SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Bevier Melanie) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Bevier Melanie)

  • Resultat 1-10 av 21
  • [1]23Nästa
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  • Bevier, Melanie, et al. (författare)
  • Does the time interval between first and last birth influence the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer?
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Cancer. - Elsevier. - 1879-0852. ; 47:4, s. 586-591
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Age at first and last birth and the number of children are known to influence the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancers. However, it remains unknown whether the difference in years between first and last childbirth plays a role. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database allowed us to carry out the largest study ever on reproductive factors in these cancers. Material and methods: We selected over 5.7 million women from the database. We estimated the effect of number of children, age at birth and difference between age at first and last birth by Poisson regression adjusted for age, period, region and socioeconomic status. Results: The risk for endometrial cancer is negatively associated with increasing number of children and increasing age at first as well as age at last birth. Weaker associations are found for ovarian cancer. Age at last birth is the factor that shows highest influence. A large difference in first and last childbirth shows a protective effect on the risk of endometrial cancer. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the risk of endometrial cancer is significantly decreased for women having at least a difference of 10 years between their first and last birth. Ovarian cancer does not seem to be influenced by the time interval between first and last birth. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  •  
2.
  • Bevier, Melanie, et al. (författare)
  • Incidence of cancer of unknown primary in Sweden: analysis by location of metastasis.
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Cancer Prevention. - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. - 1473-5709. ; 21:6, s. 596-601
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Increasing incidences of cancer of unknown primary (CUP) have been observed in Sweden previously. However, it is not known how the incidence trends for specific locations of metastasis vary. Site-specific data are available on the basis of the ninth international classification of diseases. CUP patients were identified between 1987 and 2008 from the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Malignant neoplasms of ill-defined sites were diagnosed in 4042 patients, 1976 developed metastasis in lymph nodes, 9615 had metastasis in specified organs, and in 8052 patients, the malignant neoplasm was diagnosed without further specification. Age-standardized incidence rates for 23 685 patients were analyzed using a direct method of standardization. Overall, the incidence of CUP decreased from 6.98 to 6.00 per 100 000 from 1987 to 2008. The number of patients diagnosed with metastasis in specified organs decreased, whereas the number of patients diagnosed with CUP without further specification increased from 2.65 to 3.02 per 100 000. With improvements in diagnostic methods and imaging techniques for identification of cancer, the incidences of CUP have been decreasing because primary tumors can be specified more often. Computed tomography is typically sensitive in detecting lung, kidney, and colorectal cancers, which are known to have a genetic link with CUP. Prostate-specific antigen testing is used to detect prostate cancer, for which bone is a common metastatic site. Liver metastases are common if the primary tumor is located in the colorectum. If the primary tumor is found, this cancer site replaces the diagnosis of CUP within the Cancer Register and therefore CUP incidence is decreased.
  •  
3.
  • Bevier, Melanie, et al. (författare)
  • Influence of family size and birth order on risk of cancer: a population-based study
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: BMC Cancer. - BioMed Central (BMC). - 1471-2407. ; 11
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Family size and birth order are known to influence the risk of some cancers. However, it is still unknown whether these effects change from early to later adulthood. We used the data of the Swedish Family Cancer Database to further analyze these effects. Methods: We selected over 5.7 million offspring with identified parents but no parental cancer. We estimated the effect of birth order and family size by Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, period, region and socioeconomic status. We divided the age at diagnosis in two groups, below and over 50 years, to identify the effect of family size and birth order for different age periods. Results: Negative associations for increasing birth order were found for endometrial, testicular, skin, thyroid and connective tissue cancers and melanoma. In contrast, we observed positive association between birth order and lung, male and female genital cancers. Family size was associated with decreasing risk for endometrial and testicular cancers, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma; risk was increased for leukemia and nervous system cancer. The effect of birth order decreased for lung and endometrial cancer from age at diagnosis below to over 50 years. Combined effects for birth order and family size were marginally significant for thyroid gland tumors. Especially, the relative risk for follicular thyroid gland tumors was significantly decreased for increasing birth order. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the effect of birth order decreases from early to late adulthood for lung and endometrial cancer.
4.
  • Bevier, Melanie, et al. (författare)
  • Risk of breast cancer in families of multiple affected women and men
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. - Springer. - 1573-7217. ; 132:2, s. 723-728
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Family history of first and second-degree relatives is known to increase the risk for breast cancer. Less data are available on the risks between defined multiple affected close and distant relatives for which the reliability of data may be an issue. Data on affected males are sparse. These questions and the probable genetic models were addressed in this study by means of a nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database. We estimated the effect of family history of breast cancer by Poisson regression for women of at least 30 years of age after adjusting for age, period, region, socioeconomic status, number of children, and age at first birth. The results of the study showed that relative risk (RR) for breast cancer was associated with a first degree as well as second-degree family history. Having at least two female affected first-degree relatives increased the RR at least to 2.8, favoring an additive interaction. The risk was increased around ten times in women with both parents affected. When either a father or a mother was affected, the RRs were nearly identical (RR = 1.73 and 1.74, respectively). The RR for a woman increased more when a brother was affected (RR = 2.48) compared to when a sister was affected (RR = 1.87). Having an affected grandmother showed lower familial excess risks than having an affected half sister (RR = 1.27, and 1.26; and RR = 1.39, and 1.50; respectively, for maternal and paternal relatives). We concluded that when both parents were diagnosed with breast cancer, the risk for the daughter was increased tenfold. Having an affected brother showed a somewhat higher risk than having an affected sister. The data suggest that male breast cancer has a higher genetic basis than female breast cancer, which invites further search of the underlying mechanisms.
  •  
5.
  • Hemminki, Kari, et al. (författare)
  • Site-specific cancer deaths in cancer of unknown primary diagnosed with lymph node metastasis may reveal hidden primaries.
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0020-7136.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) is a fatal cancer ranking among the five most common cancer deaths. CUP is diagnosed through metastases, which are limited to lymph nodes in some patients. Cause-specific survival data could guide the search for hidden primary tumors and help with therapeutic choices. The CUP patients were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry between 1987 and 2008; 1444 patients had only lymph node metastasis of defined histology (adenocarcinoma, squamous cell or undifferentiated). Site-specific cancer deaths were analyzed by lymph node location and histology. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared with metastatic primary cancer at related sites. Among the patients with metastasis to head and neck lymph nodes, 117 (59.1% of the specific cancer deaths) died of lung tumors. Patients with axillary lymph node metastasis died of lung and breast tumors in equal proportions (40.2% each). Also, squamous cell CUP in head and neck lymph nodes was mainly associated with lung tumor deaths (53.1%). With a few exceptions, survival of CUP patients with lymph node metastasis was indistinguishable from survival of patients with metastatic primary cancer originating from the organs drained by those nodes. The association between lymph node CUP metastases with cancer deaths in the drained organ and the superimposable survival kinetics suggests that drained organs host hidden primaries. Importantly, half of all site-specific cancer deaths (266/530) were due to lung tumors. Thus, an intense search should be mounted to find lung cancer in CUP patients with lymph node metastases.© 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  •  
6.
  • Huhn, Stefanie, et al. (författare)
  • Colorectal cancer risk and patients' survival: influence of polymorphisms in genes somatically mutated in colorectal tumors
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer. - 1573-7225. ; 25:6, s. 759-769
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The first two studies aiming for the high-throughput identification of the somatic mutation spectrum of colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors were published in 2006 and 2007. Using exome sequencing, they described 69 and 140 candidate cancer genes (CAN genes), respectively. We hypothesized that germline variants in these genes may influence CRC risk, similar to APC, which is causing CRC through germline and somatic mutations. After excluding the well-established CRC genes APC, KRAS, TP53, and ABCA1, we analyzed 35 potentially functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 CAN genes (OBSCN, MLL3, PKHD1, SYNE1, ERCC6, FBXW7, EPHB6/TRPV6, ELAC1/SMAD4, EPHA3, and ADAMTSL3) using KBiosciences Competitive AlleleaEuroSpecific PCR (TM) genotyping assays. In addition to CRC risk (1,399 CRC cases, 838 controls), we also considered the influence of the SNPs on patients' survival (406 cases). In spite of the fact that our in silico analyses suggested functional relevance for the studied genes and SNPs, our data did not support a strong influence of the studied germline variants on CRC risk and survival. The strongest association with CRC risk and survival was found for MLL3 (rs6464211, OR 1.50, p = 0.002, dominant model; HR 2.12, p = 0.020, recessive model). Two SNPs in EPHB6/TRPV6 (dominant model) showed marginal associations with survival (rs4987622 HR 0.58 p = 0.028 and rs6947538 HR 0.64, p = 0.036, respectively). Although somatic mutations in the CAN genes have been related to the development and progression of various types of cancers in several next-generation sequencing or expression analyses, our study suggests that the studied potentially functional germline variants are not likely to affect CRC risk or survival.
  •  
7.
  • Huhn, Stefanie, et al. (författare)
  • Shared ancestral susceptibility to colorectal cancer and other nutrition related diseases
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: BMC Medical Genetics. - BioMed Central (BMC). - 1471-2350. ; 13:94
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The majority of non-syndromic colorectal cancers (CRCs) can be described as a complex disease. A two-stage case-control study on CRC susceptibility was conducted to assess the influence of the ancestral alleles in the polymorphisms previously associated with nutrition-related complex diseases. Methods: In stage I, 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in a hospital-based Czech population (1025 CRC cases, 787 controls) using an allele-specific PCR-based genotyping system (KASPar (R)). In stage II, replication was carried out for the five SNPs with the lowest p values. The replication set consisted of 1798 CRC cases and 1810 controls from a population-based German study (DACHS). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between genotypes and CRC risk were estimated using logistic regression. To identify signatures of selection, Fay-Wu's H and Integrated Haplotype Score (iHS) were estimated. Results: In the Czech population, carriers of the ancestral alleles of AGT rs699 and CYP3A7 rs10211 showed an increased risk of CRC (OR 1.26 and 1.38, respectively; two-sided p <= 0.05), whereas carriers of the ancestral allele of ENPP1 rs1044498 had a decreased risk (OR 0.79; p <= 0.05). For rs1044498, the strongest association was detected in the Czech male subpopulation (OR 0.61; p=0.0015). The associations were not replicated in the German population. Signatures of selection were found for all three analyzed genes. Conclusions: Our study showed evidence of association for the ancestral alleles of polymorphisms in AGT and CYP3A7 and for the derived allele of a polymorphism in ENPP1 with an increased risk of CRC in Czechs, but not in Germans. The ancestral alleles of these SNPs have previously been associated with nutrition-related diseases hypertension (AGT and CYP3A7) and insulin resistance (ENPP1). Future studies may shed light on the complex genetic and environmental interactions between different types of nutrition-related diseases.
8.
  • Klimosch, Sascha N., et al. (författare)
  • Functional TLR5 Genetic Variants Affect Human Colorectal Cancer Survival
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Cancer Research. - American Association for Cancer Research Inc.. - 1538-7445. ; 73:24, s. 7232-7242
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Toll-like receptors (TLR) are overexpressed on many types of cancer cells, including colorectal cancer cells, but little is known about the functional relevance of these immune regulatory molecules in malignant settings. Here, we report frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the flagellin receptor TLR5 and the TLR downstream effector molecules MyD88 and TIRAP that are associated with altered survival in a large cohort of Caucasian patients with colorectal cancer (n = 613). MYD88 rs4988453, a SNP that maps to a promoter region shared with the acetyl coenzyme-A acyl-transferase-1 (ACAA1), was associated with decreased survival of patients with colorectal cancer and altered transcriptional activity of the proximal genes. In the TLR5 gene, rs5744174/F616L was associated with increased survival, whereas rs2072493/N592S was associated with decreased survival. Both rs2072493/N592S and rs5744174/F616L modulated TLR5 signaling in response to flagellin or to different commensal and pathogenic intestinal bacteria. Notably, we observed a reduction in flagellin-induced p38 phosphorylation, CD62L shedding, and elevated expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 beta mRNA in human primary immune cells from TLR5 616LL homozygote carriers, as compared with 616FF carriers. This finding suggested that the well-documented effect of cytokines like IL-6 on colorectal cancer progression might be mediated by TLR5 genotype-dependent flagellin sensing. Our results establish an important link between TLR signaling and human colorectal cancer with relevance for biomarker and therapy development. (C)2013 AACR.
  •  
9.
  • Lascorz, Jess, et al. (författare)
  • Association study identifying polymorphisms in CD47 and other extracellular matrix pathway genes as putative prognostic markers for colorectal cancer
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Colorectal Disease. - Springer. - 1432-1262. ; 28:2, s. 173-181
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We identified recently the extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor interaction pathway as a consistently overrepresented category among gene expression profiling studies on colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis. Putative regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes from the ECM pathway were genotyped in 613 CRC patients from Northern Germany (PopGen cohort) and tested for association with disease progression and survival. The eSNP (SNP associated with expression) rs12695175 in CD47 associated with CRC specific survival (HR = 2.18, 95 % CI 1.10-4.33, CC versus AA) and with overall survival (HR = 1.99, 95 % CI 1.04-3.81, CC versus AA). This association remained significant after adjustment for age at diagnosis, tumour stage (T) and lymph node status (N). Three polymorphisms in CD47 were associated with distant metastasis in a dominant model: rs9879947 and rs3206652 in the 3'-UTR (OR = 1.64, 95 % CI 1.01-2.64 and OR = 1.88, 95 % CI 1.27-2.80, respectively) and the eSNP rs3804639 (OR = 1.73, 95 % CI 1.17-2.57). The novel associations of eSNPs in CD47 with worse survival and distant metastasis should be confirmed by additional studies, since increased expression of this gene has recently been shown to be an indicator of poor prognosis in cancer patients.
  •  
10.
  • Lascorz, Jesus, et al. (författare)
  • Polymorphisms in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation chain genes as prognostic markers for colorectal cancer
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: BMC Medical Genetics. - BioMed Central (BMC). - 1471-2350. ; 13
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Currently, the TNM classification of malignant tumours based on clinicopathological staging remains the standard for colorectal cancer (CRC) prognostication. Recently, we identified the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation chain as a consistently overrepresented category in the published gene expression profiling (GEP) studies on CRC prognosis. Methods: We evaluated associations of putative regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes from the oxidative phosphorylation chain with survival and disease prognosis in 613 CRC patients from Northern Germany (PopGen cohort). Results: Two SNPs in the 3' untranslated region of UQCRB (complex III), rs7836698 and rs10504961, were associated with overall survival (HR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.32-0.85 and HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-0.99, for TT carriers). These associations were restricted to the group of patients with cancer located in the colon (HR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.22-0.82 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.83). Multivariate analysis indicated that both markers might act as independent prognostic markers. Additionally, the TT carriers were similar to 2 times more likely to develop tumours in the colon than in the rectum. Two SNPs in COX6B1 (complex IV) were associated with lymph node metastasis in a dominant model (rs6510502, OR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.20-2.57; rs10420252, OR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.11-2.53); rs6510502 was associated also with distant metastasis (OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.09-2.56 in a dominant model). Conclusions: This is the first report suggesting that markers in genes from the mitochondrial oxidative chain might be prognostic factors for CRC. Additional studies replicating the presented findings are needed.
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-10 av 21
  • [1]23Nästa
 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy