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Sökning: WFRF:(Amini RM)

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1.
  • Aaltonen, Kirsimari, et al. (författare)
  • Cyclin D1 expression is associated with poor prognostic features in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. - Springer. - 1573-7217. ; 113:1, s. 75-82
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Cyclins D1 and E play an important role in breast carcinogenesis. High cyclin E expression is common in hormone receptor negative and high grade aggressive breast cancer, whereas cyclin D1 in hormone receptor positive and low grade breast cancer. Experimental data has suggested that cyclin D1 and E mediate cell proliferation by different mechanisms in estrogen receptor (ER) positive and negative breast cancer. To test this hypotheses in large breast cancer material and to clarify the histopathological correlations of cyclin E and D1, especially the association with proliferation, we analyzed cyclin E and D1 immunohistochemical expression on breast tumour microarrays consisting of 1348 invasive breast cancers. High cyclin D1 expression was associated with high grade (P < 0.0005), high cyclin A (P < 0.0005) and Ki67 (P < 0.0005) expression among ER positive but with low grade (P = 0.05) and low Ki67 (P = 0.01) expression among ER negative breast cancers. Cyclin E and D1 expression correlated positively in ER positive (P < 0.0005) but had a negative correlation in ER negative tumours (P = 0.004). Cyclin E associated with high grade among all tumours (P < 0.0005). In conclusion, the findings of this study show that cyclin D1 has separate roles, and proliferation is driven by different mechanisms in ER positive and negative breast cancers.
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2.
  • Ahlin, Cecilia, et al. (författare)
  • Cyclin A Is a Proliferative Marker with Good Prognostic Value in Node-Negative Breast Cancer.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology. - American Association for Cancer Research. - 1538-7755. ; 18, s. 2501-2506
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Proliferative markers are not recommended as prognostic factors for clinical use in breast cancer due to lack of standardization in methodology. However, proliferation is driving several gene expression signatures emphasizing the need for a reliable proliferative marker for clinical use. Studies suggest that cyclin A is a prognostic marker with satisfying reproducibility. We investigated cyclin A as a prognostic marker in node-negative breast cancer using previously defined cutoff values. Patients and METHODS: In a case-control study, we defined 190 women who died from breast cancer as cases and 190 women alive at the time for the corresponding case's death as controls. Inclusion criteria were tumor size </=50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no adjuvant chemotherapy. Tumor tissues were immunostained for cyclin A using commercially available antibodies. RESULTS: We found a statistically significant association between expression of cyclin A and breast cancer death in a univariate model: odds ratio for cyclin A(ave) 2.7 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.7-4.3] and cyclin A(max) 3.4 (CI, 2.1-5.5). Corresponding odds ratio for Ki67 were Ki67(ave) 1.9 (CI, 1.2-3.1) and Ki67(max) 1.7 (CI, 1.1-2.7) and for grade 3.1 (CI, 1.8-5.1). Cyclin A was strongly correlated to Ki67 and grade why a model including all was not appropriate. CONCLUSIONS: Cyclin A is a prognostic factor for breast cancer death in node-negative patients using standardized methodology regarding scoring and cutoff values. Adding cyclin A as a proliferative marker to established clinicopathologic factors will improve the separation of low and high risk breast cancer. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(9):2501-6).
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3.
  • Bergfelt, Emma, et al. (författare)
  • Satisfactory outcome after intensive chemotherapy with pragmatic use of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring in older patients with Philadelphia-negative B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a Swedish registry-based study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Medical Oncology. - Humana Press. - 1559-131X. ; 32:4, s. 135-135
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The introduction of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring, in the Swedish national guidelines for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, was evaluated in 35 patients aged 46-79 years (median 61), who were diagnosed from 2007 to 2011 and treated with high-intensity, block-based chemotherapy (ABCDV/VABA induction). Both a high complete remission rate (91 %) and acceptable overall survival (OS) rate (47 %) at 5 years were achieved. MRD by flow cytometry was measured in 73 % of the patients reaching complete remission after the first course, but was omitted by the clinicians for eight patients who were either over 70 years of age or already met conventional high-risk criteria. Factors negatively influencing OS were age over 65 years and WHO status >= 2. MRD < 0.1 % after induction had positive impact on continuous complete remission but not on OS. Only five patients were allocated to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission, mainly due to conventional high risk factors. Thus, use of intensive remission induction therapy is effective in a selection of older patients. In a population for whom the possibilities of treatment escalation are limited, the optimal role of MRD monitoring remains to be determined.
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5.
  • Collaboration Global Burden of Disease, et al. (författare)
  • Measuring progress from 1990 to 2017 and projecting attainment to 2030 of the health-related Sustainable Development Goals for 195 countries and territories: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - 1474-547X .- 0140-6736. ; s. 2091-2138
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Efforts to establish the 2015 baseline and monitor early implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) highlight both great potential for and threats to improving health by 2030. To fully deliver on the SDG aim of “leaving no one behind”, it is increasingly important to examine the health-related SDGs beyond national-level estimates. As part of the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2017 (GBD 2017), we measured progress on 41 of 52 health-related SDG indicators and estimated the health-related SDG index for 195 countries and territories for the period 1990–2017, projected indicators to 2030, and analysed global attainment. Methods: We measured progress on 41 health-related SDG indicators from 1990 to 2017, an increase of four indicators since GBD 2016 (new indicators were health worker density, sexual violence by non-intimate partners, population census status, and prevalence of physical and sexual violence [reported separately]). We also improved the measurement of several previously reported indicators. We constructed national-level estimates and, for a subset of health-related SDGs, examined indicator-level differences by sex and Socio-demographic Index (SDI) quintile. We also did subnational assessments of performance for selected countries. To construct the health-related SDG index, we transformed the value for each indicator on a scale of 0–100, with 0 as the 2·5th percentile and 100 as the 97·5th percentile of 1000 draws calculated from 1990 to 2030, and took the geometric mean of the scaled indicators by target. To generate projections through 2030, we used a forecasting framework that drew estimates from the broader GBD study and used weighted averages of indicator-specific and country-specific annualised rates of change from 1990 to 2017 to inform future estimates. We assessed attainment of indicators with defined targets in two ways: first, using mean values projected for 2030, and then using the probability of attainment in 2030 calculated from 1000 draws. We also did a global attainment analysis of the feasibility of attaining SDG targets on the basis of past trends. Using 2015 global averages of indicators with defined SDG targets, we calculated the global annualised rates of change required from 2015 to 2030 to meet these targets, and then identified in what percentiles the required global annualised rates of change fell in the distribution of country-level rates of change from 1990 to 2015. We took the mean of these global percentile values across indicators and applied the past rate of change at this mean global percentile to all health-related SDG indicators, irrespective of target definition, to estimate the equivalent 2030 global average value and percentage change from 2015 to 2030 for each indicator. Findings: The global median health-related SDG index in 2017 was 59·4 (IQR 35·4–67·3), ranging from a low of 11·6 (95% uncertainty interval 9·6–14·0) to a high of 84·9 (83·1–86·7). SDG index values in countries assessed at the subnational level varied substantially, particularly in China and India, although scores in Japan and the UK were more homogeneous. Indicators also varied by SDI quintile and sex, with males having worse outcomes than females for non-communicable disease (NCD) mortality, alcohol use, and smoking, among others. Most countries were projected to have a higher health-related SDG index in 2030 than in 2017, while country-level probabilities of attainment by 2030 varied widely by indicator. Under-5 mortality, neonatal mortality, maternal mortality ratio, and malaria indicators had the most countries with at least 95% probability of target attainment. Other indicators, including NCD mortality and suicide mortality, had no countries projected to meet corresponding SDG targets on the basis of projected mean values for 2030 but showed some probability of attainment by 2030. For some indicators, including child malnutrition, several infectious diseases, and most violence measures, the annualised rates of change required to meet SDG targets far exceeded the pace of progress achieved by any country in the recent past. We found that applying the mean global annualised rate of change to indicators without defined targets would equate to about 19% and 22% reductions in global smoking and alcohol consumption, respectively; a 47% decline in adolescent birth rates; and a more than 85% increase in health worker density per 1000 population by 2030. Interpretation: The GBD study offers a unique, robust platform for monitoring the health-related SDGs across demographic and geographic dimensions. Our findings underscore the importance of increased collection and analysis of disaggregated data and highlight where more deliberate design or targeting of interventions could accelerate progress in attaining the SDGs. Current projections show that many health-related SDG indicators, NCDs, NCD-related risks, and violence-related indicators will require a concerted shift away from what might have driven past gains—curative interventions in the case of NCDs—towards multisectoral, prevention-oriented policy action and investments to achieve SDG aims. Notably, several targets, if they are to be met by 2030, demand a pace of progress that no country has achieved in the recent past. The future is fundamentally uncertain, and no model can fully predict what breakthroughs or events might alter the course of the SDGs. What is clear is that our actions—or inaction—today will ultimately dictate how close the world, collectively, can get to leaving no one behind by 2030.
6.
  • Dicker, D, et al. (författare)
  • Global, regional, and national age-sex-specific mortality and life expectancy, 1950-2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Lancet (London, England). - 1474-547X. ; 392:10159, s. 1684-1735
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Assessments of age-specific mortality and life expectancy have been done by the UN Population Division, Department of Economics and Social Affairs (UNPOP), the United States Census Bureau, WHO, and as part of previous iterations of the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD). Previous iterations of the GBD used population estimates from UNPOP, which were not derived in a way that was internally consistent with the estimates of the numbers of deaths in the GBD. The present iteration of the GBD, GBD 2017, improves on previous assessments and provides timely estimates of the mortality experience of populations globally.METHODS: The GBD uses all available data to produce estimates of mortality rates between 1950 and 2017 for 23 age groups, both sexes, and 918 locations, including 195 countries and territories and subnational locations for 16 countries. Data used include vital registration systems, sample registration systems, household surveys (complete birth histories, summary birth histories, sibling histories), censuses (summary birth histories, household deaths), and Demographic Surveillance Sites. In total, this analysis used 8259 data sources. Estimates of the probability of death between birth and the age of 5 years and between ages 15 and 60 years are generated and then input into a model life table system to produce complete life tables for all locations and years. Fatal discontinuities and mortality due to HIV/AIDS are analysed separately and then incorporated into the estimation. We analyse the relationship between age-specific mortality and development status using the Socio-demographic Index, a composite measure based on fertility under the age of 25 years, education, and income. There are four main methodological improvements in GBD 2017 compared with GBD 2016: 622 additional data sources have been incorporated; new estimates of population, generated by the GBD study, are used; statistical methods used in different components of the analysis have been further standardised and improved; and the analysis has been extended backwards in time by two decades to start in 1950.FINDINGS: Globally, 18·7% (95% uncertainty interval 18·4-19·0) of deaths were registered in 1950 and that proportion has been steadily increasing since, with 58·8% (58·2-59·3) of all deaths being registered in 2015. At the global level, between 1950 and 2017, life expectancy increased from 48·1 years (46·5-49·6) to 70·5 years (70·1-70·8) for men and from 52·9 years (51·7-54·0) to 75·6 years (75·3-75·9) for women. Despite this overall progress, there remains substantial variation in life expectancy at birth in 2017, which ranges from 49·1 years (46·5-51·7) for men in the Central African Republic to 87·6 years (86·9-88·1) among women in Singapore. The greatest progress across age groups was for children younger than 5 years; under-5 mortality dropped from 216·0 deaths (196·3-238·1) per 1000 livebirths in 1950 to 38·9 deaths (35·6-42·83) per 1000 livebirths in 2017, with huge reductions across countries. Nevertheless, there were still 5·4 million (5·2-5·6) deaths among children younger than 5 years in the world in 2017. Progress has been less pronounced and more variable for adults, especially for adult males, who had stagnant or increasing mortality rates in several countries. The gap between male and female life expectancy between 1950 and 2017, while relatively stable at the global level, shows distinctive patterns across super-regions and has consistently been the largest in central Europe, eastern Europe, and central Asia, and smallest in south Asia. Performance was also variable across countries and time in observed mortality rates compared with those expected on the basis of development.INTERPRETATION: This analysis of age-sex-specific mortality shows that there are remarkably complex patterns in population mortality across countries. The findings of this study highlight global successes, such as the large decline in under-5 mortality, which reflects significant local, national, and global commitment and investment over several decades. However, they also bring attention to mortality patterns that are a cause for concern, particularly among adult men and, to a lesser extent, women, whose mortality rates have stagnated in many countries over the time period of this study, and in some cases are increasing.FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
7.
  • Hasni, Muhammad Sharif, et al. (författare)
  • Estrogen receptor β1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma growth and as a prognostic biomarker
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Leukemia & Lymphoma. - Taylor & Francis. - 1042-8194. ; 58:2, s. 418-427
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) shows a higher incidence in males versus females. Epidemiological studies have shown that female gender is a favorable prognostic factor, which may be explained by estrogens. Here we show that when grafting human DLBCL cells to immunocompromised mice, tumor growth in males is faster. When treating mice grafted with either germinal center or activated B-cell like DLBCL cells with the selective estrogen receptor β (ERβ) agonist diarylpropionitrile, tumor growth was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, nuclear ERβ1 expression analysis in primary DLBCL’s by immunohistochemistry revealed expression in 89% of the cases. Nuclear ERβ1 expression was in a univariate and multivariate analysis, an independent prognostic factor for adverse progression-free survival in Rituximab-chemotherapy treated DLBCL (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively). These results suggest that estrogen signaling through ERβ1 is an interesting future therapeutic target for treatment of DLBCL, and that ERβ1 expression can be used as a prognostic marker.
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8.
  • Kozlowski, Piotr, et al. (författare)
  • High relapse rate of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults treated with Hyper-CVAD chemotherapy in Sweden
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Haematology. - Wiley-Blackwell. - 1600-0609. ; 92:5, s. 377-381
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Hyper-CVAD is widely used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and aggressive lymphomas. This multicenter, population-based study assessed the efficacy of Hyper-CVAD as first-line therapy in patients with T-cell ALL (T-ALL). Patients and methods Between October 2002 and September 2006, 24 patients were diagnosed with T-ALL in Sweden; 19 were eligible for treatment with the protocol. Results The median age was 32yr (range 18-72yr). Complete remission (CR) was obtained in 17 of 19 (89%) patients, and the treatment was relatively well tolerated. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) was recommended in high-risk disease and was performed in four patients upfront. Two- and 5-yr leukemia-free survivals (LFS) in 17 patients with CR achievement were identical, at 29% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8-51). Two- and 5-yr overall survival (OS) in whole cohort was 63% (95% CI: 42-85) and 47% (95% CI: 26-69), respectively. The 5-yr LFS for 15 patients who did not receive allogeneic SCT upfront were 20% (95% CI: 0-40), although 14 of 15 completed the protocol (eight cycles). Relapse occurred in 2 of 4 upfront-transplanted patients and in 12 of 15 patients treated with chemotherapy alone, six of whom received allogeneic SCT in CR2. Age >= 35yr influenced OS negatively in univariate analysis (HR 5.1, 95% CI: 1.55-16.7). Conclusions Hyper-CVAD treatment resulted in a high CR rate and appeared safe, but it showed poor efficacy at preventing relapse. Therefore, this treatment is no longer recommended for adults with T-ALL in Sweden.
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