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1.
  • Sorgenfrei, Simon (författare)
  • Vem var Jalal al-Din Rumi
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Dagens Nyheter. ; :20070818
  • Tidskriftsartikel (populärvet., debatt m.m.)abstract
    • Essä om den muslimske mystikern och poeten Rumi
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2.
  • Jahani, Carina, et al. (författare)
  • Impersonal Constructions — A Brief Introduction
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Orientalia Suecana. - Uppsala : Department of Linguistics and Philology, Uppsala University. - 0078-6578. ; 59, s. 119-121
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
3.
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4.
  • Jahani, Carina, 1959-, et al. (författare)
  • Balochi
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: The Iranian languages. - London and New York : Routledge. - 978-0-7007-1131-4 - 978-0-203-64173-6 ; s. 634-692
  • Bokkapitel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Balochi (Bal.) is spoken in south-western Pakistan, in the province of Balochistan as well as by smaller populations in Punjab and Sindh and by a large number of people in Karachi. It is also spoken in south-eastern Iran, in the province of Sistan and Baluchistan and by Baloch who have settled in the north-eastern provinces of Khorasan and Golestan. It is furthermore spoken by smaller communities in Afghanistan (particularly in the province of Nimruz), in the Gulf States (especially in Oman and the United Arab Emirates), in the Marw / Mari region in Turkmenistan, in India, East Africa, and nowadays also by a considerable number of Baloch in North America, Europe and Australia.It is difficult to estimate the total number of Balochi speakers. Central authorities readily underestimate ethnic minorities, while members of ethnicities sometimes do the opposite. Censuses generally ignore the bi‑ or multilingual situation of most speakers. Moreover, large numbers of those who identify as Baloch do not speak the language any more, particularly in the areas bordering Indian languages in Punjab and Sindh, on the one hand, and in Khorasan and Golestan, on the other hand, as well as in East Africa and in the Gulf States. In contrast, Balochi has been retained quite well in Turkmenistan due to the adherence to a traditional rural lifestyle and the generally low level of education. The total number of speakers of Balochi has been estimated as being between 5-8 million (Jahani 2001: 59), but might also be somewhat higher than that. The chapter is a description of the various dialects of Balochi, their phonology, morphology and syntax. It also provides two short glossed samples of Balochi.
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6.
  • Okati, Farideh, et al. (författare)
  • The Status of [h] and [ʔ] in the Sistani Dialect of Miyankangi
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Iranian Journal of Applied Language Studies. - Zahedan : University of Sistan and Baluchestan. - 2008-5494. ; 1:1, s. 80-999
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The purpose of this article is to determine the phonemic status of [h] and [ʔ] in the Sistani dialect of Miyankangi. Auditory tests applied to the relevant data show that [ʔ] occurs mainly in word-initial position, where it stands in free variation with Ø. The only place where [h] is heard is in Arabic and Persian loanwords, and only by some speakers who are educated and/or have lived in urban centres, where inhabitants are in closer touch with Persian than in rural areas. The sound [h] also occurs in the pronunuciation of some Arabic loanwords where it replaces the glottal plosive, particularly in word medial, intervocalic position. The investigation shows that neither [ʔ] nor [h] have phonemic status in the Sistani dialect of Miyankangi at present, but that more intense contact with Persian may change this state in the future, particularly for [h].
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7.
  • Barjasteh Delforooz, Behrooz, 1961- (författare)
  • Discourse Features in Balochi of Sistan
  • 2010
  • Doktorsavhandling (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • This work presents a first study of discourse features in Balochi narratives of Sistan. Discourse analysis investigates what are the properties that make for well-formed texts in a language. There are many approaches to discourse analysis and most approaches focus on a particular aspect of text formation. The approach to text linguistics or discourse analysis taken in this work is based on Dooley and Levinsohn’s Analyzing Discourse: A manual of basic concepts (2001). Their methodology has been refined over years of practical use and, among diverse methodologies, they follow a functional and cognitive approach. In this dissertation, Roberts’ (2009) application of Dooley and Levinsohn’s methodology to Persian is followed in the study of our Sistani Balochi text corpus.In chapters 2-7 this approach is applied to Balochi narrative text. Chapter two introduces the reader to the discourse-pragmatic structuring of sentences in BS and chapter three shows how different syntactic devices can distinguish foreground and background information in BS oral texts. In chapter four we study the deixis of time and place and how the concept of proximal and distal deixis applies across a range of deictic elements. Chapter five examines some basic connectives and how they link propositions in the discourse context, and in chapter six reported speech is studied. Chapter seven illustrates how different participants are introduced into a discourse and how their activation status is signalled throughout the discourse.Appendix 1 contains details of the Balochi text-corpus used, and Appendix 2 contains interlinearized versions of ten of the main texts used in the study. A CD with nine audio files and one video file of the ten texts from Appendix 2, plus one extra video file, is also included.
8.
  • Hassanabadi, Mahmoud (författare)
  • One Epos and Some Ruckus
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Orientalia Suecana. - Uppsala : Department of Linguistics and Philology, Uppsala University. - 0078-6578. ; 59, s. 193-206
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Mohl, an early editor and translator of the Shāhnāme, began the discussion on Ferdowsi’s sources in the Shāhnāme in 1878. From that time until now, it has been one of main issues of discussion among expertson the Shāhnāme and Iranian culture. One can find various theories on Ferdowsi’s sources in the numerous works and articles which are published ever so often. One of the latest works in this field is Kumiko Yamamoto’s book The Oral Background of Persian Epics: Storytelling and Poetry. In the present article, first, various theories about Ferdowsi’s sources are classified in three groups with reference to their proponents, and then each of these theories is critically and briefly analysed. After a detailed introduction to Kumiko Yamamoto’s work, it is evaluated in view of the different theories proposed for the sources of the Shāhnāme. The present author favours the theory of both oral and written sources in the genesis of the Shāhnāme, and, in light of this, some strengths as well as weaknesses of this work are discussed in this extended review.
9.
  • Jahani, Carina, 1959-, et al. (författare)
  • Impersonal Constructions in Balochi
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Orientalia Suecana. - Uppsala. - 0078-6578. ; 59, s. 168-181
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Impersonal constructions are interesting from a typological perspective. Siewierska (2008: 3-4) finds that "[t]he semantic characterizations of impersonality centre on two notions", either "the lack of a human agent controlling the depicted situation or event" or "situations or events which may be brought about by a human agent but rucially one which is not specified." The present article focuses on grammatical constructions for situations or events brought about by a non-specified agent in one Iranian language, namely Balochi. It draws upon four Balochi corpuses available to the authors, comprising four different dialects of Balochi and consisting of altogether approximately 130,000 words.There are three constructions for a non-specific agent found in the corpus, those with the verb in 3PL, those with the verb in 2SG, and those with a passive verb. It seems that the 3PL construction allows the speaker to distance himself/herself from the event somehow in narrative texts, where the speaker and addressee are not included in the referential framework of this construction. The 2SG construction, on the contrary, allows an unrestricted impersonal interpretation in narrative texts. However, in procedural texts, the 2SG and 3PL constructions are used interchangeably to include the speaker, and probably also the addressee. The 2SG construction in narrative texts and the 2SG and 3PL constructions in procedural texts are open to a truly impersonal interpretation. Thus, the 3PL construction does follow the referential properties described by Siewierska (2008: 14–17) in narrative texts but has wider referential properties in procedural texts. In Balochi, the referential properties of the passive construction seem, on the contrary, not to be as unrestricted as Siewierska (2008: 23) suggests.
10.
  • Jahani, Carina, 1959- (författare)
  • Is there an "urban mind" in Balochi Literature?
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: The Urban Mind : Cultural and Environmental Dynamics. - Uppsala : Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University. - 978-91-506-2175-4 ; s. 457-470
  • Bokkapitel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • The purpose of this chapter is to compare themes in Balochi written literature with those found in Balochi oral literature in search for an “urban mind”. The Balochi language is spoken in south-western Pakistan and south-eastern Iran, as well as by smaller populations outside Balochistan proper. Various estimates give at hand that there may be between 8 and 10 million speakers of Balochi, or even more.Childe presents a number of criteria for urbanism which are used in this chapter to determine whether there is an urban mind in Balochi oral and written literature. The five written texts examined in this study all date from the 1950s and onwards, whereas the five oral texts are undated but assumed to be of a much earlier date than the written texts.The study shows that in the oral narratives the urban setting is put forth as an ideal. To become a king or the king’s son-in-law or the foremost merchant in the world is what constitutes true success, and not, for example, to become the richest farmer or cattle owner. This urban mind is only present in a fantasy world, however, and in the written literature there is a totally different and this time realistic setting for the stories. Here the scene is not a world where wishes come true, but the harsh reality of Balochistan. Urbanism as an ideal is absent in these stories, and even though urban phenomena are mentioned they are not crucial in any of the written stories.
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