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Sökning: WFRF:(Selvefors Anneli 1983)

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  • Föregående 1[2]3Nästa
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11.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Benefits and Difficulties for Industry when Designing for Sustainable Behaviour
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of Sustainable Innovation 2012, Towards Sustainable Product Design: 17th International Conference. 29-30 October 2012, Alanus University, Bonn, Germany. ; , s. 242-249
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The research field of Design for Sustainable Behaviour (DfSB) suggests strategies for promoting more sustainable use of products. The DfSB methodology thus provides opportunities for companies to further reduce their products’ environmental impact and differentiate on the market, still DfSB is not yet systematically applied in industry. This paper highlights benefits and difficulties that companies face when applying design strategies for sustainable behaviour in the product development process. A master thesis project at Electrolux is used as a basis for discussion. In summary, besides the environmental gains, DfSB can spur innovations that fit users’ implicit needs and thus create potential for increased profitability. Nevertheless, companies need to extend their competence within DfSB and methodologies that facilitate the implementation of DfSB in companies’ current product development processes should be developed.
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12.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Conflicts in Everyday Life: The Influence of Competing Goals on Domestic Energy Conservation
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Sustainability. - 2071-1050. ; 7:5, s. 5963-5980
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A common approach for understanding people’s domestic energy behavior is to study the influence of deterministic factors, such as attitudes, norms and knowledge, on behavior. However, few studies have succeeded in fully explaining people’s behavior based on these factors alone. To further the understanding of people’s everyday energy use, a goal-oriented approach based on activity theory has been applied to discuss energy conservation from a multiple goal perspective based on the findings from an interview study with 42 informants. The findings show that the informants used energy to fulfill goals linked to basic needs or desires related to their well-being. Even though the majority of informants had an explicit goal to reduce their energy consumption, many experienced conflicts with other competing goals, which often made energy conservation undesirable or challenging. The findings suggest that actions to reduce energy use will most often not be prioritized if they cannot be integrated into people’s daily life without jeopardizing their possibilities to achieve their primary goals and satisfy their everyday needs. It is thus vital to consider people’s everyday life and the many conflicts they experience when aiming to understand why people do, or do not, prioritize energy conservation during everyday activities.
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13.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983 (författare)
  • Design Beyond Interventions – Supporting Less Energy-reliant Activities in the Everyday
  • 2017
  • Doktorsavhandling (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • This thesis addresses challenges and opportunities for product design to contribute to domestic energy conservation. The overall aim of the thesis is that of increasing the understanding of people’s energy use and their use of energy-reliant artefacts in the everyday in order to propose ways of supporting energy conservation through design. Two main themes are explored within its scope: how people’s doings in everyday life influence energy use and how energy-reliant artefacts designed to support energy conservation influence energy use. Material from four empirical studies has been used to address the themes and discuss implications for design practice. Study A investigated how people’s possession and use of appliances influenced energy use and Study B explored people’s energy use and approach to energy conservation from the perspective of everyday activities. Studies C and D investigated how artefacts designed to support energy conservation may influence energy use through evaluations of an energy feedback system and kitchen appliances designed to mediate less energy-intensive use, respectively. A cross-study analysis shows that people’s energy use is embedded in the web of activities that make up everyday life and suggests that the design of energy-reliant artefacts mediates the actions and outcomes of those activities. Depending on their overall design, design characteristics, and their fit with the activity that is enabled, energy-reliant artefacts may either facilitate energy conservation or make less energy-intensive use challenging or undesirable. For instance, if artefacts are not easily understandable and easy to use, and if they do not provide suitable functions that enable people to use them effectively for a particular purpose, they risk being rejected or used in an energy-intensive way. The findings thus suggest that artefacts designed with one or more functions aimed to motivate or encourage people to reduce their energy use, commonly referred to as design interventions in literature, risk impeding energy conservation if they do not support energy conservation as a whole. To increase the potential for artefacts to support energy conservation, it is crucial to design suitable and relevant artefacts that provide for less energy-reliant everyday activities and that make it possible and desirable for people to meet their needs and attain their goals in less energy-intensive ways. If less energy-intensive use is only encouraged, but is not enabled and mediated, it will be difficult for people that do not have the preconditions to use less energy to actually reduce their energy use. This thesis therefore argues for moving beyond design interventions and instead designing for less energy-reliant activities by holistically considering the preconditions and design characteristics that functions on all layers of design may give rise to. Such an approach has the potential to reduce mismatches between the design of an artefact and the activity enabled, which in turn may increase the potential for artefacts to be used in less-energy-intensive ways and be adopted long term. In conclusion, the thesis provides new insights into the way in which people’s activities and use of artefacts influence energy use and highlights opportunities for design practitioners to create preconditions for less energy-reliant activities in the everyday.
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14.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Design for Sustainable Behaviour: A Toolbox for Targeting the Use Phase
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Eco-design tool conference, May 14-15 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden.
  • Konferensbidrag (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Several studies have concluded that the use phase, including people’s use behaviour, is a large contributor to the environmental impact of many products. Some eco-design tools mention the use phase as a possible target area, but there is a lack of methods that specifically address how to lower its environmental impact. Thus, this contribution presents a toolbox that enables companies to influence user behaviour to reduce the negative environmental impact during the use phase; we call this the Design for Sustainable Behaviour (DfSB) toolbox. The main tool in the toolbox comprises five types of strategies for the design of products and services. Enlighten strategies influence users’ knowledge, values, attitudes and norms, e.g. an eco-driving support system. Spur strategies encourage users to perform sustainable behaviours, e.g. through external rewards, punishments or competitions. Steer strategies guide users by making sustainable behaviour the evident choice, physically or cognitively, e.g. a refrigerator steering the placement of food to optimize preservation. Force strategies compel a sustainable behaviour upon the users, e.g. a washing machine that automatically adds the right amount of detergent. Match strategies adapt products and services to users’ current behaviours, e.g. start–stop systems in cars. A comparative study of different types of strategies shows that they have the potential to be effective in influencing users’ behaviour and to be accepted by consumers. The toolbox is utilized by employing its main tool and supporting tools (e.g. user studies and personas) in a design process focusing on users and their behaviour. This may mean a shift of eco-design efforts from later to earlier stages of the development process, which enables greater opportunities for radical environmental gain through design, as it is in the early stages that the environmental impact of products is largely determined. Different tools from the toolbox have been applied in a number of R&D cases in industry. For instance, Eliq Online, a home energy management system verified to support energy reductions have been developed by Exibea, and novel product concepts to reduce household’s energy use and to avoid food waste have been developed for IKEA and Electrolux. Apart from the evident advantage of encouraging sustainable behaviours, and thus reducing resource use, the DfSB toolbox can also spur innovation and provide a way to differentiate on saturated markets.
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15.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Design for Sustainable Consumption Behaviour - Systematising the use of Behavioural Intervention Strategies
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of DPPI 11, the 5th conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces. 22-25 June 2011, Milan. ; , s. 19-26
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • It has been well debated if user centred design, UCD, canactually lead to innovation. This paper discusses the case of sustainable innovation, specifically addressing the development of solutions to influence users’ resource consumption behaviour. The approach presented, suggests how knowledge on user actions and habits in a resource consumption situation can be used in the product development process in combination with systematised behavioural intervention strategies to facilitate the creation of innovative solutions aiming to motivate resourceefficient everyday actions. The Design for Sustainable Consumption Behaviour-approach, defined through a combination of UCD-methodology, studies of user consumption behaviour and categorised behavioural intervention strategies, explores how systematised knowledgewithin the domains can be applicable in an industry context to stimulate innovative solutions supporting actions for a decreased consumption of resources. The DSCB-approach can be regarded as an exploratory tool, which has the potential to help companies to integrate a behavioural perspective within their existing product development processes by providing guidance and an overview of available intervention strategies. To illustrate the use of the approach and conduct a first evaluation of the applicability, this paper reports on an explanatory case study carried out at IKEA of Sweden. The innovative results and outcomes of the case study suggest that the approach haspotential to bring forth sustainable innovations. However, the presented approach should be developed further and tested through additional research before further conclusions can be drawn.
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16.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Designed to support or impede energy conservation? How design characteristics influence people’s energy use
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Journal of Design Research. - 1569-1551 .- 1748-3050. ; 15:1, s. 43-61
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • This paper explores how the design of domestic appliances influences people’s energy use during everyday activities. Drawing on findings from an interview study with 81 informants, a variety of design characteristics were uncovered, which set preconditions for use that in different ways impede or support energy conservation. The identified characteristics did not only concern appliances’ operative functions but also their interactive and communicative functions as well as people’s underlying motives for using specific appliances. Addressing the full range of characteristics during the development of new appliances will highlight a variety of design opportunities and increase the possibilities for developing appliances that support people to go about their everyday activities in less energy-reliant ways.
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19.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • (How) Can Appliances be Designed to Support Less Energy-Intensive Use? Insights from a Field Study on Kitchen Appliances
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Design. - 1994-036X .- 1991-3761. ; 12:3, s. 35-55
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • This paper presents findings from a study carried out to contribute to the growing knowledge base within the Design for Sustainable Behaviour research field. Coffee makers, electric kettles and toasters were evaluated to explore if and why particular appliances may mediate less energy-intensive use to a greater extent than others. Eighteen participants used three appliances of the same type for two weeks each, during which the participants’ use of the appliances and the resulting energy use were monitored. In addition, semi-structured interviews and online surveys were conducted to explore how the appliances’ functions and overall design influenced energy use. The findings show that both specific functions and the design as a whole form the design characteristics that set preconditions for energy use. The study thus suggests that if appliances are not designed to support energy conservation holistically, there is a risk that aspects that have not been addressed will lead to more energy-intensive use. This makes it essential for designers to consider the full variety of characteristics influencing energy use. Based on the findings, design opportunities were identified and design guidelines formulated. The insights gained highlight new opportunities for design practice that can aid designers in designing for less energy-intensive use.
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20.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Re-framing Product Circularity from a User Perspective
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of DRS 2018 International Conference: Catalyst. - 2398-3132. - 9781912294206 ; 5, s. 2046-2057
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Much of the discussion regarding product circularity is framed from a production and business perspective. This paper argues that the current narrative needs to be complemented with a re-framing of circularity from a user perspective and that issues of consumption should be considered in more depth. Such a re-framing is proposed based on an exploration of the consumption process and a discussion regarding what different paths of consumption may entail for people. The paper also delves into the process of product exchange between multiple users over time. It underlines that products can be designed so that they can be transferred in tight loops from one user to another, i.e. from Use2Use, which typically entails environmental advantages in relation to circular production initiatives. Overall, such a perspective suggests an enabling approach, i.e. designing products and services that create preconditions that enable people to circulate products. New opportunities for supporting product circularity from a design perspective are suggested followed by recommendations for future work.
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