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Sökning: L773:1939 4551

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1.
  • Bachert, C, et al. (författare)
  • ICON: chronic rhinosinusitis
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: The World Allergy Organization journal. - 1939-4551. ; 7:1, s. 25-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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2.
  • Backman, Helena, et al. (författare)
  • Prevalence trends in respiratory symptoms and asthma in relation to smoking : two cross-sectional studies ten years apart among adults in northern Sweden
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: The World Allergy Organization journal. - : BioMed Central. - 1939-4551. ; 7:1, s. 1-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Smoking is considered to be the single most important preventable risk factor for respiratory symptoms. Estimating prevalence of respiratory symptoms is important since they most often precede a diagnosis of an obstructive airway disease, which places a major burden on the society. The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence trends of respiratory symptoms and asthma among Swedish adults, in relation to smoking habits. A further aim was to estimate the proportion of respiratory symptom and asthma prevalence attributable to smoking.METHODS: Data from two large-scale cross-sectional surveys among adults performed in northern Sweden in 1996 and 2006 were analysed. Identical methods and the same questionnaire were used in both surveys. The association between smoking, respiratory symptoms and asthma was analysed with multiple logistic regression analyses. Changes in prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma from 1996 to 2006 were expressed as odds ratios. Additionally, the population attributable risks of smoking were estimated.RESULTS: The prevalence of most respiratory symptoms decreased significantly from 1996 to 2006. Longstanding cough decreased from 12.4 to 10.1%, sputum production from 19.0 to 15.0%, chronic productive cough from 7.3 to 6.2%, and recurrent wheeze from 13.4 to 12.0%. Any wheeze and asthmatic wheeze remained unchanged. This parallels to a decrease in smoking from 27.4 to 19.1%. In contrast, physician-diagnosed asthma increased from 9.4 to 11.6%. The patterns were similar after correction for confounders. All respiratory symptoms were highly associated with smoking, and the proportion of respiratory symptoms in the population attributed to smoking (PAR) ranged from 9.8 to 25.5%. In 2006, PAR of smoking was highest for recurrent wheeze (20.6%).CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we found that respiratory symptoms, in particular symptoms common in bronchitis, decreased among adults in northern Sweden, parallel to a decrease in smoking from 1996 to 2006. In contrast, the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased during the same time-period. Up to one fourth of the respiratory symptom prevalence in the population was attributable to smoking.
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3.
  • Backman, Helena, et al. (författare)
  • Prevalence trends in respiratory symptoms and asthma in relation to smoking - two cross-sectional studies ten years apart among adults in northern Sweden
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: World Allergy Organization Journal. - 1939-4551. ; 7:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Abstract Background Smoking is considered to be the single most important preventable risk factor for respiratory symptoms. Estimating prevalence of respiratory symptoms is important since they most often precede a diagnosis of an obstructive airway disease, which places a major burden on the society. The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence trends of respiratory symptoms and asthma among Swedish adults, in relation to smoking habits. A further aim was to estimate the proportion of respiratory symptom and asthma prevalence attributable to smoking. Methods Data from two large-scale cross-sectional surveys among adults performed in northern Sweden in 1996 and 2006 were analysed. Identical methods and the same questionnaire were used in both surveys. The association between smoking, respiratory symptoms and asthma was analysed with multiple logistic regression analyses. Changes in prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma from 1996 to 2006 were expressed as odds ratios. Additionally, the population attributable risks of smoking were estimated. Results The prevalence of most respiratory symptoms decreased significantly from 1996 to 2006. Longstanding cough decreased from 12.4 to 10.1%, sputum production from 19.0 to 15.0%, chronic productive cough from 7.3 to 6.2%, and recurrent wheeze from 13.4 to 12.0%. Any wheeze and asthmatic wheeze remained unchanged. This parallels to a decrease in smoking from 27.4 to 19.1%. In contrast, physician-diagnosed asthma increased from 9.4 to 11.6%. The patterns were similar after correction for confounders. All respiratory symptoms were highly associated with smoking, and the proportion of respiratory symptoms in the population attributed to smoking (PAR) ranged from 9.8 to 25.5%. In 2006, PAR of smoking was highest for recurrent wheeze (20.6%). Conclusions In conclusion, we found that respiratory symptoms, in particular symptoms common in bronchitis, decreased among adults in northern Sweden, parallel to a decrease in smoking from 1996 to 2006. In contrast, the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased during the same time-period. Up to one fourth of the respiratory symptom prevalence in the population was attributable to smoking.
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  • Backman, Helena, et al. (författare)
  • FEV1 decline in relation to blood eosinophils and neutrophils in a population-based asthma cohort
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: The World Allergy Organization journal. - : Elsevier. - 1939-4551 .- 1731-3317. ; 13:3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The relationship between lung function decline and eosinophils and neutrophils has important therapeutic implications among asthmatics, but it has rarely been studied in large cohort studies.Objective: The aim is to study the relationship between blood eosinophils and neutrophils and FEV1 decline in a long-term follow-up of a population-based adult asthma cohort.Methods: In 2012-2014, an adult asthma cohort was invited to a follow-up including spirometry, blood sampling, and structured interviews, and n = 892 participated (55% women, mean age 59 y, 32-92 y). Blood eosinophils, neutrophils and FEV 1 decline were analyzed both as continuous variables and divided into categories with different cut-offs. Regression models adjusted for smoking, exposure to vapors, gas, dust, or fumes (VGDF), use of inhaled and oral corticosteroids, and other possible confounders were utilized to analyze the relationship between eosinophils and neutrophils at follow-up and FEV1 decline.Results: The mean follow-up time was 18 years, and the mean FEV 1 decline was 27 ml/year. The annual FEV1 decline was related to higher levels of both blood eosinophils and neutrophils at follow-up, but only the association with eosinophils remained when adjusted for confounders. Further, the association between FEV1 decline and eosinophils was stronger among those using ICS. With EOS <0.3 × 109/L as reference, a more rapid decline in FEV1 was independently related to EOS ≥0.4 × 109/L in adjusted analyses.Conclusions and clinical relevance: Besides emphasizing the importance of smoking cessation and reduction of other harmful exposures, our real-world results indicate that there is an independent relationship between blood eosinophils and FEV1 decline among adults with asthma.
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  • Resultat 1-10 av 35
  • [1]234Nästa

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