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Sökning: WFRF:(Bjørge Tone)

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1.
  • Lindkvist, Bjorn, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic risk factors for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma: a prospective study of 580 000 subjects within the Me-Can project
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: BMC Cancer. - BioMed Central (BMC). - 1471-2407. ; 14
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Obesity is associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and a decreased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, little is known about the risk of EAC and ESCC related to other metabolic risk factors. We aimed to examine the risk of EAC and ESCC in relation to metabolic risk factors, separately and combined in a prospective cohort study. Methods: The Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer cohort includes prospective cohorts in Austria, Norway and Sweden, with blood pressure, lipids, glucose and BMI available from 578 700 individuals. Relative risk (RR) for EAC and ESCC was calculated using Cox's proportional hazards analysis for metabolic risk factors categorized into quintiles and transformed into z-scores. The standardized sum of all z-scores was used as a composite score for the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Results: In total, 324 histologically verified cases of esophageal cancer were identified (114 EAC, 184 ESCC and 26 with other histology). BMI was associated with an increased risk of EAC (RR 7.34 (95% confidence interval, 2.88-18.7) top versus bottom quintile) and negatively associated with the risk of ESCC (RR 0.38 (0.23-0.62)). The mean value of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (mid blood pressure) was associated with the risk of ESCC (RR 1.77 (1.37-2.29)). The composite MetS score was associated with the risk of EAC (RR 1.56 (1.19-2.05) per one unit increase of z-score) but not ESCC. Conclusions: In accordance with previous studies, high BMI was associated with an increased risk of EAC and a decreased risk of ESCC. An association between high blood pressure and risk of ESCC was observed but alcohol consumption is a potential confounding factor that we were not able to adjust for in the analysis. The MetS was associated with EAC but not ESCC. However this association was largely driven by the strong association between BMI and EAC. We hypothesize that this association is more likely to be explained by factors directly related to obesity than the metabolic state of the MetS, considering that no other metabolic factor than BMI was associated with EAC.
2.
  • Almquist, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic factors and risk of thyroid cancer in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can).
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer. - 1573-7225. ; 22, s. 743-751
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: To investigate metabolic factors and their possible impact on risk of thyroid cancer. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted based on seven population-based cohorts in Norway, Austria, and Sweden, in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can). Altogether 578,700 men and women with a mean age of 44.0 years at baseline were followed for on average 12.0 years. Relative risk of incident thyroid cancer was assessed by levels of BMI, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and by a combined metabolic syndrome (MetS) score. Risk estimates were investigated for quintiles, and a z score distribution of exposures was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: During follow-up, 255 women and 133 men were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. In women, there was an inverse association between glucose and thyroid cancer risk, with adjusted RR: 95% CI was 0.61 (0.41-0.90), p trend = 0.02 in the fifth versus the first quintile, and a positive association between BMI and thyroid cancer risk with a significant trend over quintiles. There was no association between the other metabolic factors, single or combined (Met-S), and thyroid cancer. CONCLUSION: In women, BMI was positively, while blood glucose levels were inversely, associated with thyroid cancer.
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3.
  • Almquist, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic factors and risk of thyroid cancer in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can)
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer. - 0957-5243 .- 1573-7225. ; 22:5, s. 743-751
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Objective  To investigate metabolic factors and their possible impact on risk of thyroid cancer. Methods  A prospective cohort study was conducted based on seven population-based cohorts in Norway, Austria, and Sweden, in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can). Altogether 578,700 men and women with a mean age of 44.0 years at baseline were followed for on average 12.0 years. Relative risk of incident thyroid cancer was assessed by levels of BMI, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and by a combined metabolic syndrome (MetS) score. Risk estimates were investigated for quintiles, and a <em>z</em> score distribution of exposures was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results  During follow-up, 255 women and 133 men were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. In women, there was an inverse association between glucose and thyroid cancer risk, with adjusted RR: 95% CI was 0.61 (0.41–0.90), <em>p</em> trend = 0.02 in the fifth versus the first quintile, and a positive association between BMI and thyroid cancer risk with a significant trend over quintiles. There was no association between the other metabolic factors, single or combined (Met-S), and thyroid cancer. Conclusion  In women, BMI was positively, while blood glucose levels were inversely, associated with thyroid cancer.</p>
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4.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • BMI and weight changes and risk of obesity-related cancers : a pooled European cohort study
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - Oxford University Press. - 0300-5771 .- 1464-3685. ; 48:6, s. 1872-2885
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: Obesity is an established risk factor for several cancers. Adult weight gain has been associated with increased cancer risk, but studies on timing and duration of adult weight gain are relatively scarce. We examined the impact of BMI (body mass index) and weight changes over time, as well as the timing and duration of excess weight, on obesity- and non-obesity-related cancers.</p><p>Methods: We pooled health data from six European cohorts and included 221 274 individuals with two or more height and weight measurements during 1972–2014. Several BMI and weight measures were constructed. Cancer cases were identified through linkage with national cancer registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) of cancer with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived from time-dependent Cox-regression models.</p><p>Results: During follow-up, 27 881 cancer cases were diagnosed; 9761 were obesity-related. The HR of all obesity-related cancers increased with increasing BMI at first and last measurement, maximum BMI and longer duration of overweight (men only) and obesity. Participants who were overweight before age 40 years had an HR of obesity-related cancers of 1.16 (95% CI 1.02, 1.32) and 1.15 (95% CI 1.04, 1.27) in men and women, respectively, compared with those who were not overweight. The risk increase was particularly high for endometrial (70%), male renal-cell (58%) and male colon cancer (29%). No positive associations were seen for cancers not regarded as obesity-related.</p><p>Conclusions: Adult weight gain was associated with increased risk of several major cancers. The degree, timing and duration of overweight and obesity also seemed to be important. Preventing weight gain may reduce the cancer risk.</p>
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5.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • BMI and weight changes and risk of obesity-related cancers : a pooled European cohort study
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - 0300-5771 .- 1464-3685. ; 48:6, s. 1872-1885
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>BACKGROUND:</strong> Obesity is an established risk factor for several cancers. Adult weight gain has been associated with increased cancer risk, but studies on timing and duration of adult weight gain are relatively scarce. We examined the impact of BMI (body mass index) and weight changes over time, as well as the timing and duration of excess weight, on obesity- and non-obesity-related cancers.</p><p><strong>METHODS:</strong> We pooled health data from six European cohorts and included 221 274 individuals with two or more height and weight measurements during 1972-2014. Several BMI and weight measures were constructed. Cancer cases were identified through linkage with national cancer registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) of cancer with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived from time-dependent Cox-regression models.</p><p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> During follow-up, 27 881 cancer cases were diagnosed; 9761 were obesity-related. The HR of all obesity-related cancers increased with increasing BMI at first and last measurement, maximum BMI and longer duration of overweight (men only) and obesity. Participants who were overweight before age 40 years had an HR of obesity-related cancers of 1.16 (95% CI 1.02, 1.32) and 1.15 (95% CI 1.04, 1.27) in men and women, respectively, compared with those who were not overweight. The risk increase was particularly high for endometrial (70%), male renal-cell (58%) and male colon cancer (29%). No positive associations were seen for cancers not regarded as obesity-related.</p><p><strong>CONCLUSIONS:</strong> Adult weight gain was associated with increased risk of several major cancers. The degree, timing and duration of overweight and obesity also seemed to be important. Preventing weight gain may reduce the cancer risk.</p>
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6.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • BMI and weight changes and risk of obesity-related cancers : a pooled European cohort study
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - Oxford University Press. - 1464-3685. ; 48:6, s. 1872-1885
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Obesity is an established risk factor for several cancers. Adult weight gain has been associated with increased cancer risk, but studies on timing and duration of adult weight gain are relatively scarce. We examined the impact of BMI (body mass index) and weight changes over time, as well as the timing and duration of excess weight, on obesity- and non-obesity-related cancers. METHODS: We pooled health data from six European cohorts and included 221 274 individuals with two or more height and weight measurements during 1972-2014. Several BMI and weight measures were constructed. Cancer cases were identified through linkage with national cancer registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) of cancer with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived from time-dependent Cox-regression models. RESULTS: During follow-up, 27 881 cancer cases were diagnosed; 9761 were obesity-related. The HR of all obesity-related cancers increased with increasing BMI at first and last measurement, maximum BMI and longer duration of overweight (men only) and obesity. Participants who were overweight before age 40 years had an HR of obesity-related cancers of 1.16 (95% CI 1.02, 1.32) and 1.15 (95% CI 1.04, 1.27) in men and women, respectively, compared with those who were not overweight. The risk increase was particularly high for endometrial (70%), male renal-cell (58%) and male colon cancer (29%). No positive associations were seen for cancers not regarded as obesity-related. CONCLUSIONS: Adult weight gain was associated with increased risk of several major cancers. The degree, timing and duration of overweight and obesity also seemed to be important. Preventing weight gain may reduce the cancer risk.
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7.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic risk factors and ovarian cancer in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer project.
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - Oxford University Press. - 1464-3685. ; 40, s. 1667-1677
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: No studies have so far evaluated the impact of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as an entity on ovarian cancer risk. The authors aimed to examine the association between factors in the MetS, individually and combined, and risk of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality. METHODS: Altogether, 290 000 women from Austria, Norway and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements taken of height, weight, blood pressure and levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. Relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer were estimated using Cox regression for each MetS factor in quintiles and for standardized levels (z-scores), and for a composite z-score for the MetS. RRs were corrected for random error in measurements. RESULTS: During follow-up, 644 epithelial ovarian cancers and 388 deaths from ovarian cancer were identified. There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. Increasing levels of cholesterol [RR 1.52, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01-2.29, per 1-U increment of z-score] and blood pressure (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.12-2.86) conferred, however, increased risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. In women below the age of 50 years, there was increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality for MetS (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.00-2.30). Increasing levels of BMI (RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.37) conferred increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years. CONCLUSION: There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. However, increasing levels of cholesterol and blood pressure increased the risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. Increasing levels of BMI conferred an increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years.
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8.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic risk factors and ovarian cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - 0300-5771 .- 1464-3685. ; 40:6, s. 1667-1677
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>BACKGROUND: No studies have so far evaluated the impact of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as an entity on ovarian cancer risk. The authors aimed to examine the association between factors in the MetS, individually and combined, and risk of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality. METHODS: Altogether, 290 000 women from Austria, Norway and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements taken of height, weight, blood pressure and levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. Relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer were estimated using Cox regression for each MetS factor in quintiles and for standardized levels (z-scores), and for a composite z-score for the MetS. RRs were corrected for random error in measurements. RESULTS: During follow-up, 644 epithelial ovarian cancers and 388 deaths from ovarian cancer were identified. There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. Increasing levels of cholesterol [RR 1.52, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01-2.29, per 1-U increment of z-score] and blood pressure (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.12-2.86) conferred, however, increased risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. In women below the age of 50 years, there was increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality for MetS (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.00-2.30). Increasing levels of BMI (RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.37) conferred increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years. CONCLUSION: There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. However, increasing levels of cholesterol and blood pressure increased the risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. Increasing levels of BMI conferred an increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years.</p>
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9.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic syndrome and breast cancer in the me-can (metabolic syndrome and cancer) project.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. - 1055-9965 .- 1538-7755. ; 19:7, s. 1737-1745
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>BACKGROUND: Few studies have assessed the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as an entity in relation to breast cancer risk, and results have been inconsistent. We aimed to examine the association between MetS factors (individually and combined) and risk of breast cancer incidence and mortality. METHODS: Two hundred ninety thousand women from Austria, Norway, and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, and levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Relative risks (RR) of breast cancer were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression for each MetS factor in quintiles and for standardized levels (z-scores) and for a composite z-score for the MetS. RESULTS: There were 4,862 incident cases of breast cancer and 633 deaths from breast cancer identified. In women below age 50, there was a decreased risk of incident cancer for the MetS (per 1-unit increment of z-score; RR, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.90) as well as for the individual factors (except for glucose). The lowest risks were seen among the heaviest women. In women above age 60, there was an increased risk of breast cancer mortality for the MetS (RR, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.45) and for blood pressure and glucose. The strongest association with mortality was seen for increased glucose concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: The MetS was associated with a decreased risk of incident breast cancer in women below age 50 with high body mass index, and with an increased risk of breast cancer mortality in women above 60. IMPACT: Lifestyle interventions as recommended for cardiovascular disease prevention may be of value to prevent breast cancer mortality in postmenopausal women.</p>
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10.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic syndrome and endometrial carcinoma
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Epidemiology. - 0002-9262 .- 1476-6256. ; 171:8, s. 892-902
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>The authors examined the association between the metabolic syndrome and risk of incident endometrial and fatal uterine corpus cancer within a large prospective cohort study. Approximately 290,000 women from Austria, Norway, and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements of height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and circulating levels of glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Relative risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. The metabolic syndrome was assessed as a composite z score, as the standardized sum of z scores for body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. A total of 917 endometrial carcinomas and 129 fatal cancers were identified. Increased risks of incident endometrial carcinoma and fatal uterine corpus cancer were seen for the metabolic syndrome factors combined, as well as for individual factors (except for cholesterol). The relative risk of endometrial carcinoma for the metabolic syndrome was 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.28, 1.46) per 1-unit increment of z score. The positive associations between metabolic syndrome factors (both individually and combined) and endometrial carcinoma were confined to the heaviest women. The association between the metabolic syndrome and endometrial carcinoma risk seems to go beyond the risk conferred by obesity alone, particularly in women with a high body mass index.</p>
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