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Sökning: LAR1:oru > (2000-2004) > Ersta Sköndal högskola

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1.
  • Andershed, Birgitta, et al. (författare)
  • Development of a theoretical framework describing relatives' involvement in palliative care
  • 2001
  • Ingår i: Journal of Advanced Nursing. - 0309-2402. ; 34:4, s. 554-562
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND:The present study is based on four earlier studies in which the authors classified the relative's involvement in palliative care into different categories and described the involvement as "involvement in the light" or "involvement in the dark".AIM:The aim of the study was to develop a theoretical framework concerning the involvement of relatives based on an in-depth analysis of the results of the four earlier studies.METHOD:Walker & Avant's (1995) strategies for theory construction were used for development of the framework. A number of different concepts, assumptions and statements about relatives' involvement were penetrated in an in-depth analysis.RESULTS:From the concepts two theoretical "blocks" of the relatives' involvement were developed and these constitute the foundation for the framework. One is based on concrete descriptions of the concepts "to know", "to be" and "to do". The other describes how the concepts of "involvement in the light" and "involvement in the dark" differ. Factors that promoted involvement in the light were professional care based on humanistic values, a stronger sense of coherence on the part of relatives, an appropriate illness trajectory, and other available resources. The opposite was the case for those who were involved in the dark. Five assumptions successively developed which together form the theoretical framework.CONCLUSIONS:An important conclusion that can be of importance in palliative care is that the manner in which the staff act toward the patient and relatives influence relatives' possibilities for involvement, patients' possibilities for an appropriate death, and the possibilities the staff have to give good care.
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2.
  • Andershed, Birgitta, et al. (författare)
  • Närståendes behov i palliativ vård
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: Närståendes behov : omvårdnad som akademiskt ämne III. - Stockholm : Svensk sjuksköterskeförening. - 91-85060-09-7 ; s. 103-115
  • Bokkapitel (populärvet., debatt m.m.)
3.
  • Shields, Linda, et al. (författare)
  • Nursing and health care in Sweden
  • 2002
  • Ingår i: The Australian journal of advanced nursing. - 0813-0531. ; 20:1, s. 20-26
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Sweden, one of the Nordic countries, has a long history of social justice and equality of access to health care. Nursing plays an important role in this and nursing education is of a high standard. The aim of this paper is to describe Sweden's health system and nursing within it, thereby giving Australian nurses information which may generate an interest in, and provide background for, collaborative work. It is part of a series initiated by the first author who visited Sweden, Iceland and England in 2000 under the auspices of a Churchill Fellowship, and who has returned to Sweden and England to continue work begun during the Fellowship. Sweden's health service is characterised by an ethic of egalitarianism and high standards; primary health care plays a large role and tertiary health care is easily accessible. Nursing in Sweden is of a high standard, with devolvement of responsibility and decision-making to those working in the wards and units. Nursing education has been influenced by the historical development of nursing in Europe and today, Swedish nurses enjoy a high standard of university education with government support readily available to make specialist education accessible. Because of the similarities in both the cultures, and nursing, in Australia and Sweden, Australian nurses would find Sweden a wonderful country in which to implement cross-cultural, collaborative work.
4.
  • Ternestedt, Britt-Marie, et al. (författare)
  • A good death - Development of a nursing model of care
  • 2002
  • Ingår i: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. - 1522-2179. ; 4:3, s. 153-160
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The aim of this study was to describe the ongoing process at a Swedish hospice to further develop a model for care planning, documentation, and evaluation of the quality of death. The model was adapted to a nursing context by means of concept derivation. The core of the model is the patient as a person, in which that person’s experiences and need for control in his or her life are acknowledged. Six key words have been used as guidelines in this process: symptom control, self-determination, social relations, self-image, synthesis, and surrender. In a retrospective analysis of patient deaths it was found that of 35 patients, 15 had a very good death, 17 a good death, and 3 a bad death. Use of the 6 S key words provided the staff with continual opportunities for reflection, which was described as increasing their awareness concerning the needs of individual patients and concerning individualized nursing care.
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5.
  • Werkander-Harstäde, Carina, et al. (författare)
  • Good palliative care - Who and where?
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. - 1522-2179. ; 6:1, s. 27-35
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    •  The aim of this study was to describe what patients with cancer who are in the final stage of life consider to be good palliative end-of-life care and where they think such care should be carried out. Nine patients receiving palliative end-of-life care were interviewed and the material was analyzed using Grounded Theory. Three main categories (and 7 subcategories) emerged during the analysis: safety, participation, and trust. They were conceptualized metaphorically as a wheel that rolls along smoothly as long as the care is good and all 3 categories are present. The concepts of safety, participation, and trust were interwoven with the patients' beliefs about where this care should be carried out. The majority said that they wanted to be cared for in the hospital.
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