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Sökning: WFRF:(Hasdai D)

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  • Dotevall, Annika, 1957, et al. (författare)
  • Diabetes mellitus: clinical presentation and outcome in men and women with acute coronary syndromes. Data from the Euro Heart Survey ACS
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: Diabet Med. - 0742-3071 .- 1464-5491. ; 22:11, s. 1542-50
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • AIMS: To study clinical presentation, in-hospital course and short-term prognosis in men and women with diabetes mellitus and acute coronary syndromes (ACS). METHODS: Men (n = 6488, 21.2% with diabetes) and 2809 women (28.7% with diabetes) < or = 80 years old, with a discharge diagnosis of ACS were prospectively enrolled in the Euro Heart Survey of ACS. RESULTS: Women with diabetes were more likely to present with ST elevation than non-diabetic women, a difference that became more marked after adjustment for differences in smoking, hypertension, obesity, medication and prior disease [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.46 (1.20, 1.78)], whereas there was little difference between diabetic and non-diabetic men [adjusted OR 0.99 (0.86, 1.14)]. In addition, women with diabetes were more likely to develop Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI) than non-diabetic women [adjusted OR 1.61 (1.30, 1.99)], while there was no difference between men with and without diabetes [adjusted OR 0.99 (0.85, 1.15)]. There were significant interactions between sex, diabetes and presenting with ST-elevation ACS (P < 0.001), and Q-wave MI (P < 0.001), respectively. Of the women with diabetes, 7.4% died in hospital, compared with 3.6% of non-diabetic women [adjusted OR 2.13 (1.39, 3.26)], whereas corresponding mortality rates in men with and without diabetes were 4.1% and 3.3%, respectively [OR 1.13 (0.76, 1.67)] (P for diabetes-sex interaction 0.021). CONCLUSION: In women with ACS, diabetes is associated with higher risk of presenting with ST-elevation ACS, developing Q-wave MI, and of in-hospital mortality, whereas in men with ACS diabetes is not significantly associated with increased risk of either. These findings suggest a differential effect of diabetes on the pathophysiology of ACS based on the patient's sex.
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  • Rosengren, Annika, 1951, et al. (författare)
  • Cardiovascular risk factors and clinical presentation in acute coronary syndromes
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: Heart. - 1468-201X .- 1355-6037. ; 91:9, s. 1141-7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hypothesis that risk factors may be differently related to severity of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), with ST elevation used as a marker of severe ACS. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of patients with ACS. SETTING: 103 hospitals in 25 countries in Europe and the Mediterranean basin. PATIENTS: 10,253 patients with a discharge diagnosis of ACS in the Euro heart survey of ACS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presenting with ST elevation ACS. RESULTS: Patients with ACS who were smokers had an increased risk to present with ST elevation (age adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.67 to 2.02). Hypertension (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.70) and high body mass index (BMI) (p for trend 0.0005) were associated with less ST elevation ACS. Diabetes mellitus was also associated with less ST elevation, but only among men. Prior disease (infarction, chronic angina, revascularisation) and treatment with aspirin, beta blockers, or statins before admission were also associated with less ST elevation. After adjustment for age, sex, prior disease, and prior medication, smoking was still significantly associated with increased risk of ST elevation (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.69), whereas hypertension was associated with reduced risk (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.82). Obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2 versus < 25 kg/m2) was independently associated with less risk of presenting with ST elevation among women, but not among men. CONCLUSION: Among patients with ACS, presenting with ST elevation is strongly associated with smoking, whereas hypertension and high BMI (in women) are associated with less ST elevation, independently of prior disease and medication.
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  • Rosengren, Annika, 1951, et al. (författare)
  • Age, clinical presentation, and outcome of acute coronary syndromes in the Euroheart acute coronary syndrome survey
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: Eur Heart J. - 0195-668X .- 1522-9645. ; 27:7, s. 789-95
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • AIMS: Age is one of the most powerful determinants of prognosis in myocardial infarction, but there is comparatively little recent data across the whole spectrum of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We examined the impact of increasing age on clinical presentation and hospital outcome in a large sample of patients with ACS. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients (n = 10 253) from the Euroheart ACS survey in 103 hospitals in 25 countries were investigated. There was a significant inverse association between the age and the likelihood of presenting with ST-elevation. For each decade of life, the odds of presenting with ST-elevation decreased by 0.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.84]; P < 0.0001. Elderly patients were considerably less often treated by cardiologists, less extensively investigated, and, when presenting with ST-elevation ACS, less likely to be treated with reperfusion. Compared with patients <55 years, the odds ratios of hospital mortality were 1.87 (1.21-2.88) at age 55-64, 3.70 (2.51-5.44) at age 65-74, 6.23 (4.25-9.14) at age 75-84, and 14.5 (9.47-22.1) among patients > or =85 years, with no major differences across different types of admission or discharge diagnoses. CONCLUSION: Elderly ACS patients were less likely to present with ST-elevation but had substantial in-hospital mortality, yet they were markedly less intensively treated and investigated.
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  • Resultat 1-10 av 13
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