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Sökning: WAKA:ref > Lissner Lauren 1956 > Lappas Georg 1962 > Göteborgs universitet

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1.
  • Berg, Christina, 1963-, et al. (författare)
  • Trends in blood lipid levels, blood pressure, alcohol and smoking habits from 1985 to 2002: results from INTERGENE and GOT-MONICA.
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology. - 1741-8267. ; 12:2, s. 115-25
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Favourable trends in cardiovascular disease have been observed in Sweden. The aim of this study was to study secular trends in a variety of cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: Total-, low-density (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) serum cholesterol; serum triglycerides; systolic and diastolic blood pressure; self-reported smoking and alcohol consumption were studied in repeated cross-sectional surveys. Data from four population-based samples in Goteborg, Sweden were used-WHO MONICA project 1985, 1990 and 1995, and INTERGENE 2002. A total of 2931 females and 2691 males aged 25-64 consisting of 1021-1624 randomly selected subjects at each survey period participated. RESULTS: Serum cholesterol levels showed downward trends but the decline in both total- and LDL-cholesterol seems to be levelling off from 1995 and onwards. No significant changes were observed in serum triglyceride, HDL-serum cholesterol or blood pressure levels. The majority of the participants had higher total- and LDL-serum cholesterol levels than currently recommended. Antihypertensive medical treatment increased in women and the oldest men. The prevalence of smoking decreased from 39 to 25% in women and 35 to 20% in men respectively from 1985-2002. In contrast, the prevalence of subjects consuming strong beer and wine, respectively, at least once a week almost doubled from 1990-2002. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiovascular risk factor patterns change continuously and need to be monitored. The favourable trends in LDL-serum cholesterol and smoking in the Goteborg surveys were paralleled by less favourable trends in being overweight and alcohol consumption.
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2.
  • Berg, Christina, 1963-, et al. (författare)
  • Trends in overweight and obesity from 1985 to 2002 in Göteborg, West Sweden.
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: International journal of obesity (2005). - 0307-0565. ; 29:8, s. 916
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: To study secular trends in overweight and selected correlates in men and women in Göteborg, Sweden. DESIGN: Cross-sequential population-based surveys. SUBJECTS: A total of 2931 female and 2691 male subjects aged 25-64 y participated in WHO MONICA surveys (1985, 1990, 1995) and the INTERGENE study (2002). MEASUREMENTS: Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), prevalence of overweight (BMI> or =25 kg/m(2)), and obesity (BMI> or =30 kg/m(2)). RESULTS: Mean body weight increased by 3.3 kg for women and 5 kg for men, with a significant upward trend for BMI in men but not women over the 17-y observation period. The prevalence of overweight and obesity increased significantly in both sexes over the period. The largest increase was observed in men, and in women aged 25-34 y. In 2002, the prevalence of overweight was 38% in women and 58% in men, and the prevalence of obesity was 11% in women and 15% in men. No significant secular trends were observed for WHR, but there was an upward trend in prevalence of WHR>0.85 in women. A decreased prevalence of smoking in both sexes was observed together with an increase in reported leisure time physical activity. No significant secular trends were observed in rates of self-reported diabetes, although the risk of diabetes attributable to obesity was 24%. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that 25-64-y-olds in the recent survey were more overweight and obese than earlier studied MONICA participants. The increase in BMI was more pronounced in men while abdominal obesity increased principally in women. Although obesity and overweight are clearly important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, the number of diabetics remains low and any secular increase is not yet apparent.
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3.
  • Zhou, Bin, et al. (författare)
  • Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980 : a pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4.4 million participants
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - 0140-6736. ; 387:10027, s. 1513-1530
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background One of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age-standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are affecting the number of adults with diabetes. Methods We pooled data from population-based studies that had collected data on diabetes through measurement of its biomarkers. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends in diabetes prevalence-defined as fasting plasma glucose of 7.0 mmol/L or higher, or history of diagnosis with diabetes, or use of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs-in 200 countries and territories in 21 regions, by sex and from 1980 to 2014. We also calculated the posterior probability of meeting the global diabetes target if post-2000 trends continue. Findings We used data from 751 studies including 4 372 000 adults from 146 of the 200 countries we make estimates for. Global age-standardised diabetes prevalence increased from 4.3% (95% credible interval 2.4-7.0) in 1980 to 9.0% (7.2-11.1) in 2014 in men, and from 5.0% (2.9-7.9) to 7.9% (6.4-9.7) in women. The number of adults with diabetes in the world increased from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (28.5% due to the rise in prevalence, 39.7% due to population growth and ageing, and 31.8% due to interaction of these two factors). Age-standardised adult diabetes prevalence in 2014 was lowest in northwestern Europe, and highest in Polynesia and Micronesia, at nearly 25%, followed by Melanesia and the Middle East and north Africa. Between 1980 and 2014 there was little change in age-standardised diabetes prevalence in adult women in continental western Europe, although crude prevalence rose because of ageing of the population. By contrast, age-standardised adult prevalence rose by 15 percentage points in men and women in Polynesia and Micronesia. In 2014, American Samoa had the highest national prevalence of diabetes (>30% in both sexes), with age-standardised adult prevalence also higher than 25% in some other islands in Polynesia and Micronesia. If post-2000 trends continue, the probability of meeting the global target of halting the rise in the prevalence of diabetes by 2025 at the 2010 level worldwide is lower than 1% for men and is 1% for women. Only nine countries for men and 29 countries for women, mostly in western Europe, have a 50% or higher probability of meeting the global target. Interpretation Since 1980, age-standardised diabetes prevalence in adults has increased, or at best remained unchanged, in every country. Together with population growth and ageing, this rise has led to a near quadrupling of the number of adults with diabetes worldwide. The burden of diabetes, both in terms of prevalence and number of adults affected, has increased faster in low-income and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Funding Wellcome Trust. Copyright (C) NCD Risk Factor Collaboration. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY.
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