SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "WAKA:ref ;pers:(Lissner Lauren 1956);pers:(Bengtsson Calle 1934);lar1:(uu)"

Sökning: WAKA:ref > Lissner Lauren 1956 > Bengtsson Calle 1934 > Uppsala universitet

  • Resultat 1-3 av 3
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  • Erqou, Sebhat, et al. (författare)
  • Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association. - 1538-3598. ; 302:4, s. 412
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • CONTEXT:Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke.OBJECTIVE:To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular and nonvascular outcomes.STUDY SELECTION:Long-term prospective studies that recorded Lp(a) concentration and subsequent major vascular morbidity and/or cause-specific mortality published between January 1970 and March 2009 were identified through electronic searches of MEDLINE and other databases, manual searches of reference lists, and discussion with collaborators.DATA EXTRACTION:Individual records were provided for each of 126,634 participants in 36 prospective studies. During 1.3 million person-years of follow-up, 22,076 first-ever fatal or nonfatal vascular disease outcomes or nonvascular deaths were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta-analysis. Analyses excluded participants with known preexisting CHD or stroke at baseline.DATA SYNTHESIS:Lipoprotein(a) concentration was weakly correlated with several conventional vascular risk factors and it was highly consistent within individuals over several years. Associations of Lp(a) with CHD risk were broadly continuous in shape. In the 24 cohort studies, the rates of CHD in the top and bottom thirds of baseline Lp(a) distributions, respectively, were 5.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-5.9) per 1000 person-years and 4.4 (95% CI, 4.2-4.6) per 1000 person-years. The risk ratio for CHD, adjusted for age and sex only, was 1.16 (95% CI, 1.11-1.22) per 3.5-fold higher usual Lp(a) concentration (ie, per 1 SD), and it was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.09-1.18) following further adjustment for lipids and other conventional risk factors. The corresponding adjusted risk ratios were 1.10 (95% CI, 1.02-1.18) for ischemic stroke, 1.01 (95% CI, 0.98-1.05) for the aggregate of nonvascular mortality, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97-1.04) for cancer deaths, and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.95-1.06) for nonvascular deaths other than cancer.CONCLUSION:Under a wide range of circumstances, there are continuous, independent, and modest associations of Lp(a) concentration with risk of CHD and stroke that appear exclusive to vascular outcomes.
  •  
2.
  • Sarwar, Nadeem, et al. (författare)
  • Triglyceride-mediated pathways and coronary disease : collaborative analysis of 101 studies
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - 0140-6736. ; 375:9726, s. 1634-1639
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality.Methods: We assessed the −1131T>C (rs662799) promoter polymorphism of the apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene in relation to triglyceride concentration, several other risk factors, and risk of coronary heart disease. We compared disease risk for genetically-raised triglyceride concentration (20 842 patients with coronary heart disease, 35 206 controls) with that recorded for equivalent differences in circulating triglyceride concentration in prospective studies (302 430 participants with no history of cardiovascular disease; 12 785 incident cases of coronary heart disease during 2·79 million person-years at risk). We analysed −1131T>C in 1795 people without a history of cardiovascular disease who had information about lipoprotein concentration and diameter obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.Findings: The minor allele frequency of −1131T>C was 8% (95% CI 7–9). −1131T>C was not significantly associated with several non-lipid risk factors or LDL cholesterol, and it was modestly associated with lower HDL cholesterol (mean difference per C allele 3·5% [95% CI 2·6–4·6]; 0·053 mmol/L [0·039–0·068]), lower apolipoprotein AI (1·3% [0·3–2·3]; 0·023 g/L [0·005–0·041]), and higher apolipoprotein B (3·2% [1·3–5·1]; 0·027 g/L [0·011–0·043]). By contrast, for every C allele inherited, mean triglyceride concentration was 16·0% (95% CI 12·9–18·7), or 0·25 mmol/L (0·20–0·29), higher (p=4·4×10−24). The odds ratio for coronary heart disease was 1·18 (95% CI 1·11–1·26; p=2·6×10−7) per C allele, which was concordant with the hazard ratio of 1·10 (95% CI 1·08–1·12) per 16% higher triglyceride concentration recorded in prospective studies. −1131T>C was significantly associated with higher VLDL particle concentration (mean difference per C allele 12·2 nmol/L [95% CI 7·7–16·7]; p=9·3×10−8) and smaller HDL particle size (0·14 nm [0·08–0·20]; p=7·0×10−5), factors that could mediate the effects of triglyceride.Interpretation: These data are consistent with a causal association between triglyceride-mediated pathways and coronary heart disease.Funding: British Heart Foundation, UK Medical Research Council, Novartis.
  •  
3.
  • Wormser, David, et al. (författare)
  • Adult height and the risk of cause-specific death and vascular morbidity in 1 million people : individual participant meta-analysis
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - 0300-5771. ; 41:5, s. 1419-1433
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BackgroundThe extent to which adult height, a biomarker of the interplay of genetic endowment and early-life experiences, is related to risk of chronic diseases in adulthood is uncertain.MethodsWe calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for height, assessed in increments of 6.5 cm, using individual-participant data on 174 374 deaths or major non-fatal vascular outcomes recorded among 1 085 949 people in 121 prospective studies.ResultsFor people born between 1900 and 1960, mean adult height increased 0.5-1 cm with each successive decade of birth. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking and year of birth, HRs per 6.5 cm greater height were 0.97 (95% confidence interval: 0.96-0.99) for death from any cause, 0.94 (0.93-0.96) for death from vascular causes, 1.04 (1.03-1.06) for death from cancer and 0.92 (0.90-0.94) for death from other causes. Height was negatively associated with death from coronary disease, stroke subtypes, heart failure, stomach and oral cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mental disorders, liver disease and external causes. In contrast, height was positively associated with death from ruptured aortic aneurysm, pulmonary embolism, melanoma and cancers of the pancreas, endocrine and nervous systems, ovary, breast, prostate, colorectum, blood and lung. HRs per 6.5 cm greater height ranged from 1.26 (1.12-1.42) for risk of melanoma death to 0.84 (0.80-0.89) for risk of death from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. HRs were not appreciably altered after further adjustment for adiposity, blood pressure, lipids, inflammation biomarkers, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption or socio-economic indicators.ConclusionAdult height has directionally opposing relationships with risk of death from several different major causes of chronic diseases.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-3 av 3
 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy