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Sökning: WFRF:(LaRocca Renato)

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1.
  • Morabito, Fortunato, et al. (författare)
  • Bortezomib, melphalan, prednisone (VMP) versus melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide (MPT) in elderly newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients: A retrospective case-matched study
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Hematology. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0361-8609. ; 89:4, s. 355-362
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Novel agents in combination with melphalan and prednisone (MP) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in multiple myeloma (MM). Randomized trials comparing MP plus bortezomib (VMP) versus MP plus thalidomide (MPT) are lacking. Nine hundred and fifty-six elderly (>65 years) newly diagnosed MM patients from six European randomized trials were retrospectively analyzed and matched for age, albumin, and beta2-microglobulin at diagnosis, 296 patients were selected from the VMP groups, and 294 from MPT. Complete response rate was 21% in the VMP patients and 13% in the MPT patients (P=0.007). After a median follow-up of 34 months (range, 1-92), VMP significantly prolonged both PFS (median 32.5 vs. 22.9 months, HR 0.65; 95% CI 0.52-0.82; P<0.001) and OS (median 79.7 vs. 45.1 months, HR 0.44; 95% CI 0.32-0.59; P<0.001) in comparison with MPT. The benefit in terms of OS of the VMP group was quite similar among patients with different risk factors defined by sex, ISS, ECOG performance status, or serum creatinine but not among patients 75 years. Multivariate analysis confirmed that VMP was an independent predictor of longer PFS and OS. In a control-case matched analysis, PFS and OS were prolonged in patients who received VMP in comparison with those treated with MPT. Am. J. Hematol. 89:355-362, 2014. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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2.
  • Ostrom, Quinn T., et al. (författare)
  • Evaluating glioma risk associated with extent of European admixture in African-Americans and Latinos
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Cancer Research. - American Association for Cancer Research. - 0008-5472 .- 1538-7445. ; 78:13
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • <p>Glioma incidence is highest in non-Hispanic Whites, where it occurs ~2x as frequently compared with other race/ethnicity groups. Glioma GWAS to date have included European ancestry populations only, and it is unknown whether variants identified by these analyses are associated with glioma in non- European ancestry populations. African Americans and Hispanics are admixed populations with varying proportions of European ancestry. While global ancestry may be similar within admixed groups, the proportion of European ancestry at each allele can vary across the genome. As glioma is more common in European ancestry populations, the presence of increased local European ancestry in these admixed populations could be used to identify glioma risk loci. Here we assessed whether excess European ancestry at established risk loci (Melin et al, Nature Genetics, 2017) was associated with glioma risk in non-European ancestry populations. Global ancestry was estimated using fastStructure, and local ancestry was estimated using RFMix. Both methods used 1,000 genomes project reference populations (African: YRI; European: CEU; East Asian: CHB/JPT; and Native American: CLM/PEL/MXL). We evaluated differences in local European ancestry between cases and controls using logistic regression conditioned on global European ancestry within 500kb of 25 previously identified risk variants among individuals with ≥50% African ancestry, and ≥30% Native American ancestry for all gliomas, and for grade IV glioblastoma (GBM) and grade II-III non-GBM. There were 347 individuals (184 cases and 163 controls) with ≥50% global African ancestry, and 277 individuals (153 cases and 124 controls) with ≥30% global American ancestry. There was no significant difference in proportion of global European ancestry between cases and controls with ≥50% global African ancestry (cases: 18.2%, controls: 17.7%, p=0.6834), and no significant difference in proportion of global European ancestry between cases and controls with ≥30% global American ancestry (cases: 51.1%, controls: 49.0%, p=0.2123). Among individuals with &gt;50% African ancestry, we observed a nominally significant association between all glioma and increased local European ancestry at 7p11.2 (EGFR, pmin=0.0070) and between GBM and increased local European ancestry at 22q13.1 (CSNK1E, pmin=0.0098), both near SNPs previously associated with glioblastoma in majority European-ancestry populations. The dataset used for this analysis represents the largest collection of genotyped non-European glioma cases. These results suggest that glioma risk in African Americans may be associated with an increased local European ancestry variants at glioma risk loci previously identified in majority European ancestry populations (7p11.2 and 22q13.1).</p>
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3.
  • Ostrom, Quinn T., et al. (författare)
  • Glioma risk associated with extent of estimated European genetic ancestry in African Americans and Hispanics
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley & Sons. - 0020-7136 .- 1097-0215. ; 146:3, s. 739-748
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Glioma incidence is highest in non-Hispanic Whites, and to date, glioma genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to date have only included European ancestry (EA) populations. African Americans and Hispanics in the US have varying proportions of EA, African (AA) and Native American ancestries (NAA). It is unknown if identified GWAS loci or increased EA is associated with increased glioma risk. We assessed whether EA was associated with glioma in African Americans and Hispanics. Data were obtained for 832 cases and 675 controls from the Glioma International Case-Control Study and GliomaSE Case-Control Study previously estimated to have &lt;80% EA, or self-identify as non-White. We estimated global and local ancestry using fastStructure and RFMix, respectively, using 1,000 genomes project reference populations. Within groups with &gt;= 40% AA (AFR(&gt;= 0.4)), and &gt;= 15% NAA (AMR(&gt;= 0.15)), genome-wide association between local EA and glioma was evaluated using logistic regression conditioned on global EA for all gliomas. We identified two regions (7q21.11, p = 6.36 x 10(-4); 11p11.12, p = 7.0 x 10-4) associated with increased EA, and one associated with decreased EA (20p12.13, p = 0.0026) in AFR(&gt;= 0.4). In addition, we identified a peak at rs1620291 (p = 4.36 x 10(-6)) in 7q21.3. Among AMR(&gt;= 0.15), we found an association between increased EA in one region (12q24.21, p = 8.38 x 10(-4)), and decreased EA in two regions (8q24.21, p = 0. 0010; 20q13.33, p = 6.36 x 10(-4)). No other significant associations were identified. This analysis identified an association between glioma and two regions previously identified in EA populations (8q24.21, 20q13.33) and four novel regions (7q21.11, 11p11.12, 12q24.21 and 20p12.13). The identifications of novel association with EA suggest regions to target for future genetic association studies. What's new? Glioma is rare in non-White populations, and most glioma genome-wide association studies have included only primarily European ancestry populations. Here, the authors assess whether variation in European ancestry is associated with glioma risk in populations with a combination of European, African and Native American ancestry. Based on African American and Hispanic cases from two large glioma case-control studies, this analysis shows that increased European ancestry in admixed populations may be associated with increased glioma risk. The associations between glioma and two chromosomal regions previously identified in European ancestry populations, and four novel regions, may guide future studies.</p>
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