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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Arfanakis Konstantinos) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Arfanakis Konstantinos)

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1.
  • Adams, Hieab H. H., et al. (författare)
  • Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Nature Neuroscience. - 1097-6256 .- 1546-1726. ; 19:12, s. 1569-1582
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (rho(genetic) = 0.748), which indicates a similar genetic background and allowed us to identify four additional loci through meta-analysis (N-combined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, and Parkinson's disease, and were enriched near genes involved in growth pathways, including PI3K-AKT signaling. These findings identify the biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and their link to physiological and pathological traits.
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2.
  • Dintica, Christina S., et al. (författare)
  • Impaired olfaction is associated with cognitive decline and neurodegeneration in the brain
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Neurology. - 0028-3878 .- 1526-632X. ; 92:7, s. e700-e709
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • ObjectiveWe aimed to examine whether impaired olfaction is associated with cognitive decline and indicators of neurodegeneration in the brain of dementia-free older adults.MethodsWithin the Rush Memory and Aging Project, 380 dementia-free participants (mean age = 78 years) were followed for up to 15 years, and underwent MRI scans. Olfactory function was assessed using the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) at baseline, and categorized as anosmia (B-SIT <6), hyposmia (B-SIT 6-10 in men and 6-10.25 in women), and normal (B-SIT 10.25-12 in men and 10.5-12 in women). Cognitive function was annually assessed with a battery of 21 tests, from which composite scores were derived. Structural total and regional brain volumes were estimated. Data were analyzed using linear regression and mixed-effects models.ResultsAt study entry, 138 (36.3%) had normal olfactory function, 213 (56.1%) had hyposmia, and 29 (7.6%) had anosmia. In multiadjusted mixed-effects models, hyposmia (beta = -0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.05 to -0.02) and anosmia (beta = -0.13, 95% CI -0.16 to -0.09) were associated with faster rate of cognitive decline compared to normal olfaction. On MRI, impaired olfaction (hyposmia or anosmia) was related to smaller volumes of the hippocampus (beta = -0.19, 95% CI -0.33 to -0.05), and in the entorhinal (beta = -0.16, 95% CI -0.24 to -0.08), fusiform (beta = -0.45, 95% CI -0.78 to -0.14), and middle temporal (beta = -0.38, 95% CI -0.72 to -0.01) cortices.ConclusionImpaired olfaction predicts faster cognitive decline and might indicate neurodegeneration in the brain among dementia-free older adults.
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3.
  • Hibar, Derrek P., et al. (författare)
  • Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Nature Communications. - 2041-1723 .- 2041-1723. ; 8
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (r(g) = -0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness.
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4.
  • Satizabal, Claudia L., et al. (författare)
  • Genetic architecture of subcortical brain structures in 38,851 individuals
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 51:11, s. 1624-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Subcortical brain structures are integral to motion, consciousness, emotions and learning. We identified common genetic variation related to the volumes of the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, brainstem, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and thalamus, using genome-wide association analyses in almost 40,000 individuals from CHARGE, ENIGMA and UK Biobank. We show that variability in subcortical volumes is heritable, and identify 48 significantly associated loci (40 novel at the time of analysis). Annotation of these loci by utilizing gene expression, methylation and neuropathological data identified 199 genes putatively implicated in neurodevelopment, synaptic signaling, axonal transport, apoptosis, inflammation/infection and susceptibility to neurological disorders. This set of genes is significantly enriched for Drosophila orthologs associated with neurodevelopmental phenotypes, suggesting evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. Our findings uncover novel biology and potential drug targets underlying brain development and disease.
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5.
  • Nelson, Peter T., et al. (författare)
  • Limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (LATE) : consensus working group report
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Brain. - 0006-8950 .- 1460-2156. ; 142, s. 1503-1527
  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We describe a recently recognized disease entity, limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (LATE). LATE neuropathological change (LATE-NC) is defined by a stereotypical TDP-43 proteinopathy in older adults, with or without coexisting hippocampal sclerosis pathology. LATE-NC is a common TDP-43 proteinopathy, associated with an amnestic dementia syndrome that mimicked Alzheimer's-type dementia in retrospective autopsy studies. LATE is distinguished from frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology based on its epidemiology (LATE generally affects older subjects), and relatively restricted neuroanatomical distribution of TDP-43 proteinopathy. In community-based autopsy cohorts, similar to 25% of brains had sufficient burden of LATE-NC to be associated with discernible cognitive impairment. Many subjects with LATE-NC have comorbid brain pathologies, often including amyloid-beta plaques and tauopathy. Given that the oldest-old' are at greatest risk for LATE-NC, and subjects of advanced age constitute a rapidly growing demographic group in many countries, LATE has an expanding but under-recognized impact on public health. For these reasons, a working group was convened to develop diagnostic criteria for LATE, aiming both to stimulate research and to promote awareness of this pathway to dementia. We report consensus-based recommendations including guidelines for diagnosis and staging of LATE-NC. For routine autopsy workup of LATE-NC, an anatomically-based preliminary staging scheme is proposed with TDP-43 immunohistochemistry on tissue from three brain areas, reflecting a hierarchical pattern of brain involvement: amygdala, hippocampus, and middle frontal gyrus. LATE-NC appears to affect the medial temporal lobe structures preferentially, but other areas also are impacted. Neuroimaging studies demonstrated that subjects with LATE-NC also had atrophy in the medial temporal lobes, frontal cortex, and other brain regions. Genetic studies have thus far indicated five genes with risk alleles for LATE-NC: GRN, TMEM106B, ABCC9, KCNMB2, and APOE. The discovery of these genetic risk variants indicate that LATE shares pathogenetic mechanisms with both frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer's disease, but also suggests disease-specific underlying mechanisms. Large gaps remain in our understanding of LATE. For advances in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, there is an urgent need for research focused on LATE, including in vitro and animal models. An obstacle to clinical progress is lack of diagnostic tools, such as biofluid or neuroimaging biomarkers, for ante-mortem detection of LATE. Development of a disease biomarker would augment observational studies seeking to further define the risk factors, natural history, and clinical features of LATE, as well as eventual subject recruitment for targeted therapies in clinical trials.
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6.
  • Nelson, Peter T., et al. (författare)
  • Reply : LATE to the PART-y
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Brain. - : Oxford University Press. - 0006-8950 .- 1460-2156. ; 142
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)
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