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Sökning: LAR1:gu > Tidskriftsartikel > Refereegranskat > Sjöström Lars > Narbro Kristina 1953

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1.
  • Delling, Lotta, et al. (författare)
  • Feasibility of bariatric surgery as a strategy for secondary prevention in cardiovascular disease: a report from the Swedish obese subjects trial.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Journal of obesity (Online). - 2090-0716. ; 2010
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims. Evaluation of bariatric surgery as secondary prevention in obese patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). Methods. Analysis of data from 4047 subjects in the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOSs) study. Thirty-five patients with IHD are treated with bariatric surgery (n = 21) or conventional treatment (n = 14). Mean follow-up is 10.8 years. Results. Bariatric surgery resulted in sustained weight loss during the study period. After 2 years, the surgery group displayed significant reductions in cardiovascular risk factors, relief from cardiorespiratory symptoms, increments in physical activity, and improved quality of life. After 10 years, recovery from hypertension, diabetes, physical inactivity, and depression was still more common in the surgery group. There were no signs of increased cardiovascular morbidity or mortality in the surgery group. Conclusion. Bariatric surgery appears to be a safe and feasible treatment to achieve long-term weight loss and improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, symptoms, and quality of life in obese subjects with IHD.
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2.
  • Gripeteg, Lena, 1970-, et al. (författare)
  • Effects of bariatric surgery on disability pension in Swedish obese subjects
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Obesity. - 0307-0565. ; 36:3, s. 356-362
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Prospective controlled data on the long-term effects of bariatric surgery on disability pension are not available. This study prospectively compare disability pension in surgically and conventionally treated obese men and women. METHODS: The Swedish obese subjects study started in 1987 and involved 2010 obese patients who had bariatric surgery and 2037 contemporaneously matched obese controls, who received conventional treatment. Outcomes of this report were: (i) incidence of disability pension from study inclusion to 31 December 2006 in all subjects, and, (ii) number of disability pension days over 10 years in a subgroup of individuals (N=2901) followed for at least 10 years where partial pensions were recalculated to full number of days per year. Objective information on granted disability pension was obtained from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency and disability pension follow-up rate was 99.9%. RESULTS: In men, the unadjusted incidence of disability pension did not differ between the surgery and control groups (N=156 in both groups). When adjusting for baseline confounders in men, a reduced risk of disability pension was suggested in the surgery group (hazard ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.62-1.00; P=0.05). Furthermore, the adjusted average number of disability pension days was lower in the surgery group, 609 versus 734 days (P=0.01). In women, bariatric surgery was not associated with significant effects on incidence or number of days of disability pension. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery may be associated with favourable effects on disability pension for up to 19 years in men whereas neither favourable nor unfavourable effects could be detected in women.
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3.
  • Neovius, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Health Care Use During 20 Years Following Bariatric Surgery
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. - 0098-7484. ; 308:11, s. 1132-1141
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Context Bariatric surgery results in sustained weight loss; reduced incidence of diabetes, cardiovascular events, and cancer; and improved survival. The long-term effect on health care use is unknown. Objective To assess health care use over 20 years by obese patients treated conventionally or with bariatric surgery. Design, Setting, and Participants The Swedish Obese Subjects study is an ongoing, prospective, nonrandomized, controlled intervention study conducted in the Swedish health care system that included 2010 adults who underwent bariatric surgery and 2037 contemporaneously matched controls recruited between 1987 and 2001. Inclusion criteria were age 37 years to 60 years and body mass index of 34 or higher in men and 38 or higher in women. Exclusion criteria were identical in both groups. Interventions Of the surgery patients, 13% underwent gastric bypass, 19% gastric banding, and 68% vertical-banded gastroplasty. Controls received conventional obesity treatment. Main Outcome Measures Annual hospital days (follow-up years 1 to 20; data capture 1987-2009; median follow-up 15 years) and nonprimary care outpatient visits (years 2-20; data capture 2001-2009; median follow-up 9 years) were retrieved from the National Patient Register, and drug costs from the Prescribed Drug Register (years 7-20; data capture 2005-2011; median follow-up 6 years). Registry linkage was complete for more than 99% of patients (4044 of 4047). Mean differences were adjusted for baseline age, sex, smoking, diabetes status, body mass index, inclusion period, and (for the inpatient care analysis) hospital days the year before the index date. Results In the 20 years following their bariatric procedure, surgery patients used a total of 54 mean cumulative hospital days compared with 40 used by those in the control group (adjusted difference, 15; 95% CI, 2-27; P = .03). During the years 2 through 6, surgery patients had an accumulated annual mean of 1.7 hospital days vs 1.2 days among control patients (adjusted difference, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.7; P < .001). From year 7 to 20, both groups had a mean annual 1.8 hospital days (adjusted difference, 0.0; 95% CI, −0.3 to 0.3; P = .95). Surgery patients had a mean annual 1.3 nonprimary care outpatient visits during the years 2 through 6 vs 1.1 among the controls (adjusted difference, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.4; P = .003), but from year 7, the 2 groups did not differ (1.8 vs 1.9 mean annual visits; adjusted difference, −0.2; 95% CI, −0.4 to 0.1; P = .12). From year 7 to 20, the surgery group incurred a mean annual drug cost of US $930; the control patients, $1123 (adjusted difference, −$228; 95% CI, −$335 to −$121; P < .001). Conclusions Compared with controls, surgically treated patients used more inpatient and nonprimary outpatient care during the first 6-year period after undergoing bariatric surgery but not thereafter. Drug costs from years 7 through 20 were lower for surgery patients than for control patients.
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4.
  • Sjöström, Lars, et al. (författare)
  • Bariatric surgery and long-term cardiovascular events.
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association. - 1538-3598. ; 307:1, s. 56-65
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Weight loss might protect against cardiovascular events, but solid evidence is lacking.
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5.
  • Sjöström, Lars, et al. (författare)
  • Effects of bariatric surgery on cancer incidence in obese patients in Sweden (Swedish Obese Subjects Study): a prospective, controlled intervention trial.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: The lancet oncology. - 1474-5488. ; 10:7, s. 653
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. Intentional weight loss in the obese might protect against malignancy, but evidence is limited. To our knowledge, the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study is the first intervention trial in the obese population to provide prospective, controlled cancer-incidence data. METHODS: The SOS study started in 1987 and involved 2010 obese patients (body-mass index [BMI] &gt;or=34 kg/m(2) in men, and &gt;or=38 kg/m(2) in women) who underwent bariatric surgery and 2037 contemporaneously matched obese controls, who received conventional treatment. While the main endpoint of SOS was overall mortality, the main outcome of this exploratory report was cancer incidence until Dec 31, 2005. Cancer follow-up rate was 99.9% and the median follow-up time was 10.9 years (range 0-18.1 years). FINDINGS: Bariatric surgery resulted in a sustained mean weight reduction of 19.9 kg (SD 15.6 kg) over 10 years, whereas the mean weight change in controls was a gain of 1.3 kg (SD 13.7 kg). The number of first-time cancers after inclusion was lower in the surgery group (n=117) than in the control group (n=169; HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.53-0.85, p=0.0009). The sex-treatment interaction p value was 0.054. In women, the number of first-time cancers after inclusion was lower in the surgery group (n=79) than in the control group (n=130; HR 0.58, 0.44-0.77; p=0.0001), whereas there was no effect of surgery in men (38 in the surgery group vs 39 in the control group; HR 0.97, 0.62-1.52; p=0.90). Similar results were obtained after exclusion of all cancer cases during the first 3 years of the intervention. INTERPRETATION: Bariatric surgery was associated with reduced cancer incidence in obese women but not in obese men. FUNDING: Swedish Research Council, Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research, Swedish Federal Government under the LUA/ALF agreement, Hoffmann La Roche, Cederoths, AstraZeneca, Sanofi-Aventis, Ethicon Endosurgery.
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6.
  • Sjöström, Lars, et al. (författare)
  • Effects of bariatric surgery on mortality in Swedish obese subjects.
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: The New England journal of medicine. - 1533-4406. ; 357:8, s. 741
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with increased mortality. Weight loss improves cardiovascular risk factors, but no prospective interventional studies have reported whether weight loss decreases overall mortality. In fact, many observational studies suggest that weight reduction is associated with increased mortality. METHODS: The prospective, controlled Swedish Obese Subjects study involved 4047 obese subjects. Of these subjects, 2010 underwent bariatric surgery (surgery group) and 2037 received conventional treatment (matched control group). We report on overall mortality during an average of 10.9 years of follow-up. At the time of the analysis (November 1, 2005), vital status was known for all but three subjects (follow-up rate, 99.9%). RESULTS: The average weight change in control subjects was less than +/-2% during the period of up to 15 years during which weights were recorded. Maximum weight losses in the surgical subgroups were observed after 1 to 2 years: gastric bypass, 32%; vertical-banded gastroplasty, 25%; and banding, 20%. After 10 years, the weight losses from baseline were stabilized at 25%, 16%, and 14%, respectively. There were 129 deaths in the control group and 101 deaths in the surgery group. The unadjusted overall hazard ratio was 0.76 in the surgery group (P=0.04), as compared with the control group, and the hazard ratio adjusted for sex, age, and risk factors was 0.71 (P=0.01). The most common causes of death were myocardial infarction (control group, 25 subjects; surgery group, 13 subjects) and cancer (control group, 47; surgery group, 29). CONCLUSIONS: Bariatric surgery for severe obesity is associated with long-term weight loss and decreased overall mortality.
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7.
  • Sjöström, Lars, et al. (författare)
  • Lifestyle, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors 10 years after bariatric surgery.
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: The New England journal of medicine. - 1533-4406. ; 351:26, s. 2683-93
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Weight loss is associated with short-term amelioration and prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular risk, but whether these benefits persist over time is unknown. METHODS: The prospective, controlled Swedish Obese Subjects Study involved obese subjects who underwent gastric surgery and contemporaneously matched, conventionally treated obese control subjects. We now report follow-up data for subjects (mean age, 48 years; mean body-mass index, 41) who had been enrolled for at least 2 years (4047 subjects) or 10 years (1703 subjects) before the analysis (January 1, 2004). The follow-up rate for laboratory examinations was 86.6 percent at 2 years and 74.5 percent at 10 years. RESULTS: After two years, the weight had increased by 0.1 percent in the control group and had decreased by 23.4 percent in the surgery group (P<0.001). After 10 years, the weight had increased by 1.6 percent and decreased by 16.1 percent, respectively (P<0.001). Energy intake was lower and the proportion of physically active subjects higher in the surgery group than in the control group throughout the observation period. Two- and 10-year rates of recovery from diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, and hyperuricemia were more favorable in the surgery group than in the control group, whereas recovery from hypercholesterolemia did not differ between the groups. The surgery group had lower 2- and 10-year incidence rates of diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, and hyperuricemia than the control group; differences between the groups in the incidence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension were undetectable. CONCLUSIONS: As compared with conventional therapy, bariatric surgery appears to be a viable option for the treatment of severe obesity, resulting in long-term weight loss, improved lifestyle, and, except for hypercholesterolemia, amelioration in risk factors that were elevated at baseline.
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