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Träfflista för sökning "LAR1:gu ;pers:(Wallin Anders 1950);pers:(Blennow Kaj 1958);pers:(Rosengren Lars 1954)"

Sökning: LAR1:gu > Wallin Anders 1950 > Blennow Kaj 1958 > Rosengren Lars 1954

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1.
  • Blennow, Kaj, 1958-, et al. (författare)
  • No neurochemical evidence of brain injury after blast overpressure by repeated explosions or firing heavy weapons.
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Acta neurologica Scandinavica. - 1600-0404. ; 123, s. 245-51
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Blennow K, Jonsson M, Andreasen N, Rosengren L, Wallin A, Hellström PA, Zetterberg H. No neurochemical evidence of brain injury after blast overpressure by repeated explosions or firing heavy weapons.Acta Neurol Scand: DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01408.x .(c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background - Psychiatric and neurological symptoms are common among soldiers exposed to blast without suffering a direct head injury. It is not known whether such symptoms are direct consequences of blast overpressure. Objective - To examine if repeated detonating explosions or firing if of heavy weapons is associated with neurochemical evidence of brain damage. Materials and methods - Three controlled experimental studies. In the first, army officers were exposed to repeated firing of a FH77B howitzer or a bazooka. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was taken post-exposure to measure biomarkers for brain damage. In the second, officers were exposed for up to 150 blasts by firing a bazooka, and in the third to 100 charges of detonating explosives of 180 dB. Serial serum samples were taken after exposure. Results were compared with a control group consisting of 19 unexposed age-matched healthy volunteers. Results - The CSF biomarkers for neuronal/axonal damage (tau and neurofilament protein), glial cell injury (GFAP and S-100b), blood-brain barrier damage (CSF/serum albumin ratio) and hemorrhages (hemoglobin and bilirubin) and the serum GFAP and S-100b showed normal and stable levels in all exposed officers. Discussion - Repeated exposure to high-impact blast does not result in any neurochemical evidence of brain damage. These findings are of importance for soldiers regularly exposed to high-impact blast when firing artillery shells or other types of heavy weapons.
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2.
  • Jonsson, Michael, 1955-, et al. (författare)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of white matter lesions - cross-sectional results from the LADIS study.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: European journal of neurology. - 1468-1331. ; 17:3, s. 377-382
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background and purpose: White matter lesions (WMLs) caused by small vessel disease are common in elderly people and contribute to cognitive impairment. There are no established biochemical markers for WMLs. We aimed to study the relation between degree of WMLs rated on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of structural biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subcortical vascular dementia. Methods: Fifty-three non-demented elderly individuals with WMLs were subjected to lumbar puncture. Degree of WMLs was rated using the Fazekas scale. Volumetric assessment of WMLs was performed. CSF samples were analyzed for the 40 and 42 amino acid fragments of amyloid beta, alpha- and beta-cleaved soluble amyloid precursor protein, total tau (T-tau), hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau(181)), neurofilament light protein (NFL), sulfatide and CSF/Serum-albumin ratio. Results: Fifteen subjects had mild, 23 had moderate and 15 had severe degree of WMLs. CSF-NFL levels differed between the groups (P < 0.001) and correlated with the volume of WMLs (r = 0.477, P < 0.001). CSF sulfatide concentration displayed similar changes but less strongly. T-tau, P-tau(181) and the different amyloid markers as well as CSF/S-albumin ratio did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusions: The association of increased CSF-NFL levels with increasing severity of WMLs in non-demented subjects suggests that NFL is a marker for axonal damage in response to small vessel disease in the brain. This manifestation may be distinct from or earlier than the neurodegenerative process seen in AD, as reflected by the lack of association between WMLs and AD biomarkers.
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4.
  • Sjögren, Magnus, et al. (författare)
  • Neurofilament protein in cerebrospinal fluid: a marker of white matter changes.
  • 2001
  • Ingår i: Journal of neuroscience research. - 0360-4012. ; 66:3, s. 510-6
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The objective of this study was to compare cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the light subtype of the neurofilament proteins (NFL), tau, and beta-amyloid42 (Abeta42) in individuals with moderate or severe white matter changes (WMC) and in those with mild or no WMC. Twenty-two patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), nine patients with subcortical vascular dementia (SVD), and 20 normal controls were included in the study. The occurrence of WMC was evaluated by a neuroradiologist using the Blennow-Wallin scale. Thirty-seven subjects had no or only punctate WMC; 14 had moderate to severe WMC. Both diagnostic group and WMC, but not gender or apolipoproteinE E4 inheritance, contributed to the variance in the CSF levels of tau, NFL, and Abeta42. In patients with moderate to severe WMC, CSF NFL (P < 0.01), but not CSF tau or CSF Abeta42, was increased also after correction for age, gender, and degree of cognitive impairment. A comparison between patients and controls with any signs of WMC and those without such signs yielded a similar result: CSF NFL (P < 0.001) was increased in the group with signs of WMC. As in numerous previous studies, we found that CSF tau was increased in AD (P < 0.001) compared with controls. Furthermore, CSF NFL was increased in both AD and SVD compared with controls (P < 0.001 for both). Although diagnostic group seems to be a stronger predictor of the variance found in CSF NFL, a clear association between the presence of WMC and increased CSF NFL was found. Because NFL is located mainly in large myelinated axons, increased CSF NFL in individuals with WMC probably reflects axonal degeneration.
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6.
  • Zetterberg, Henrik, 1973-, et al. (författare)
  • No neurochemical evidence for brain injury caused by heading in soccer.
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: British journal of sports medicine. - 1473-0480. ; 41:9, s. 574-7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: The possible injurious effect to the brain of heading in soccer is a matter of discussion. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether standardised headings in soccer are associated with increased levels of biochemical markers for neuronal injury in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. METHODS: 23 male amateur soccer players took part in a heading training session involving heading a ball kicked from a distance of 30 m at least 10 m forward. Ten players performed 10 and 13 players performed 20 approved headings. The players underwent lumbar puncture and serum sampling 7-10 days after the headings. The study also included 10 healthy male non-athletic control subjects. CSF was analysed for neurofilament light protein, total tau, glial fibrillary acidic protein, S-100B and albumin concentrations. Serum was analysed for S-100B and albumin. RESULTS: None of the biomarker levels were abnormal and there were no significant differences between any of the three groups, except for a slightly increased CSF S-100B concentration in controls compared with headers. Biomarker levels did not correlate with the number of headings performed. CONCLUSION: Repeated low-severity head impacts due to heading in soccer are not associated with any neurochemical signs of injury to the brain.
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