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Sökning: WFRF:(Fazekas F)

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  • Jokinen, H., et al. (författare)
  • Global Burden of Small Vessel Disease-Related Brain Changes on MRI Predicts Cognitive and Functional Decline
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Stroke. - 0039-2499 .- 1524-4628. ; 51:1, s. 170-178
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background and Purpose- Cerebral small vessel disease is characterized by a wide range of focal and global brain changes. We used a magnetic resonance imaging segmentation tool to quantify multiple types of small vessel disease-related brain changes and examined their individual and combined predictive value on cognitive and functional abilities. Methods- Magnetic resonance imaging scans of 560 older individuals from LADIS (Leukoaraiosis and Disability Study) were analyzed using automated atlas- and convolutional neural network-based segmentation methods yielding volumetric measures of white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, enlarged perivascular spaces, chronic cortical infarcts, and global and regional brain atrophy. The subjects were followed up with annual neuropsychological examinations for 3 years and evaluation of instrumental activities of daily living for 7 years. Results- The strongest predictors of cognitive performance and functional outcome over time were the total volumes of white matter hyperintensities, gray matter, and hippocampi (P<0.001 for global cognitive function, processing speed, executive functions, and memory and P<0.001 for poor functional outcome). Volumes of lacunes, enlarged perivascular spaces, and cortical infarcts were significantly associated with part of the outcome measures, but their contribution was weaker. In a multivariable linear mixed model, volumes of white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, gray matter, and hippocampi remained as independent predictors of cognitive impairment. A combined measure of these markers based on Z scores strongly predicted cognitive and functional outcomes (P<0.001) even above the contribution of the individual brain changes. Conclusions- Global burden of small vessel disease-related brain changes as quantified by an image segmentation tool is a powerful predictor of long-term cognitive decline and functional disability. A combined measure of white matter hyperintensities, lacunar, gray matter, and hippocampal volumes could be used as an imaging marker associated with vascular cognitive impairment.
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  • Khalil, M., et al. (författare)
  • Neurofilaments as biomarkers in neurological disorders
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Nature Reviews Neurology. - 1759-4758 .- 1759-4766. ; 14:10, s. 577-589
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Neuroaxonal damage is the pathological substrate of permanent disability in various neurological disorders. Reliable quantification and longitudinal follow-up of such damage are important for assessing disease activity, monitoring treatment responses, facilitating treatment development and determining prognosis. The neurofilament proteins have promise in this context because their levels rise upon neuroaxonal damage not only in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but also in blood, and they indicate neuroaxonal injury independent of causal pathways. First-generation (immunoblot) and second-generation (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) neurofilament assays had limited sensitivity. Third-generation (electrochemiluminescence) and particularly fourth-generation (single-molecule array) assays enable the reliable measurement of neurofilaments throughout the range of concentrations found in blood samples. This technological advancement has paved the way to investigate neurofilaments in a range of neurological disorders. Here, we review what is known about the structure and function of neurofilaments, discuss analytical aspects and knowledge of age-dependent normal ranges of neurofilaments and provide a comprehensive overview of studies on neurofilament light chain as a marker of axonal injury in different neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative dementia, stroke, traumatic brain injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson disease. We also consider work needed to explore the value of this axonal damage marker in managing neurological diseases in daily practice.
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  • Wahlgren, N., et al. (författare)
  • Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Stroke. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 1747-4930 .- 1747-4949. ; 11:1, s. 134-147
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16-18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then been approved by each society. The recommendations are identical to the original version with evidence level upgraded by 20 February 2015 and confirmed by 15 May 2015. The purpose of the ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update meetings is to provide updates on recent stroke therapy research and to discuss how the results may be implemented into clinical routine. Selected topics are discussed at consensus sessions, for which a consensus statement is prepared and discussed by the participants at the meeting. The statements are advisory to the ESO guidelines committee. This consensus statement includes recommendations on mechanical thrombectomy after acute stroke. The statement is supported by ESO, European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), and European Academy of Neurology (EAN).
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  • Frederiksen, K. S., et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity in the elderly is associated with improved executive function and processing speed: the LADIS Study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. - 0885-6230 .- 1099-1166. ; 30:7, s. 744-750
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • ObjectivesPhysical activity reduces the risk of cognitive decline but may affect cognitive domains differently. We examined whether physical activity modifies processing speed, executive function and memory in a population of non-dementia elderly subjects with age-related white matter changes (ARWMC). MethodsData from the Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) study, a multicenter, European prospective cohort study aimed at examining the role of ARWMC in transition to disability, was used. Subjects in the LADIS study were clinically assessed yearly for 3years including MRI at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Physical activity was assessed at baseline, and cognitive compound scores at baseline and 3-year assessment were used. ResultsTwo-hundred-eighty-two subjects (age, y (mean (SD)): 73.1 (5.1); gender (f/m): 164/118); MMSE (mean (SD)): 28.3 (+/- 1.7)) who had not progressed to MCI or dementia, were included. Multiple variable linear regression analysis with baseline MMSE, education, gender, age, stroke, diabetes and ARWMC rating as covariates revealed that physical activity was associated with better scores at baseline and 3-year follow-up for executive function (baseline: : 0.39, 95% CI: 0.13-0.90, p=0.008; follow-up: : 0.24, 95% CI: 0.10-0.38, p=0.001) and processing speed (baseline: : 0.48, 95% CI: 0.14-0.89, p=0.005; follow-up: : 0.15, 95% CI: 0.02-0.29, p=0.02) but not memory. When including baseline cognitive score as a covariate in the analysis of 3-year follow-up scores, executive function remained significant (: 0.11, 95% CI: 0-0.22, p=0.04). ConclusionOur findings confirm previous findings of a positive effect of physical activity on cognitive functions in elderly subjects, and further extends these by showing that the association is also present in patients with ARWMC. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • Gouw, Alida A, et al. (författare)
  • On the etiology of incident brain lacunes: longitudinal observations from the LADIS study.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation. - 1524-4628. ; 39:11, s. 3083-5
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated regional differences in MRI characteristics and risk factor profiles of incident lacunes over a 3-year period. METHODS: Baseline and 3-year follow-up MRI were collected within the LADIS study (n=358). Incident lacunes were characterized with respect to brain region, their appearance within pre-existent white matter hyperintensities (WMH), surrounding WMH size, and risk factors. RESULTS: 106 incident lacunes were observed in 62 patients (58 subcortical white matter [WM], 35 basal ganglia, and 13 infratentorial). Incident subcortical WM lacunes occurred more often within preexisting WMH (P=0.01) and were mostly accompanied by new and expanded WMH (P<0.001), compared to incident basal ganglia and infratentorial lacunes. Risk factors for incident subcortical WM lacunes were history of hypertension and stroke, whereas atrial fibrillation predicted incident basal ganglia/infratentorial lacunes. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in relation to WMH and risk factor profiles may suggest that incident lacunes in the subcortical WM have a different pathogenesis than those in the basal ganglia and infratentorial region.
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  • Gouw, Alida A, et al. (författare)
  • Progression of white matter hyperintensities and incidence of new lacunes over a 3-year period: the Leukoaraiosis and Disability study.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation. - 1524-4628. ; 39:5, s. 1414-20
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We studied the natural course of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and lacunes, the main MRI representatives of small vessel disease, over time and evaluated possible predictors for their development. METHODS: Baseline and repeat MRI (3-year follow-up) were collected within the multicenter, multinational Leukoaraiosis and Disability study (n=396). Baseline WMH were scored on MRI by the Fazekas scale and the Scheltens scale. WMH progression was assessed using the modified Rotterdam Progression scale (absence/presence of progression in 9 brain regions). Baseline and new lacunes were counted per region. WMH and lacunes at baseline and vascular risk factors were evaluated as predictors of WMH progression and new lacunes. RESULTS: WMH progressed (mean+/-SD=1.9+/-1.8) mostly in the subcortical white matter, where WMH was also most prevalent at baseline. The majority of new lacunes, which were found in 19% of the subjects (maximum=9), also appeared in the subcortical white matter, mainly of the frontal lobes, whereas most baseline lacunes were located in the basal ganglia. Baseline WMH and lacunes predicted both WMH progression and new lacunes. Furthermore, previous stroke, diabetes, and blood glucose were risk factors for WMH progression. Male sex, hypertension, systolic blood pressure, previous stroke, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride levels were risk factors for new lacunes. CONCLUSIONS: WMH and lacunes progressed over time, predominantly in the subcortical white matter. Progression was observed especially in subjects with considerable WMH and lacunes at baseline. Moreover, the presence of vascular risk factors at baseline predicted WMH progression and new lacunes over a 3-year period.
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  • Resultat 1-10 av 83
  • [1]234567...9Nästa
 
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