SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Doyle Karen M) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Doyle Karen M)

  • Resultat 1-9 av 9
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  •  
2.
  •  
3.
  •  
4.
  • Murray, Christopher J. L., et al. (författare)
  • Population and fertility by age and sex for 195 countries and territories, 1950–2017: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - 1474-547X .- 0140-6736. ; 392:10159, s. 1995-2051
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Population estimates underpin demographic and epidemiological research and are used to track progress on numerous international indicators of health and development. To date, internationally available estimates of population and fertility, although useful, have not been produced with transparent and replicable methods and do not use standardised estimates of mortality. We present single-calendar year and single-year of age estimates of fertility and population by sex with standardised and replicable methods. Methods: We estimated population in 195 locations by single year of age and single calendar year from 1950 to 2017 with standardised and replicable methods. We based the estimates on the demographic balancing equation, with inputs of fertility, mortality, population, and migration data. Fertility data came from 7817 location-years of vital registration data, 429 surveys reporting complete birth histories, and 977 surveys and censuses reporting summary birth histories. We estimated age-specific fertility rates (ASFRs; the annual number of livebirths to women of a specified age group per 1000 women in that age group) by use of spatiotemporal Gaussian process regression and used the ASFRs to estimate total fertility rates (TFRs; the average number of children a woman would bear if she survived through the end of the reproductive age span [age 10–54 years] and experienced at each age a particular set of ASFRs observed in the year of interest). Because of sparse data, fertility at ages 10–14 years and 50–54 years was estimated from data on fertility in women aged 15–19 years and 45–49 years, through use of linear regression. Age-specific mortality data came from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2017 estimates. Data on population came from 1257 censuses and 761 population registry location-years and were adjusted for underenumeration and age misreporting with standard demographic methods. Migration was estimated with the GBD Bayesian demographic balancing model, after incorporating information about refugee migration into the model prior. Final population estimates used the cohort-component method of population projection, with inputs of fertility, mortality, and migration data. Population uncertainty was estimated by use of out-of-sample predictive validity testing. With these data, we estimated the trends in population by age and sex and in fertility by age between 1950 and 2017 in 195 countries and territories. Findings: From 1950 to 2017, TFRs decreased by 49·4% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 46·4–52·0). The TFR decreased from 4·7 livebirths (4·5–4·9) to 2·4 livebirths (2·2–2·5), and the ASFR of mothers aged 10–19 years decreased from 37 livebirths (34–40) to 22 livebirths (19–24) per 1000 women. Despite reductions in the TFR, the global population has been increasing by an average of 83·8 million people per year since 1985. The global population increased by 197·2% (193·3–200·8) since 1950, from 2·6 billion (2·5–2·6) to 7·6 billion (7·4–7·9) people in 2017; much of this increase was in the proportion of the global population in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. The global annual rate of population growth increased between 1950 and 1964, when it peaked at 2·0%; this rate then remained nearly constant until 1970 and then decreased to 1·1% in 2017. Population growth rates in the southeast Asia, east Asia, and Oceania GBD super-region decreased from 2·5% in 1963 to 0·7% in 2017, whereas in sub-Saharan Africa, population growth rates were almost at the highest reported levels ever in 2017, when they were at 2·7%. The global average age increased from 26·6 years in 1950 to 32·1 years in 2017, and the proportion of the population that is of working age (age 15–64 years) increased from 59·9% to 65·3%. At the national level, the TFR decreased in all countries and territories between 1950 and 2017; in 2017, TFRs ranged from a low of 1·0 livebirths (95% UI 0·9–1·2) in Cyprus to a high of 7·1 livebirths (6·8–7·4) in Niger. The TFR under age 25 years (TFU25; number of livebirths expected by age 25 years for a hypothetical woman who survived the age group and was exposed to current ASFRs) in 2017 ranged from 0·08 livebirths (0·07–0·09) in South Korea to 2·4 livebirths (2·2–2·6) in Niger, and the TFR over age 30 years (TFO30; number of livebirths expected for a hypothetical woman ageing from 30 to 54 years who survived the age group and was exposed to current ASFRs) ranged from a low of 0·3 livebirths (0·3–0·4) in Puerto Rico to a high of 3·1 livebirths (3·0–3·2) in Niger. TFO30 was higher than TFU25 in 145 countries and territories in 2017. 33 countries had a negative population growth rate from 2010 to 2017, most of which were located in central, eastern, and western Europe, whereas population growth rates of more than 2·0% were seen in 33 of 46 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2017, less than 65% of the national population was of working age in 12 of 34 high-income countries, and less than 50% of the national population was of working age in Mali, Chad, and Niger. Interpretation: Population trends create demographic dividends and headwinds (ie, economic benefits and detriments) that affect national economies and determine national planning needs. Although TFRs are decreasing, the global population continues to grow as mortality declines, with diverse patterns at the national level and across age groups. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide transparent and replicable estimates of population and fertility, which can be used to inform decision making and to monitor progress. Funding: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
  •  
5.
  •  
6.
  • Jung, Christian, et al. (författare)
  • A comparison of very old patients admitted to intensive care unit after acute versus elective surgery or intervention
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Journal of critical care. - : W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC. - 0883-9441 .- 1557-8615. ; 52, s. 141-148
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: We aimed to evaluate differences in outcome between patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) after elective versus acute surgery in a multinational cohort of very old patients (80 years; VIP). Predictors of mortality, with special emphasis on frailty, were assessed.Methods: In total, 5063 VIPs were induded in this analysis, 922 were admitted after elective surgery or intervention, 4141 acutely, with 402 after acute surgery. Differences were calculated using Mann-Whitney-U test and Wilcoxon test. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess associations with mortality.Results: Compared patients admitted after acute surgery, patients admitted after elective surgery suffered less often from frailty as defined as CFS (28% vs 46%; p < 0.001), evidenced lower SOFA scores (4 +/- 5 vs 7 +/- 7; p < 0.001). Presence of frailty (CFS >4) was associated with significantly increased mortality both in elective surgery patients (7% vs 12%; p = 0.01), in acute surgery (7% vs 12%; p = 0.02).Conclusions: VIPs admitted to ICU after elective surgery evidenced favorable outcome over patients after acute surgery even after correction for relevant confounders. Frailty might be used to guide clinicians in risk stratification in both patients admitted after elective and acute surgery. 
  •  
7.
  • Fitzgerald, Seán, et al. (författare)
  • Large Artery Atherosclerotic Clots are Larger than Clots of other Stroke Etiologies and have Poorer Recanalization rates.
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association. - 1532-8511. ; 30:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • There is a paucity of knowledge in the literature relating to the extent of clot burden and stroke etiology. In this study, we measured the Extracted Clot Area (ECA) retrieved during endovascular treatment (EVT) and investigated relationships with suspected etiology, administration of intravenous thrombolysis and recanalization.As part of the multi-institutional RESTORE registry, the ECA retrieved during mechanical thrombectomy was quantified using ImageJ. The effect of stroke etiology (Large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA), Cardioembolism, Cryptogenic and other) and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) on ECA and recanalization outcome (mTICI) was assessed. Successful recanalization was described as mTICI 2c-3.A total of 550 patients who underwent EVT with any clot retrieved were included in the study. The ECA was significantly larger in the LAA group compared to all other etiologies. The average ECA size of each etiology was; LAA=109 mm2, Cardioembolic=52 mm2, Cryptogenic=47 mm2 and Other=52 mm2 (p=0.014*). LAA patients also had a significantly poorer rate of successful recanalization (mTICI 2c-3) compared to all other etiologies (p=0.003*). The administration of tPA was associated with a smaller ECA in both LAA (p=0.007*) and cardioembolic (p=0.035*) groups.The ECA of LAA clots was double the size of all other etiologies and this is associated with a lower rate of successful recanalization in LAA stroke subtype. rtPA administration prior to thrombectomy was associated with reduced ECA in LAA and CE clots.
  •  
8.
  • Fitzgerald, Seán, et al. (författare)
  • Per-pass analysis of acute ischemic stroke clots: impact of stroke etiology on extracted clot area and histological composition.
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Journal of neurointerventional surgery. - 1759-8486.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Initial studies investigating correlations between stroke etiology and clot composition are conflicting and do not account for clot size as determined by area. Radiological studies have shown that cardioembolic strokes are associated with shorter clot lengths and lower clot burden than non-cardioembolic clots.To report the relationship between stroke etiology, extracted clot area, and histological composition at each procedural pass.As part of the multi-institutional RESTORE Registry, the Martius Scarlett Blue stained histological composition and extracted clot area of 612 per-pass clots retrieved from 441 patients during mechanical thrombectomy procedures were quantified. Correlations with clinical and procedural details were investigated.Clot composition varied significantly with procedural passes; clots retrieved in earlier passes had higher red blood cell content (H4=11.644, p=0.020) and larger extracted clot area (H4=10.730, p=0.030). Later passes were associated with significantly higher fibrin (H4=12.935, p=0.012) and platelets/other (H4=15.977, p=0.003) content and smaller extracted clot area. Large artery atherosclerotic (LAA) clots were significantly larger in the extracted clot area and more red blood cell-rich than other etiologies in passes 1-3. Cardioembolic and cryptogenic clots had similar histological composition and extracted clot area across all procedural passes.LAA clots are larger and associated with a large red blood cell-rich extracted clot area, suggesting soft thrombus material. Cardioembolic clots are smaller in the extracted clot area, consistent in composition and area across passes, and have higher fibrin and platelets/other content than LAA clots, making them stiffer clots. The per-pass histological composition and extracted clot area of cryptogenic clots are similar to those of cardioembolic clots, suggesting similar formation mechanisms.
  •  
9.
  • Rossi, Rosanna, et al. (författare)
  • Does prior administration of rtPA influence acute ischemic stroke clot composition? Findings from the analysis of clots retrieved with mechanical thrombectomy from the RESTORE registry.
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Journal of neurology. - 1432-1459.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • There is still much debate whether bridging-therapy [intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) prior to mechanical thrombectomy (MT)] might be beneficial compared to MT alone. We investigated the effect of IVT on size and histological composition of the clots retrieved from patients undergoing bridging-therapy or MT alone.We collected mechanically extracted thrombi from 1000 acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients included in RESTORE registry. Patients were grouped according to the administration (or not) of IVT before thrombectomy. Gross photos of each clot were taken and Extracted Clot Area (ECA) was measured using ImageJ software. Martius Scarlett Blue stain was used to characterize the main histological clot components [red blood cells (RBCs), fibrin (FIB), platelets/other (PTL)] and Orbit Image Analysis was used for quantification. Additionally, we calculated the area of each main component by multiplying the component percent by ECA. Chi-squared and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for statistical analysis.451 patients (45%) were treated with bridging-therapy while 549 (55%) underwent MT alone. When considering only percent histological composition, we did not find any difference in RBC% (P = 0.895), FIB% (P = 0.458) and PTL% (P = 0.905). However, bridging-therapy clots were significantly smaller than MT-alone clots [32.7 (14.8-64.9) versus 36.8 (20.1-79.8) mm2, N = 1000, H1 = 7.679, P = 0.006*]. A further analysis expressing components per clot area showed that clots retrieved from bridging-therapy cases contained less RBCs [13.25 (4.29-32.06) versus 14.97 (4.93-39.80) mm2, H1 = 3.637, P = 0.056] and significantly less fibrin [9.10 (4.62-17.98) versus 10.54 (5.57-22.48) mm2, H1 = 7.920, P = 0.005*] and platelets/other [5.04 (2.26-11.32) versus 6.54 (2.94-13.79) mm2, H1 = 9.380, P = 0.002*] than MT-alone clots.Our results suggest that previous IVT administration significantly reduces thrombus size, proportionally releasing all the main histological components.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-9 av 9

Kungliga biblioteket hanterar dina personuppgifter i enlighet med EU:s dataskyddsförordning (2018), GDPR. Läs mer om hur det funkar här.
Så här hanterar KB dina uppgifter vid användning av denna tjänst.

 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy