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Sökning: L773:1873 2585

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1.
  • Bean, Christopher, 1990-, et al. (författare)
  • Poor peer relations in adolescence, social support in early adulthood, and depressive symptoms in later adulthood : evaluating mediation and interaction using four-way decomposition analysis
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Annals of Epidemiology. - 1047-2797 .- 1873-2585. ; 29, s. 52-59
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Purpose: Supportive social relations are associated with good mental health, yet few studies have considered the prospective importance of adolescent peer relations for adult mental health and the potential mechanisms involved.Methods: Participants (n=941) were sourced from the Northern Swedish Cohort, a prospective study comprising school students aged 16 in 1981. Integrating life course epidemiology with four-way decomposition analysis, this paper considers the controlled direct effect of poor peer relations at age 16 on depressive symptoms at age 43, the pure indirect effect mediated by the availability of social support at age 30, and potential interactions between the exposure and the mediator.Results: After controlling for gender, baseline depressive symptoms and parental socioeconomic position, poor peer relations at age 16 were associated with depressive symptoms at age 43, largely irrespective of social support at age 30. Nonetheless, poor peer relations in adolescence were associated with poorer social support at age 30, and mediation accounted for a modest proportion (pure indirect effect 10%) of the association between poor peer relations and depressive symptoms at age 43.Conclusions: Policies to foster constructive peer relations for adolescents at school are encouraged; such policies may promote both the availability of social support and better mental health across the life course.
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2.
  • Bellavia, Andrea, et al. (författare)
  • Alcohol consumption and mortality : a dose-response analysis in terms of time
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Annals of Epidemiology. - : ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. - 1047-2797 .- 1873-2585. ; 24:4, s. 291-296
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Purpose: Low-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with decreased mortality. However, many aspects of this association are still debated. Our aim was to complement available information by conducting a dose-response analysis of the association between alcohol consumption and survival time. Methods: In a Swedish population-based cohort of 67,706 middle-aged and elderly men and women, frequency and amount of drinking were assessed through a self-administrated questionnaire. During 15 years of follow-up, 13,323 participants died. Differences in survival (10th percentile differences, PDs) according to levels of alcohol consumption were estimated using Laplace regression. Results: We found evidence of nonlinearity between alcohol consumption and survival. Among women, we observed a rapid increase in survival up to 6 g/d of alcohol consumption (0.5 drinks/d) where survival was 17 months longer (PD = 17 months, 95% confidence interval, 10 to 24). After this peak, higher alcohol consumption was progressively associated with shorter survival. Among men, survival improved up to 15 g/d (1.5 drinks/d) where we observed a PD of 15 months (95% confidence interval, 8 to 22). Conclusions: Low alcohol consumption was associated with improved survival up to 1.5 years for women with an average consumption of 0.5 drinks per day and to 13 years for men with an average consumption of 1.5 drinks per day. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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3.
  • Bruckner, Tim .A., et al. (författare)
  • Cold ambient temperature in utero and birth outcomes in Uppsala, Sweden, 1915 to 1929
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Annals of Epidemiology. - 1047-2797 .- 1873-2585. ; 24:2, s. 116-121
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • PurposeAlthough the literature reports adverse birth outcomes following ambient heat, less work focuses on cold. We, moreover, know of no studies of cold that examine stillbirth. We tested the relation between cold ambient temperature during pregnancy in Sweden and four outcomes: stillbirth, preterm, birth weight for gestational age, and birth length. We examined births from 1915 to 1929 in Uppsala, Sweden, which—unlike most societies today—experienced substandard indoor-heating and fewer amenities to provide shelter from cold.MethodsWe retrieved data on almost 14,000 deliveries from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study. We linked a validated, daily ambient temperature series to all pregnancies and applied Cox proportional hazards (stillbirth and preterm) and linear regression models (birth weight and length). We tested for nonlinearity using quadratic splines.ResultsThe risk of stillbirth rose as ambient temperature during pregnancy fell (hazard ratio for a 1°C decrease in temperature, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.17). Cold extremes adversely affected preterm and birth length, whereas warm extremes increased preterm risk. We observed no relation between cold and birth weight for gestational age.ConclusionIn historical Sweden, cold temperatures during pregnancy increased stillbirth and preterm risk and reduced birth length among live births.
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  • Fedirko, Veronika, et al. (författare)
  • Alcohol drinking and endometrial cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Annals of Epidemiology. - 1047-2797 .- 1873-2585. ; 23:2, s. 93-98
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Purpose: Alcohol intake may adversely affect the concentrations of endogenous sex hormones, and thus increase the risk of endometrial cancer. However, epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting results. Therefore, we investigated the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk a large, multicenter, prospective study. Methods: From 1992 through 2010, 301,051 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort were followed for incident endometrial cancer (n = 1382). Baseline alcohol consumption was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Information on past alcohol consumption was collected by lifestyle questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. Results: The multivariable HRs (and 95% CIs) compared with light drinkers (0.1-6 g/d) were 1.03(0.88-1.20) for 0 g of alcohol per day at baseline, 1.01 (0.86-1.17) for 6.1-12 g/d, 1.03 (0.87-1.22) for 12.1-24 g/d, 1.07(0.87-1.38) for 241-36 g/d, and 0.85(0.61-1.18) for more than 36 g/d (p(trend) = 0.77). No association was observed among former drinkers (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.98-1.68 compared with light drinkers). Null associations were also found between alcohol consumption at age 20 years, lifetime pattern of alcohol drinking, and baseline alcohol intake from specific alcoholic beverages and endometrial cancer risk. Conclusions: Our findings suggest no association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk.
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