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Sökning: WFRF:(Cederlof M.)

  • Resultat 1-10 av 27
  • [1]23Nästa
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1.
  • Cederlöf, M., et al. (författare)
  • Intellectual disability and cognitive ability in Darier disease: Swedish nation-wide study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Dermatology. - 0007-0963. ; 173:1, s. 155-158
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Darier disease is an autosomal dominant skin disorder caused by mutations in the ATP2A2 gene. Anecdotal reports suggest a relationship between Darier disease and intellectual disabilities, but these reports are based on small clinical samples and limited by absence of control populations.Objectives: To examine the risk of intellectual disability and subclinical impairments in cognitive ability in Darier disease.Methods: We conducted a matched cohort study based on Swedish Population-, Patient- and Conscript Registers. The risk of being diagnosed with intellectual disability was estimated in 770 individuals with Darier disease, compared with matched comparison individuals without Darier disease. Associations were examined with risk ratios from conditional logistic regressions. In addition, we analysed test-based cognitive ability data (i.e. IQ data) from the Swedish conscript examination, for a subset of patients without diagnosed intellectual disability.Results: Individuals with Darier disease had a sixfold increased risk of being diagnosed with intellectual disability (risk ratio 6.2, 95% confidence interval 3.1-12.4). For conscripted individuals with Darier disease but no diagnosed intellectual disability, mean cognitive ability scores were about half a standard deviation lower than for comparison subjects.Conclusions: Darier disease is associated with intellectual disability and subclinical impairments in cognitive ability. The Darier-causing mutations merit further attention in molecular genetic research on intellectual disability and cognitive ability.
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2.
  • Reichenberg, Abraham, et al. (författare)
  • Discontinuity in the genetic and environmental causes of the intellectual disability spectrum
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. - Washington DC, USA : National Academy of Sciences. - 0027-8424. ; 113:4, s. 1098-1103
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Intellectual disability (ID) occurs in almost 3% of newborns. Despite substantial research, a fundamental question about its origin and links to intelligence (IQ) still remains. ID has been shown to be inherited and has been accepted as the extreme low of the normal IQ distribution. However, ID displays a complex pattern of inheritance. Previously, noninherited rare mutations were shown to contribute to severe ID risk in individual families, but in the majority of cases causes remain unknown. Common variants associated with ID risk in the population have not been systematically established. Here we evaluate the hypothesis, originally proposed almost 1 century ago, that most ID is caused by the same genetic and environmental influences responsible for the normal distribution of IQ, but that severe ID is not. We studied more than 1,000,000 sibling pairs and 9,000 twin pairs assessed for IQ and for the presence of ID. We evaluated whether genetic and environmental influences at the extremes of the distribution are different from those operating in the normal range. Here we show that factors influencing mild ID (lowest 3% of IQ distribution) were similar to those influencing IQ in the normal range. In contrast, the factors influencing severe ID (lowest 0.5% of IQ distribution) differ from those influencing mild ID or IQ scores in the normal range. Taken together, our results suggest that most severe ID is a distinct condition, qualitatively different from the preponderance of ID, which, in turn, represents the low extreme of the normal distribution of intelligence.
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3.
  • Cederlöf, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Etiological overlap between obsessive-compulsive disorder and anorexia nervosa : a longitudinal cohort, multigenerational family and twin study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: World Psychiatry. - Hoboken, USA : Wiley-Blackwell. - 1723-8617. ; 14:3, s. 333-338
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often co-occurs with anorexia nervosa (AN), a comorbid profile that complicates the clinical management of both conditions. This population-based study aimed to examine patterns of comorbidity, longitudinal risks, shared familial risks and shared genetic factors between OCD and AN at the population level. Participants were individuals with a diagnosis of OCD (N=19,814) or AN (N=8,462) in the Swedish National Patient Register between January 1992 and December 2009; their first-, second- and third-degree relatives; and population-matched (1:10 ratio) unaffected comparison individuals and their relatives. Female twins from the population-based Swedish Twin Register (N=8,550) were also included. Females with OCD had a 16-fold increased risk of having a comorbid diagnosis of AN, whereas males with OCD had a 37-fold increased risk. Longitudinal analyses showed that individuals first diagnosed with OCD had an increased risk for a later diagnosis of AN (risk ratio, RR=3.6), whereas individuals first diagnosed with AN had an even greater risk for a later diagnosis of OCD (RR=9.6). These longitudinal risks were about twice as high for males than for females. First- and second-degree relatives of probands with OCD had an increased risk for AN, and the magnitude of this risk tended to increase with the degree of genetic relatedness. Bivariate twin models revealed a moderate but significant degree of genetic overlap between self-reported OCD and AN diagnoses (ra =0.52, 95% CI: 0.26-0.81), but most of the genetic variance was disorder-specific. The moderately high genetic correlation supports the idea that this frequently observed comorbid pattern is at least in part due to shared genetic factors, though disorder-specific factors are more important. These results have implications for current gene-searching efforts and for clinical practice.
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4.
  • Cederlöf, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Klinefelter syndrome and risk of psychosis, autism and ADHD.
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Journal of psychiatric research. - 1879-1379. ; 48:1, s. 128-30
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorders and ADHD might be overrepresented in Klinefelter syndrome, but previous investigations have yielded inconclusive results.
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5.
  • Cederlöf, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Psychosis, and Bipolarity A Longitudinal Cohort and Multigenerational Family Study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Schizophrenia Bulletin. - Oxford, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press. - 0586-7614. ; 41:5, s. 1076-1083
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often co-occurs with psychotic and bipolar disorders; this comorbidity complicates the clinical management of these conditions. In this population-based longitudinal and multigenerational family study, we examined the patterns of comorbidity, longitudinal risks, and shared familial risks between these disorders. Participants were individuals with a diagnosis of OCD (n = 19,814), schizophrenia (n = 58,336), bipolar disorder (n = 48,180), and schizoaffective disorder (n = 14,904) included in the Swedish Patient Register between January 1969 and December 2009; their first-, second-, and third-degree relatives; and population-matched (1:10 ratio) unaffected comparison individuals and their relatives. The Swedish Prescribed Drug Register was used to control for the potential effect of medication in the longitudinal analyses. Individuals with OCD had a 12-fold increased risk of having a comorbid diagnosis of schizophrenia and a 13-fold increased risk of bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder. Longitudinal analyses showed that individuals first diagnosed with OCD had an increased risk for later diagnosis of all other disorders, and vice versa. The risk of bipolar disorder was reduced, but not eliminated, when the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was adjusted for. OCD-unaffected first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of probands with OCD had a significantly increased risk for all 3 disorders; the magnitude of this risk decreased as the genetic distance increased. We conclude that OCD is etiologically related to both schizophrenia spectrum and bipolar disorders. The results have implications for current gene-searching efforts and for clinical practice.
6.
  • Cederlöf, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • The association between Darier disease, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia revisited: a population-based family study.
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Bipolar disorders. - 1399-5618. ; 17:3, s. 340-4
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Darier disease is an autosomal dominant skin disorder caused by mutations in the ATPase, Ca++ transporting, cardiac muscle, slow twitch 2 (ATP2A2) gene and previously reported to cosegregate with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in occasional pedigrees. It is, however, unknown whether these associations exist also in the general population, and the objective of this study was to examine this question.
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7.
  • Lichtenstein, P., et al. (författare)
  • Associations between conduct problems in childhood and adverse outcomes in emerging adulthood: a longitudinal Swedish nationwide twin cohort
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines. - 0021-9630 .- 1469-7610.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background We examined whether childhood conduct problems predicted a wide range of adverse outcomes in emerging adulthood and whether the association with internalizing problems remained after adjusting for general comorbidity and externalizing problems. Methods Participants were 18,649 twins from the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden. At age 9/12, parents rated their children on eight conduct problems. Adverse outcomes were retrieved from national registers in emerging adulthood (median follow‐up time = 9.2 years), including diagnoses of six psychiatric disorders, prescriptions of antidepressants, suicide attempts, criminality, high school ineligibility, and social welfare recipiency. We estimated risk for the separate outcomes and examined if conduct problems predicted an internalizing factor above and beyond a general comorbidity and an externalizing factor. We used twin analyses to estimate genetic and environmental contributions to these associations. Results On the average, each additional conduct symptom in childhood was associated with a 32% increased risk of the adverse outcomes in emerging adulthood (mean hazard ratio = 1.32; range = 1.16, 1.56). A latent childhood conduct problems factor predicted the internalizing factor in emerging adulthood (βboys = .24, standard error, SE = 0.03; βgirls = .17, SE = 0.03), above and beyond its association with the externalizing (βboys = 0.21, SE = 0.04; βgirls = 0.17, SE = 0.05) and general factors (βboys = 0.45, SE = 0.03; βgirls = 0.34, SE = 0.04). These associations were differentially influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Conclusions It is important to monitor boys and girls with conduct problems not only for future externalizing problems, but also for future internalizing problems. Prevention of specific outcomes, however, might require interventions at different levels.
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8.
  • Cederlöf, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Acute intermittent porphyria : comorbidity and shared familial risks with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in Sweden
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Psychiatry. - London, United Kingdom : Royal College of Psychiatrists. - 0007-1250. ; 207:6, s. 556-557
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) has been associated with schizophrenia in some studies, but prior research is limited by the absence of comparison populations. Here, we linked Swedish registers to examine the risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in 717 individuals diagnosed with AIP and their first-degree relatives, compared with matched individuals without AIP and their first-degree relatives. Individuals with AIP had a fourfold increased risk of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Similarly, relatives of individuals with AIP had double the risk of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, suggesting that these associations may be as a result of common genetic influences.
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9.
  • Cederlöf, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Reading problems and major mental disorders : co-occurrences and familial overlaps in a Swedish nationwide cohort
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Journal of Psychiatric Research. - Elsevier. - 0022-3956. ; 91, s. 124-129
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Reading problems often co-occur with ADHD and conduct disorder. However, the patterns of co-occurrence and familial overlap between reading problems and other psychiatric disorders have not been systematically explored. We conducted a register-based cohort study including 8719 individuals with reading problems and their siblings, along with matched comparison individuals. Conditional logistic regressions estimated risks for ADHD, autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anorexia nervosa, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, substance use disorder, and violent/non-violent criminality in individuals with reading problems and their siblings. Diagnoses of psychiatric disorders were physician-assigned and ascertained from the Swedish National Patient Register, and crime convictions from the Swedish National Crime Register. We found that individuals with reading problems had excess risks for all psychiatric disorders (except anorexia nervosa) and criminality, with risk ratios between 1.34 and 4.91. Siblings of individuals with reading problems showed excess risks for ADHD, autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, substance use disorder, and non-violent criminality, with risk ratios between 1.14 and 1.70. In summary, individuals with reading problems had increased risks of virtually all psychiatric disorders, and criminality. The origin of most of these overlaps was familial, in that siblings of individuals with reading problems also had elevated risks of ADHD, autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, substance use disorder, and non-violent criminality. These findings have implications for gene-searching efforts, and suggest that health care practitioners should be alert for signs of psychiatric disorders in families where reading problems exist.
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10.
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