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  • Sampson, Joshua N., et al. (författare)
  • Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for 13 Cancer Types
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - 0027-8874 .- 1460-2105. ; 107:12
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. Methods: Between 2007 and 2014, the US National Cancer Institute has generated data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 49 492 cancer case patients and 34 131 control patients. We apply novel mixed model methodology (GCTA) to this GWAS data to estimate the heritability of individual cancers, as well as the proportion of heritability attributable to cigarette smoking in smoking-related cancers, and the genetic correlation between pairs of cancers. Results: GWAS heritability was statistically significant at nearly all sites, with the estimates of array-based heritability, h(l)(2), on the liability threshold (LT) scale ranging from 0.05 to 0.38. Estimating the combined heritability of multiple smoking characteristics, we calculate that at least 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 37%) and 7% (95% CI = 4% to 11%) of the heritability for lung and bladder cancer, respectively, can be attributed to genetic determinants of smoking. Most pairs of cancers studied did not show evidence of strong genetic correlation. We found only four pairs of cancers with marginally statistically significant correlations, specifically kidney and testes (rho = 0.73, SE = 0.28), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and pediatric osteosarcoma (rho = 0.53, SE = 0.21), DLBCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (rho = 0.51, SE = 0.18), and bladder and lung (rho = 0.35, SE = 0.14). Correlation analysis also indicates that the genetic architecture of lung cancer differs between a smoking population of European ancestry and a nonsmoking Asian population, allowing for the possibility that the genetic etiology for the same disease can vary by population and environmental exposures. Conclusion: Our results provide important insights into the genetic architecture of cancers and suggest new avenues for investigation.</p>
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3.
  • Sampson, Joshua N., et al. (författare)
  • Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for 13 Cancer Types
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - 0027-8874 .- 1460-2105. ; 107:12
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites.</p><p>Methods: Between 2007 and 2014, the US National Cancer Institute has generated data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 49 492 cancer case patients and 34 131 control patients. We apply novel mixed model methodology (GCTA) to this GWAS data to estimate the heritability of individual cancers, as well as the proportion of heritability attributable to cigarette smoking in smoking-related cancers, and the genetic correlation between pairs of cancers.</p><p>Results: GWAS heritability was statistically significant at nearly all sites, with the estimates of array-based heritability, h(l)(2), on the liability threshold (LT) scale ranging from 0.05 to 0.38. Estimating the combined heritability of multiple smoking characteristics, we calculate that at least 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 37%) and 7% (95% CI = 4% to 11%) of the heritability for lung and bladder cancer, respectively, can be attributed to genetic determinants of smoking. Most pairs of cancers studied did not show evidence of strong genetic correlation. We found only four pairs of cancers with marginally statistically significant correlations, specifically kidney and testes (rho = 0.73, SE = 0.28), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and pediatric osteosarcoma (rho = 0.53, SE = 0.21), DLBCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (rho = 0.51, SE = 0.18), and bladder and lung (rho = 0.35, SE = 0.14). Correlation analysis also indicates that the genetic architecture of lung cancer differs between a smoking population of European ancestry and a nonsmoking Asian population, allowing for the possibility that the genetic etiology for the same disease can vary by population and environmental exposures.</p><p>Conclusion: Our results provide important insights into the genetic architecture of cancers and suggest new avenues for investigation.</p>
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4.
  • Skibola, Christine F, et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Five Susceptibility Loci for Follicular Lymphoma outside the HLA Region.
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Human Genetics. - Cell Press. - 0002-9297. ; 95:4, s. 462-471
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of follicular lymphoma (FL) have previously identified human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene variants. To identify additional FL susceptibility loci, we conducted a large-scale two-stage GWAS in 4,523 case subjects and 13,344 control subjects of European ancestry. Five non-HLA loci were associated with FL risk: 11q23.3 (rs4938573, p = 5.79 × 10(-20)) near CXCR5; 11q24.3 (rs4937362, p = 6.76 × 10(-11)) near ETS1; 3q28 (rs6444305, p = 1.10 × 10(-10)) in LPP; 18q21.33 (rs17749561, p = 8.28 × 10(-10)) near BCL2; and 8q24.21 (rs13254990, p = 1.06 × 10(-8)) near PVT1. In an analysis of the HLA region, we identified four linked HLA-DRβ1 multiallelic amino acids at positions 11, 13, 28, and 30 that were associated with FL risk (pomnibus = 4.20 × 10(-67) to 2.67 × 10(-70)). Additional independent signals included rs17203612 in HLA class II (odds ratio [ORper-allele] = 1.44; p = 4.59 × 10(-16)) and rs3130437 in HLA class I (ORper-allele = 1.23; p = 8.23 × 10(-9)). Our findings further expand the number of loci associated with FL and provide evidence that multiple common variants outside the HLA region make a significant contribution to FL risk.
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  • Cozen, W., et al. (författare)
  • A meta-analysis of Hodgkin lymphoma reveals 19p13.3 TCF3 as a novel susceptibility locus
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Nature Communications. - 2041-1723 .- 2041-1723. ; 5, s. 3856
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have identified associations with genetic variation at both HLA and non-HLA loci; however, much of heritable HL susceptibility remains unexplained. Here we perform a meta-analysis of three HL GWAS totaling 1,816 cases and 7,877 controls followed by replication in an independent set of 1,281 cases and 3,218 controls to find novel risk loci. We identify a novel variant at 19p13.3 associated with HL (rs1860661; odds ratio (OR) = 0.81, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.76-0.86, P-combined 3.5 x 10(-10)), located in intron 2 of TCF3 (also known as E2A), a regulator of B-and T-cell lineage commitment known to be involved in HL pathogenesis. This meta-analysis also notes associations between previously published loci at 2p16, 5q31, 6p31, 8q24 and 10p14 and HL subtypes. We conclude that our data suggest a link between the 19p13.3 locus, including TCF3, and HL risk.</p>
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  • Chang, E T, et al. (författare)
  • Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - Oxford University Press. - 1460-2105. ; 97:3, s. 210-218
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background. The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prevalence of obesity are increasing globally. A suggested positive association between obesity and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma has prompted us to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of malignant lymphoma subtypes in a population-based case-control study. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted with 3055 case patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 618 case patients with Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between October 1, 1999, and August 30, 2002, and 3187 population-based control subjects. The interviews assessed current height, normal adult weight, and other possible risk factors. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of lymphoma were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: BMI was not associated with risk of overall non-Hodgkin lymphoma or of Hodgkin lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group [BMI greater than or equal to35.0 kg/m(2)] with the normal-weight group [BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)], OR for risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6 to 1.3; P-trend across all categories of BMI = .27). BMI was also not associated with risk of any non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype evaluated, although there was some evidence of a positive association with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group with the normal-weight group, OR for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.9 to 2.4; P-trend = .05). Conclusions: Excess weight does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphoma in general, or with a risk of most major lymphoma subtypes. Hence, the growing incidence of obesity is unlikely to be an important contributor to the increasing incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide.
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