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Sökning: LAR1:hig > Umeå universitet > Häggman Henrikson Birgitta

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1.
  • Eriksson, Per-Olof, et al. (författare)
  • Deranged jaw-neck motor control in whiplash-associated disorders
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Oral Sciences. - 0909-8836. ; 112:1, s. 25-32
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Recent findings of simultaneous and well coordinated head-neck movements during single as well as rhythmic jaw opening-closing tasks has led to the conclusion that 'functional jaw movements' are the result of activation of jaw as well as neck muscles, leading to simultaneous movements in the temporomandibular, atlanto-occipital and cervical spine joints. It can therefore be assumed that disease or injury to any of these joint systems would disturb natural jaw function. To test this hypothesis, amplitudes, temporal coordination, and spatiotemporal consistency of concomitant mandibular and head-neck movements during single maximal jaw opening-closing tasks were analysed in 25 individuals suffering from whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) using optoelectronic movement recording technique. In addition, the relative durations for which the head position was equal to, leading ahead of, or lagging behind the mandibular position during the entire jaw opening-closing cycle were determined. Compared with healthy individuals, the WAD group showed smaller amplitudes, and changed temporal coordination between mandibular and head-neck movements. No divergence from healthy individuals was found for the spatiotemporal consistency or for the analysis during the entire jaw opening-closing cycle. These findings in the WAD group of a 'faulty', but yet consistent, jaw-neck behavior may reflect a basic importance of linked control of the jaw and neck sensory-motor systems. In conclusion, the present results suggest that neck injury is associated with deranged control of mandibular and head-neck movements during jaw opening-closing tasks, and therefore might compromise natural jaw function.
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2.
  • Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta, et al. (författare)
  • Endurance during chewing in whiplash-associated disorders and TMD.
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: Journal of Dental Research. - 0022-0345. ; 83:12, s. 946-50
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We have previously shown an association between ncck injury and disturbed jaw function. This study tested the hypothesis of a relationship between neck injury and impaired endurance during chewing. Fifty patients with whiplash-associated disorders (\VAD) were compared with 50 tcmporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients and 50 healthy subjects. Endurance was evaluated during unilateral chewing of gum for 5 min when participants reported fatigue and pain. Whereas aH healthy suhjects complcted the task, 1/4 of the TMD and a majority of the \VAD patients discontinued the task. A majority of the WAD patients also reported fatigue and paln. These ndings suggest an association between neck injury and reduced functional capacity of the jaw motor system. From the results, we propose that routinc cxamination of ‘VAD patients should include jaw function and that an endurance test as described in this study could also be a useful tool for nondental professionals.
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3.
  • Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta, et al. (författare)
  • Head movements during chewing : relation to size and texture of bolus.
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: Journal of Dental Research. - 0022-0345. ; 83:11, s. 864-868
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Coordinated manibular and head-neck movements during jaw opening-closing activities suggest a close functionallinkage between the jaw (Th and the neck regions. The present study al., investigated whether size and texture of bolus can texl intluence head-neck behavior during chewing. Ho' Using an optoelectronic 3-D recording technique, et , we analyzed concomitant mandibular and head- and neck movements in 12 healthy adults chewing small (3 g) and large (9 g) boluses of chewing resl gum and Optosil. The main finding was a head sim extension during chewing, the amount of which cer' was related mainly to bolus size. Furthermore, suc each chewing cycle was accompanied not only by ya" mandibular movements, but a1so by head mol extension-flexion movements. Larger head the movement amplitudes were correlated with larger but size and, to some extent, also with harder texture yet of the bolus. The results suggest that head-neck of t behavior during chewing is modulated in response acCI to changes in jaw sensory-motor input.
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4.
  • Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta (författare)
  • Neck function in rhythmic jaw activities
  • 2004
  • Doktorsavhandling (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Previous studies in animals and humans show anatomic and physiological connections between the trigeminal and cervical regions. This investigation tested the hypothesis of a functional integration between the human jaw and neck motor systems in rhythmic jaw activities. By means of a wireless optoelectronic 3-D movement recording system, spatiotemporal characteristics of mandibular and head-neck movements were studied during rhythmic jaw opening-closing and chewing tasks, in healthy and in individuals with pain and dysfunction in the jaw and neck region following neck trauma, Whiplash-associated Disorders (WAD). As a basis, a methodological study evaluated the applicability of skin and teeth attached reflex markers fixed to the lower jaw and to the head in optoelectronic recording of chewing movements.The results showed concomitant and coordinated mandibular and head movements during rhythmic jaw tasks. The start of the head movement generally preceded the start of the mandibular movement. For chewing, larger size and harder texture of bolus were associated with larger head extension and larger amplitude of both mandibular and head movements. Immobilization of the head by mechanical fixation deranged jaw motor behaviour with regard to speed and amplitude of mandibular movements. Even with head fixation, muscle activity was present in neck muscles during activities. Compared to healthy subjects, WAD individuals showed smaller amplitudes and disturbed coordination of mandibular and head movements. Furthermore, a dynamic load test showed a reduced endurance during chewing in the WAD group.In conclusion, the results suggest that optimal jaw function requires free unrestricted head-neck movements and support the hypothesis of a close functional relationship between the jaw and the neck regions in rhythmic jaw activities. A new concept for human jaw function is proposed, in which "functional jaw movements" are the result of activation of jaw as well as neck muscles, leading to simultaneous movements in the temporomandibular, atlanto-occipital and cervical spine joints. The finding of an association between neck injury and disturbed jaw behaviour suggest that assessment and management of neck injured patients should include jaw function.
5.
  • Wiesinger, Birgitta, et al. (författare)
  • Experimental masseter muscle pain alters jaw-neck motor strategy
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Pain. - 1090-3801. ; 17:7, s. 995-1004
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND:A functional integration between the jaw and neck regions has been demonstrated during normal jaw function. The effect of masseter muscle pain on this integrated motor behaviour in man is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of induced masseter muscle pain on jaw-neck movements during a continuous jaw opening-closing task.METHODS:Sixteen healthy men performed continuous jaw opening-closing movements to a target position, defined as 75% of the maximum jaw opening. Each subject performed two trials without pain (controls) and two trials with masseter muscle pain, induced with hypertonic saline as a single injection. Simultaneous movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless optoelectronic three-dimensional recording system. Differences in movement amplitudes between trials were analysed with Friedman's test and corrected Wilcoxon matched pairs test.RESULTS:The head movement amplitudes were significantly larger during masseter muscle pain trials compared with control. Jaw movement amplitudes did not differ significantly between any of the trials after corrected Wilcoxon tests. The ratio between head and jaw movement amplitudes was significantly larger during the first pain trial compared with control.CONCLUSIONS:Experimental masseter muscle pain in humans affected integrated jaw-neck movements by increasing the neck component during continuous jaw opening-closing tasks. The findings indicate that pain can alter the strategy for jaw-neck motor control, which further underlines the functional integration between the jaw and neck regions. This altered strategy may have consequences for development of musculoskeletal pain in the jaw and neck regions.
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