patrik, et al. (författare)
  • Self-rated health and mortality in individuals with diabetes mellitus: prospective cohort study
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: BMJ Open. - : BMJ Publishing Group. - 2044-6055. ; 2:1, s. 000760-000760
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objectives: To investigate whether low self-rated health (SRH) is associated with increased mortality in individuals with diabetes. Design: Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting: Enrolment took place between 1992 and 2000 in four centres (Bilthoven, Heidelberg, Potsdam, Umea) in a subcohort nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Participants: 3257 individuals (mean +/- SD age was 55.8 +/- 7.6 years and 42% women) with confirmed diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Primary outcome measure: The authors used Cox proportional hazards modelling to estimate HRs for total mortality controlling for age, centre, sex, educational level, body mass index, physical inactivity, smoking, insulin treatment, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and history of myocardial infarction, stroke or cancer. Results: During follow-up (mean follow-up +/- SD was 8.6 +/- 2.3 years), 344 deaths (241 men/103 women) occurred. In a multivariate model, individuals with low SRH were at higher risk of mortality (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.73) than those with high SRH. The association was mainly driven by increased 5-year mortality and was stronger among individuals with body mass index of <25 kg/m(2) than among obese individuals. In sex-specific analyses, the association was statistically significant in men only. There was no indication of heterogeneity across centres. Conclusions: Low SRH was associated with increased mortality in individuals with diabetes after controlling for established risk factors. In patients with diabetes with low SRH, the physician should consider a more detailed consultation and intensified support.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 21-25 av 25
  • Föregående 12[3]
 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy