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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Calvert P) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Calvert P)

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  • Anker, S. D., et al. (författare)
  • The importance of patient-reported outcomes: a call for their comprehensive integration in cardiovascular clinical trials
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: European Heart Journal. - 0195-668X. ; 35:30, s. 2001-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), or patient perceived health status, are reported directly by the patient and are powerful tools to inform patients, clinicians, and policy-makers about morbidity and 'patient suffering', especially in chronic diseases. Patient-reported outcomes provide information on the patient experience and can be the target of therapeutic intervention. Patient-reported outcomes can improve the quality of patient care by creating a holistic approach to clinical decision-making; however, PROs are not routinely used as key outcome measures in major cardiovascular clinical trials. Thus, limited information is available on the impact of cardiovascular therapeutics on PROs to guide patient-level clinical decision-making or policy-level decision-making. Cardiovascular clinical research should shift its focus to include PROs when evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, and PRO assessments should be scientifically rigorous. The European Society of Cardiology and other professional societies can take action to influence the uptake of PRO data in the research and clinical communities. This process of integrating PRO data into comprehensive efficacy evaluations will ultimately improve the quality of care for patients across the spectrum of cardiovascular disease.
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  • Crous, P.W., et al. (författare)
  • Fungal Planet description sheets: 1112–1181
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Persoonia. - 0031-5850. ; 45, s. 251-409
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Novel species of fungi described in this study include those from various countries as follows: Australia, Austroboletus asper on soil, Cylindromonium alloxyli on leaves of Alloxylon pinnatum, Davidhawksworthia quintiniae on leaves of Quintinia sieberi, Exophiala prostantherae on leaves of Prostanthera sp., Lactifluus lactiglaucus on soil, Linteromyces quintiniae (incl. Linteromyces gen. nov.) on leaves of Quintinia sieberi, Lophotrichus medusoides from stem tissue of Citrus garrawayi, Mycena pulchra on soil, Neocalonectria tristaniopsidis (incl. Neocalonectria gen. nov.) and Xyladictyochaeta tristaniopsidis on leaves of Tristaniopsis collina, Parasarocladium tasmanniae on leaves of Tasmannia insipida, Phytophthora aquae-cooljarloo from pond water, Serendipita whamiae as endophyte from roots of Eriochilus cucullatus, Veloboletus limbatus (incl. Veloboletus gen. nov.) on soil. Austria, Cortinarius glaucoelotus on soil. Bulgaria, Suhomyces rilaensis from the gut of Bolitophagus interruptus found on a Polyporus sp. Canada, Cantharellus betularum among leaf litter of Betula, Penicillium saanichii from house dust. Chile, Circinella lampensis on soil, Exophiala embothrii from rhizosphere of Embothrium coccineum. China, Colletotrichum cycadis on leaves of Cycas revoluta. Croatia, Phialocephala melitaea on fallen branch of Pinus halepensis. Czech Republic, Geoglossum jirinae on soil, Pyrenochaetopsis rajhradensis from dead wood of Buxus sempervirens. Dominican Republic, Amanita domingensis on litter of deciduous wood, Melanoleuca dominicana on forest litter. France, Crin- ipellis nigrolamellata (Martinique) on leaves of Pisonia fragrans, Talaromyces pulveris from bore dust of Xestobium rufovillosum infesting floorboards. French Guiana, Hypoxylon hepaticolor on dead corticated branch. Great Britain, Inocybe ionolepis on soil. India, Cortinarius indopurpurascens among leaf litter of Quercus leucotrichophora. Iran, Pseudopyricularia javanii on infected leaves of Cyperus sp., Xenomonodictys iranica (incl. Xenomonodictys gen. nov.) on wood of Fagus orientalis. Italy, Penicillium vallebormidaense from compost. Namibia, Alternaria mira- bibensis on plant litter, Curvularia moringae and Moringomyces phantasmae (incl. Moringomyces gen. nov.) on leaves and flowers of Moringa ovalifolia, Gobabebomyces vachelliae (incl. Gobabebomyces gen. nov.) on leaves of Vachellia erioloba, Preussia procaviae on dung of Procavia capensis. Pakistan, Russula shawarensis from soil on forest floor. Russia, Cyberlindnera dauci from Daucus carota. South Africa, Acremonium behniae on leaves of Behnia reticulata, Dothiora aloidendri and Hantamomyces aloidendri (incl. Hantamomyces gen. nov.) on leaves of Aloidendron dichotomum, Endoconidioma euphorbiae on leaves of Euphorbia mauritanica, Eucasphaeria pro- teae on leaves of Protea neriifolia, Exophiala mali from inner fruit tissue of Malus sp., Graminopassalora geisso- rhizae on leaves of Geissorhiza splendidissima, Neocamarosporium leipoldtiae on leaves of Leipoldtia schultzii,Neocladosporium osteospermi on leaf spots of Osteospermum moniliferum, Neometulocladosporiella seifertii on leaves of Combretum caffrum, Paramyrothecium pituitipietianum on stems of Grielum humifusum, Phytopythium paucipapillatum from roots of Vitis sp., Stemphylium carpobroti and Verrucocladosporium carpobroti on leaves of Carpobrotus quadrifolius, Suttonomyces cephalophylli on leaves of Cephalophyllum pilansii. Sweden, Coprinopsis rubra on cow dung, Elaphomyces nemoreus from deciduous woodlands. Spain, Polyscytalum pini-canariensis on needles of Pinus canariensis, Pseudosubramaniomyces septatus from stream sediment, Tuber lusitanicum on soil under Quercus suber. Thailand, Tolypocladium flavonigrum on Elaphomyces sp. USA, Chaetothyrina spondiadis on fruits of Spondias mombin, Gymnascella minnisii from bat guano, Juncomyces patwiniorum on culms of Juncus effusus, Moelleriella puertoricoensis on scale insect, Neodothiora populina (incl. Neodothiora gen. nov.) on stem cankers of Populus tremuloides, Pseudogymnoascus palmeri from cave sediment. Vietnam, Cyphellophora viet- namensis on leaf litter, Tylopilus subotsuensis on soil in montane evergreen broadleaf forest. Morphological and culture characteristics are supported by DNA barcodes.
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8.
  • Friedlander, Michael, et al. (författare)
  • Clinical trials in recurrent ovarian cancer.
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. - : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. - 1048-891X .- 1525-1438. ; 21:4, s. 771-775
  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The 4th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup was held in Vancouver, Canada, in June 2010. Representatives of 23 cooperative research groups studying gynecologic cancers gathered to establish international consensus on issues critical to the conduct of large randomized trials. Group C, 1 of the 3 discussion groups, examined recurrent ovarian cancer, and we report the consensus reached regarding 4 questions. These included the following: (1) What is the role of cytoreductive surgery for recurrent ovarian cancer? (2) How do we define distinct patient populations in need of specific therapeutic approaches? (3) Should end points for trials with recurrent disease vary from those of first-line trials? (4) Is CA-125 progression alone sufficient for entry/eligibility into clinical trials?
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  • Pegelow, M., et al. (författare)
  • Reliability and Predictive Validity of Dental Arch Relationships Using the 5-Year-Olds’ Index and the GOSLON Yardstick to Determine Facial Growth
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. - 1055-6656. ; , s. 1055665620960971-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims: To determine reliability and predictive validity of the 5-year-olds’(5YO) Index and GOSLON Yardstick in 119 patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate at 5, 7/8, 10, 15/16, and 19 years. Methods: Five hundred thirty-four dental study models were appraised by 2 teams in 2 centers, twice in each center. Intrateam and interteam reliability in scoring the models was calculated using κ. Dental arch prediction rates were calculated as the proportion of models remaining in the same category (good–scores 1 and 2; fair–score 3; poor–scores 4 and 5) over time. Results: Intrateam and interteam κ statistics ranged from 0.74 to 0.89 and from 0.74 to 0.81, respectively. The 5YO Index and GOSLON Yardstick at 5 years produced almost identical results. The prediction rate of 19-year-old (n = 106) outcome was >80% for those in groups 1 and 2 at 5 years, while for those in groups 4 and 5 prediction was poor (<40%). Prediction of groups 4 and 5 remained poor until 10 years when it increased to 77%. At 15/16 years prediction rate was 93% for those in groups 4 and 5. Prediction of cases in group 3 was very poor at all ages. Conclusions: These results question the predictive value of “poor” dental arch relationships before 10 years of age. However, the predictive value of “good” dental arch relationship scores over time is good in all age groups. This has implications for audit policies to predict facial growth outcomes. © American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. All rights reserved 2020.
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