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Sökning: WFRF:(Zheng Lilly S)

  • Resultat 21-30 av 42
  • Föregående 12[3]45Nästa
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21.
  • Hsu, Fang-Chi, et al. (författare)
  • A novel prostate cancer susceptibility locus at 19q13.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer research. - 1538-7445. ; 69:7, s. 2720-3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 150 regions across the genome that may be associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk. We filtered these results to identify 43 independent SNPs where the frequency of the risk allele was consistently higher in cases than in controls in each of the five CGEMS study populations. Genotype information for 22 of these 43 SNPs was obtained either directly by genotyping or indirectly by imputation in our PCa GWAS of 500 cases and 500 controls selected from a population-based case-control study in Sweden [Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS)]. Two of these 22 SNPs were significantly associated with PCa risk (P<0.05). We then genotyped these two SNPs in the remaining cases (n=2,393) and controls (n=1,222) from CAPS and found that rs887391 at 19q13 was highly associated with PCa risk (P=9.4 x 10(-4)). A similar trend of association was found for this SNP in a case-control study from Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH), albeit the result was not statistically significant. Altogether, the frequency of the risk allele of rs887391 was consistently higher in cases than controls among each of seven study populations examined, with an overall P=3.2 x 10(-7) from a combined allelic test. A fine-mapping study in a 110-kb region at 19q13 among CAPS and JHH study populations revealed that rs887391 was the most strongly associated SNP in the region. Additional confirmation studies of this region are warranted.
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22.
  • Jin, Guangfu, et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Loci at ATF7IP and KLK2 Associated with Percentage of Circulating Free PSA
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Neoplasia. - : Neoplasia Press. - 1522-8002. ; 15:1, s. 95-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Percentage of free-to-total prostate-specific antigen (%fPSA) is an independent predictor of risk for prostate cancer among men with modestly elevated level of total PSA (tPSA) in blood. Physiological and pathological factors have been shown to influence the %fPSA value and diagnostic accuracy. MATERIALS/METHODS: To evaluate genetic determinants of %fPSA, we conducted a genome-wide association study of serum %fPSA by genotyping 642,584 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3192 men of European ancestry, each with a tPSA level of 2.5 to 10 ng/ml, that were recruited in the REduction by DUtasteride of Prostate Cancer Events study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with P < 10(-5) were further evaluated among the controls of a population-based case-control study in Sweden (2899 prostate cancer cases and 1722 male controls), including 464 controls having tPSA levels of 2.5 to 10 ng/ml. RESULTS: We identified two loci that were associated with %fPSA at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 x 10(-8)). The first associated SNP was rs3213764 (P = 6.45 x 10(-10)), a nonsynonymous variant (K530R) in the ATF7IP gene at 12p13. This variant was also nominally associated with tPSA (P = .015). The second locus was rs1354774 (P = 1.25 x 10(-12)), near KLK2 at 19q13, which was not associated with tPSA levels, and is separate from the rs17632542 locus at KLK3 that was previously associated with tPSA levels and prostate cancer risk. Neither rs3213764 nor rs1354774 was associated with prostate cancer risk or aggressiveness. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that genetic variants at ATF7IP and KLK2 contribute to the variance of %fPSA.
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23.
  • Jin, Guangfu, et al. (författare)
  • Validation of prostate cancer risk-related loci identified from genome-wide association studies using family-based association analysis : evidence from the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG)
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Human Genetics. - 0340-6717 .- 1432-1203. ; 131:7, s. 1095-1103
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Multiple prostate cancer (PCa) risk-related loci have been discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on case-control designs. However, GWAS findings may be confounded by population stratification if cases and controls are inadvertently drawn from different genetic backgrounds. In addition, since these loci were identified in cases with predominantly sporadic disease, little is known about their relationships with hereditary prostate cancer (HPC). The association between seventeen reported PCa susceptibility loci was evaluated with a family-based association test using 1,979 hereditary PCa families of European descent collected by members of the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics, with a total of 5,730 affected men. The risk alleles for 8 of the 17 loci were significantly over-transmitted from parents to affected offspring, including SNPs residing in 8q24 (regions 1, 2 and 3), 10q11, 11q13, 17q12 (region 1), 17q24 and Xp11. In subgroup analyses, three loci, at 8q24 (regions 1 and 2) plus 17q12, were significantly over-transmitted in hereditary PCa families with five or more affected members, while loci at 3p12, 8q24 (region 2), 11q13, 17q12 (region 1), 17q24 and Xp11 were significantly over-transmitted in HPC families with an average age of diagnosis at 65 years or less. Our results indicate that at least a subset of PCa risk-related loci identified by case-control GWAS are also associated with disease risk in HPC families.
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24.
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25.
  • Lindstrom, Sara, et al. (författare)
  • Inherited variation in hormone-regulating genes and prostate cancer survival
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Clinical Cancer Research. - Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci Oncol, SE-90185 Umea, Sweden. Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci Urol & Androl, Umea, Sweden. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Wake Forest Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Human Genom, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA. : AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. - 1078-0432 .- 1557-3265. ; 13:17, s. 5156-5161
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Purpose: Hormonal manipulation is the mainstay treatment of prostate cancer, notably in advanced stages. Despite initial favorably response, the cancer eventually develops hormone resistance resulting in disease progression and death. However, little is known about genetic determinants of disease progression and prostate cancer-specific death. Experimental Design: We analyzed a population-based cohort comprising 2,761 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from March 2001 to October 2003 and with complete follow-up through July 2006. During a median follow-up time of 3.8 years, a total of 300 men had died from prostate cancer. We genotyped 23 haplotype tagging single nucleoticle polymorphisms in the genes AR, CYP17, and SRD5A2 and used Cox proportional hazards analyses to quantify associations between genotype and risk of dying from prostate cancer. Results: The variant 'A': allele of an AR promoter single nucleoticle polymorphism, rs17302090, was borderline associated with a 50% increased risk of dying from prostate cancer (95% confidence interval, 1.0-2.3; P = 0.07). This finding was more pronounced in patients who received hormonal therapy as primary treatment at diagnosis (hazard ratio, 19; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.9; P = 0.007). We did not identify any associations between CYP17 or SRD5A2 variation and prostate cancer-specific death. Conclusions: Our results suggest that inherited genetic variation in the androgen receptor gene affects hormonal treatment response and ultimately prostate cancer death.
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26.
  • Liu, Wennuan, et al. (författare)
  • Association of a germ-line copy number variation at 2p24.3 and risk for aggressive prostate cancer.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer research. - 1538-7445. ; 69:6, s. 2176-9
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We searched for deletions in the germ-line genome among 498 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 494 controls from a population-based study in Sweden [CAncer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS)] using Affymetrix SNP arrays. By comparing allele intensities of approximately 500,000 SNP probes across the genome, a germ-line deletion at 2p24.3 was observed to be significantly more common in cases (12.63%) than in controls (8.28%); P = 0.028. To confirm the association, we genotyped this germ-line copy number variation (CNV) in additional subjects from CAPS and from Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH). Overall, among 4,314 cases and 2,176 controls examined, the CNV was significantly associated with prostate cancer risk [odds ratio (OR), 1.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.06-1.48; P = 0.009]. More importantly, the association was stronger for aggressive prostate cancer (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.08-1.58; P = 0.006) than for nonaggressive prostate cancer (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.98-1.45; P = 0.08). The biological effect of this germ-line CNV is unknown because no known gene resides in the deletion. Results from this study represent the first novel germ-line CNV that was identified from a genome-wide search and was significantly, but moderately, associated with prostate cancer risk. Additional confirmation of this association and functional studies are warranted.
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27.
  • Sun, Jielin, et al. (författare)
  • Evidence for two independent prostate cancer risk-associated loci in the HNF1B gene at 17q12
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - London : Nature Publishing Group. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 40:10, s. 1153-1155
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • We carried out a fine-mapping study in the HNF1B gene at 17q12 in two study populations and identified a second locus associated with prostate cancer risk, 26 kb centromeric to the first known locus (rs4430796); these loci are separated by a recombination hot spot. We confirmed the association with a SNP in the second locus (rs11649743) in five additional populations, with P = 1.7 10-9 for an allelic test of the seven studies combined. The association at each SNP remained significant after adjustment for the other SNP.
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28.
  • Teerlink, Craig C., et al. (författare)
  • Association analysis of 9,560 prostate cancer cases from the International Consortium of Prostate Cancer Genetics confirms the role of reported prostate cancer associated SNPs for familial disease
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Human Genetics. - : Springer. - 0340-6717 .- 1432-1203. ; 133:3, s. 347-356
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Previous GWAS studies have reported significant associations between various common SNPs and prostate cancer risk using cases unselected for family history. How these variants influence risk in familial prostate cancer is not well studied. Here, we analyzed 25 previously reported SNPs across 14 loci from prior prostate cancer GWAS. The International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG) previously validated some of these using a family-based association method (FBAT). However, this approach suffered reduced power due to the conditional statistics implemented in FBAT. Here, we use a case-control design with an empirical analysis strategy to analyze the ICPCG resource for association between these 25 SNPs and familial prostate cancer risk. Fourteen sites contributed 12,506 samples (9,560 prostate cancer cases, 3,368 with aggressive disease, and 2,946 controls from 2,283 pedigrees). We performed association analysis with Genie software which accounts for relationships. We analyzed all familial prostate cancer cases and the subset of aggressive cases. For the familial prostate cancer phenotype, 20 of the 25 SNPs were at least nominally associated with prostate cancer and 16 remained significant after multiple testing correction (p a parts per thousand currency sign 1E (-3)) occurring on chromosomal bands 6q25, 7p15, 8q24, 10q11, 11q13, 17q12, 17q24, and Xp11. For aggressive disease, 16 of the SNPs had at least nominal evidence and 8 were statistically significant including 2p15. The results indicate that the majority of common, low-risk alleles identified in GWAS studies for all prostate cancer also contribute risk for familial prostate cancer, and that some may contribute risk to aggressive disease.
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29.
  • Xu, Jianfeng, et al. (författare)
  • Estimation of absolute risk for prostate cancer using genetic markers and family history
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: The Prostate. - 0270-4137 .- 1097-0045. ; 69:14, s. 1565-1572
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Multiple DNA sequence variants in the form of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found to be reproducibly associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk. METHODS: Absolute risk for PCa among men with various numbers of inherited risk alleles and family history of PCa was estimated in a population-based case-control study in Sweden (2,893 cases and 1,781 controls), and a nested case-control study from the Prostate, Lung, Colon and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial in the U.S. (1,172 cases and 1,157 controls). RESULTS: Increased number of risk alleles and positive family history were independently associated with PCa risk. Considering men with 11 risk alleles (mode) and negative family history as having baseline risk, men who had >or=14 risk alleles and positive family history had an odds ratio (OR) of 4.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.64-6.64] in the Swedish study. These associations were confirmed in the U.S. population. Once a man's SNP genotypes and family history are known, his absolute risk for PCa can be readily calculated and easily interpreted. For example, 55-year-old men with a family history and >or=14 risk alleles have a 52% and 41% risk of being diagnosed with PCa in the next 20 years in the Swedish and U.S. populations, respectively. In comparison, without knowledge of genotype and family history, these men had an average population absolute risk of 13%. CONCLUSION: This risk prediction model may be used to identify men at considerably elevated PCa risk who may be selected for chemoprevention.
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30.
  • Zheng, S. Lilly, et al. (författare)
  • Genetic variants and family history predict prostate cancer similar to prostate-specific antigen
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Clinical Cancer Research. - 1078-0432 .- 1557-3265. ; 15:3, s. 1105-1111
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • PURPOSE: Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the best biomarker for predicting prostate cancer, its predictive performance needs to be improved. Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial revealed the overall performance measured by the areas under curve of the receiver operating characteristic at 0.68. The goal of the present study is to assess the ability of genetic variants as a PSA-independent method to predict prostate cancer risk. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We systematically evaluated all prostate cancer risk variants that were identified from genome-wide association studies during the past year in a large population-based prostate cancer case-control study population in Sweden, including 2,893 prostate cancer patients and 1,781 men without prostate cancer. RESULTS: Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms were independently associated with prostate cancer risk in this Swedish study population. Using a cutoff of any 11 risk alleles or family history, the sensitivity and specificity for predicting prostate cancer were 0.25 and 0.86, respectively. The overall predictive performance of prostate cancer using genetic variants, family history, and age, measured by areas under curve was 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.66), significantly improved over that of family history and age (0.61%; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.62; P = 2.3 x 10(-10)). CONCLUSION: The predictive performance for prostate cancer using genetic variants and family history is similar to that of PSA. The utility of genetic testing, alone and in combination with PSA levels, should be evaluated in large studies such as the European Randomized Study for Prostate Cancer trial and Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.
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