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Sökning: WFRF:(Aly Markus)

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1.
  • Ademuyiwa, Adesoji O., et al. (författare)
  • Determinants of morbidity and mortality following emergency abdominal surgery in children in low-income and middle-income countries
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: BMJ Global Health. - : BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. - 2059-7908. ; 1:4
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Child health is a key priority on the global health agenda, yet the provision of essential and emergency surgery in children is patchy in resource-poor regions. This study was aimed to determine the mortality risk for emergency abdominal paediatric surgery in low-income countries globally.Methods: Multicentre, international, prospective, cohort study. Self-selected surgical units performing emergency abdominal surgery submitted prespecified data for consecutive children aged <16 years during a 2-week period between July and December 2014. The United Nation's Human Development Index (HDI) was used to stratify countries. The main outcome measure was 30-day postoperative mortality, analysed by multilevel logistic regression.Results: This study included 1409 patients from 253 centres in 43 countries; 282 children were under 2 years of age. Among them, 265 (18.8%) were from low-HDI, 450 (31.9%) from middle-HDI and 694 (49.3%) from high-HDI countries. The most common operations performed were appendectomy, small bowel resection, pyloromyotomy and correction of intussusception. After adjustment for patient and hospital risk factors, child mortality at 30 days was significantly higher in low-HDI (adjusted OR 7.14 (95% CI 2.52 to 20.23), p<0.001) and middle-HDI (4.42 (1.44 to 13.56), p=0.009) countries compared with high-HDI countries, translating to 40 excess deaths per 1000 procedures performed.Conclusions: Adjusted mortality in children following emergency abdominal surgery may be as high as 7 times greater in low-HDI and middle-HDI countries compared with high-HDI countries. Effective provision of emergency essential surgery should be a key priority for global child health agendas.
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2.
  • Dadaev, Tokhir, et al. (författare)
  • Fine-mapping of prostate cancer susceptibility loci in a large meta-analysis identifies candidate causal variants.
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: ; 9:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Prostate cancer is a polygenic disease with a large heritable component. A number of common, low-penetrance prostate cancer risk loci have been identified through GWAS. Here we apply the Bayesian multivariate variable selection algorithm JAM to fine-map 84 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, using summary data from a large European ancestry meta-analysis. We observe evidence for multiple independent signals at 12 regions and 99 risk signals overall. Only 15 original GWAS tag SNPs remain among the catalogue of candidate variants identified; the remainder are replaced by more likely candidates. Biological annotation of our credible set of variants indicates significant enrichment within promoter and enhancer elements, and transcription factor-binding sites, including AR, ERG and FOXA1. In 40 regions at least one variant is colocalised with an eQTL in prostate cancer tissue. The refined set of candidate variants substantially increase the proportion of familial relative risk explained by these known susceptibility regions, which highlights the importance of fine-mapping studies and has implications for clinical risk profiling.
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  • Jäderling, Fredrik, et al. (författare)
  • Preoperative staging using magnetic resonance imaging and risk of positive surgical margins after prostate-cancer surgery
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1365-7852 .- 1476-5608. ; 22:3, s. 391-398
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: It is unclear whether preoperative staging using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) reduces the risk of positive margins in prostate cancer. We aimed to assess the effect on surgical margins and degree of nerve sparing of a pelvic MRI presented at a preoperative MRI conference. Methods: Single institution, observational cohort study including 1037 men that underwent robot assisted radical prostatectomy between October 2013 and June 2015. Of these, 557 underwent a preoperative MRI combined with a preoperative MRI conference and 410 did not. With whole-mount prostate specimen histopathology as gold standard we assessed the ability of MRI in finding the index tumor and the sensitivity and specificity for extra prostatic extension. We calculated relative risks for positive surgical margins and non-nerve sparing procedure, adjusting for preoperative risk factors using stabilized inverse-probability weighting. Results: MRI detected the index tumor in 80% of the cases. Non-organ confined disease (pT3) at histology was present in the MRI and the non-MRI group in 42% and 24%, respectively. Rate of positive surgical margins comparing the MRI and non-MRI groups was 26.7% and 33.7%, respectively, relative risk 0.79 [95% CI 0.65-0.96], weighted relative risk (wRR) 0.69 [95% CI 0.55-0.86]. The wRR of extensive positive surgical margins was 0.45 [95% CI 0.31-0.67]. Undergoing MRI was also associated with an increased risk of being operated with a non-nerve sparing technique (wRR, 1.84 [95% CI 1.11-3.03]). Conclusions: Our study suggests that preoperative prostate MRI in combination with a preoperative MRI conference affects the degree of nerve-sparing surgery and reduces positive surgical margins.
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5.
  • Kar, Siddhartha P., et al. (författare)
  • Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by at Least Two Cancer Types
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: ; 6:9, s. 1052-1067
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis, but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P < 10 -8 seven new cross-cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type-specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P < 10(-5) in the three-cancer meta-analysis. SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that combining large-scale GWA meta-analysis findings across cancer types can identify completely new risk loci common to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. We show that the identification of such cross-cancer risk loci has the potential to shed new light on the shared biology underlying these hormone-related cancers. (C) 2016 AACR.
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6.
  • Lophatananon, Artitaya, et al. (författare)
  • Height, selected genetic markers and prostate cancer risk : results from the PRACTICAL consortium.
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Cancer. - 0007-0920 .- 1532-1827. ; 117:5, s. 734-743
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Evidence on height and prostate cancer risk is mixed, however, recent studies with large data sets support a possible role for its association with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.METHODS: We analysed data from the PRACTICAL consortium consisting of 6207 prostate cancer cases and 6016 controls and a subset of high grade cases (2480 cases). We explored height, polymorphisms in genes related to growth processes as main effects and their possible interactions.RESULTS: The results suggest that height is associated with high-grade prostate cancer risk. Men with height >180 cm are at a 22% increased risk as compared to men with height <173 cm (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.48). Genetic variants in the growth pathway gene showed an association with prostate cancer risk. The aggregate scores of the selected variants identified a significantly increased risk of overall prostate cancer and high-grade prostate cancer by 13% and 15%, respectively, in the highest score group as compared to lowest score group.CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of gene-environment interaction between height and the selected candidate SNPs.Our findings suggest a role of height in high-grade prostate cancer. The effect of genetic variants in the genes related to growth is seen in all cases and high-grade prostate cancer. There is no interaction between these two exposures.
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  • Porserud, Andrea, et al. (författare)
  • Objectively measured mobilisation is enhanced by a new behaviour support tool in patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Surgical Oncology. - 0748-7983 .- 1532-2157. ; 45:10, s. 1847-1853
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • INTRODUCTION: Mobilisation reduces the risk of complications after abdominal surgery. Despite that, patients spend most of their time immobilised during hospital stay. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate a tool called the Activity board, which includes behaviour change techniques, regarding effects on mobilisation and postoperative recovery after abdominal cancer surgery.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients who were planned for abdominal surgery due to colorectal, ovarian or urinary bladder cancer, and at least three postoperative days at Karolinska University Hospital were included in this non-randomised controlled trial, from January 2017 to May 2018. The patients were allocated to Activity board or standard treatment when they were admitted to hospital. Mobilisation was evaluated objectively with activity monitor the first three postoperative days, and postoperative recovery was assessed continuously during hospital stay.RESULTS: In total, 133 patients, mean (sd) age 68.1 (12.3) years were included. The patients with the Activity board had postoperatively higher levels of mobilisation, compared to standard treatment, as mean value over the first three days, steps, median (min-max) 1057 (3-10433) and 360 (0-6546), respectively (p = 0.001), and for each day separately. Further, the group with the Activity board had a shorter length of stay, 6 (3-13), compared to standard treatment 7 (3-14) (p = 0.027).CONCLUSION: The Activity board is an effective tool to enhance mobilisation after abdominal surgery due to cancer, in hospital settings. Using the Activity board could lead to improved postoperative recovery.
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  • Szulkin, Robert, et al. (författare)
  • Prediction of individual genetic risk to prostate cancer using a polygenic score.
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The Prostate. - 0270-4137 .- 1097-0045. ; 75:13, s. 1467-74
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Polygenic risk scores comprising established susceptibility variants have shown to be informative classifiers for several complex diseases including prostate cancer. For prostate cancer it is unknown if inclusion of genetic markers that have so far not been associated with prostate cancer risk at a genome-wide significant level will improve disease prediction.METHODS: We built polygenic risk scores in a large training set comprising over 25,000 individuals. Initially 65 established prostate cancer susceptibility variants were selected. After LD pruning additional variants were prioritized based on their association with prostate cancer. Six-fold cross validation was performed to assess genetic risk scores and optimize the number of additional variants to be included. The final model was evaluated in an independent study population including 1,370 cases and 1,239 controls.RESULTS: The polygenic risk score with 65 established susceptibility variants provided an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.67. Adding an additional 68 novel variants significantly increased the AUC to 0.68 (P = 0.0012) and the net reclassification index with 0.21 (P = 8.5E-08). All novel variants were located in genomic regions established as associated with prostate cancer risk.CONCLUSIONS: Inclusion of additional genetic variants from established prostate cancer susceptibility regions improves disease prediction.
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