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Sökning: WFRF:(Langhorne P)

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  • Dennis, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Effects of fluoxetine on functional outcomes after acute stroke (FOCUS) : a pragmatic, double-blind, randomised, controlled trial
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - 0140-6736 .- 1474-547X. ; 393:10168, s. 265-274
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Results of small trials indicate that fluoxetine might improve functional outcomes after stroke. The FOCUS trial aimed to provide a precise estimate of these effects.Methods FOCUS was a pragmatic, multicentre, parallel group, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial done at 103 hospitals in the UK. Patients were eligible if they were aged 18 years or older, had a clinical stroke diagnosis, were enrolled and randomly assigned between 2 days and 15 days after onset, and had focal neurological deficits. Patients were randomly allocated fluoxetine 20 mg or matching placebo orally once daily for 6 months via a web-based system by use of a minimisation algorithm. The primary outcome was functional status, measured with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), at 6 months. Patients, carers, health-care staff, and the trial team were masked to treatment allocation. Functional status was assessed at 6 months and 12 months after randomisation. Patients were analysed according to their treatment allocation. This trial is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN83290762.Findings Between Sept 10,2012, and March 31,2017,3127 patients were recruited. 1564 patients were allocated fluoxetine and 1563 allocated placebo. mRS data at 6 months were available for 1553 (99.3%) patients in each treatment group. The distribution across mRS categories at 6 months was similar in the fluoxetine and placebo groups (common odds ratio adjusted for minimisation variables 0.951 [95% CI 0.839-1.079]; p=0.439). Patients allocated fluoxetine were less likely than those allocated placebo to develop new depression by 6 months (210 [13.43%] patients vs 269 [17.21%]; difference 3.78% [95% CI 1.26-6.30]; p=0.0033), but they had more bone fractures (45 [2.88%] vs 23 [1.47%]; difference 1.41% [95% CI 0.38-2.43]; p=0.0070). There were no significant differences in any other event at 6 or 12 months.Interpretation Fluoxetine 20 mg given daily for 6 months after acute stroke does not seem to improve functional outcomes. Although the treatment reduced the occurrence of depression, it increased the frequency of bone fractures. These results do not support the routine use of fluoxetine either for the prevention of post-stroke depression or to promote recovery of function.
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  • Kreisel, S. H., et al. (författare)
  • Deterioration of Gait and Balance over Time: The Effects of Age-Related White Matter Change - The LADIS Study
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Cerebrovascular Diseases. - 1015-9770. ; 35:6, s. 544-553
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Cross-sectional studies have shown an association between the severity of age-related white matter change (ARWMC) and lower body motor function. However, the association between prevalent ARWMC and incident deterioration of balance and gait remains insufficiently investigated. This study investigates if the degree of prevalent ARWMC has a differential effect on lower body motor function as it changes over time, hypothesizing that individuals with more severe baseline white matter pathology experience greater clinical deterioration independent of potential confounders. This is of clinical relevance: given the increasing use of neuroimaging, incidental white matter pathology is common; being able to delineate natural trajectories of balance and gait function given ARWMC may improve patient advice and help optimize allocation of care. Methods: 639 non-disabled elderly individuals with prevalent ARWMC (grading of severity of ARWMC using the Fazekas scale) were followed up yearly for 3 years, as part of the Leukoaraiosis and Disability Study. The primary outcome variable, reflecting the temporal course of gait and balance function, was the change of scores on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) over time versus the severity of ARWMC. We used linear mixed modelling to analyse change over time. Explorative analysis was carried out investigating the effect of age on potential deterioration of gait and balance function. We used propensity scores to adjust for multiple confounders that affect both the exposure (i. e. ARWMC) and outcome. Results: Subjects' lower body motor function deteriorated by 2.6% per year. However, after adjustment for baseline motor impairment and potential confounders, only subjects with moderate [-0.22 points per year on the SPPB (equals -2.3%); 95% CI -0.35 to -0.09, p < 0.001] or severe [-0.46 points per year (equals -4.7%); 95% CI -0.63 to -0.28, p < 0.0001] ARWMC show a loss of function. Age shows differential effects: relatively younger elderly subjects have similar temporal dynamics in SPPB change independent of their individual degree of ARWMC severity; however, subjects with severe ARWMC and who are older than 75.9 years deteriorate significantly more rapidly than their counterparts with only mild or moderate white matter pathology. Conclusion: Only moderate and severe ARWMC is independently associated -on average -with a deterioration of gait and balance. Albeit the possibility of unmeasured confounding and other methodological constraints, there is nonetheless evidence of large interindividual variability: some subjects with moderate or severe ARWMC stay stable over time or even show improvement. Furthermore, there is explorative analysis showing that younger elderly subjects may be able to better compensate even severe ARWMC. These individuals' gait and balance function stays relatively stable over time, whereas their older counterparts deteriorate significantly. This may point towards a threshold effect given ARWMC.
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  • Poggesi, A., et al. (författare)
  • Cerebral white matter changes are associated with abnormalities on neurological examination in non-disabled elderly: the LADIS study
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Journal of Neurology. - 0340-5354 .- 1432-1459. ; 260:4, s. 1014-1021
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Cerebral white matter changes (WMC) are associated with motor, cognitive, mood, urinary disturbances, and disability, but little is known about the prevalence of neurological signs in patients with these brain lesions. We assessed the presence and occurrence of neurological abnormalities over a 3-year period and their possible associations with WMC in a cohort of initially non-disabled elderly subjects. Data from the multicenter Leukoaraiosis And DISability study were used. A standard neurological examination was performed at baseline and at each of the annual follow-up visits. A standard MRI scan was performed at baseline and after 3-years. WMC severity was graded as mild, moderate, or severe on the Fazekas scale, while the Rotterdam scale was used to assess progression. Infarcts and their occurrence were also assessed. Six hundred and thirty-nine non-disabled subjects were enrolled (mean age 74.1 +/- A 5.0, M/F: 288/351). Severe WMC at baseline were associated with gait and stance abnormalities, upper motor signs, and fingertap slowing. This effect was independent of age, sex, lacunar and non-lacunar infarcts. The occurrence of stance abnormalities, upper motor signs, primitive reflexes and fingertap slowing during the 3-year follow-up period was associated with both baseline WMC load and their progression. The occurrence of the same abnormalities plus extrapyramidal and primitive reflexes was associated with incident lacunar infarcts. In our cohort of non-disabled elders, severe WMC were associated with the presence and the occurrence of neurological signs, independently of other vascular brain lesions, confirming that these lesions have clinical relevance.
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  • Poggesi, A., et al. (författare)
  • Neurological abnormalities predict disability: the LADIS (Leukoaraiosis And DISability) study
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Journal of Neurology. - 0340-5354 .- 1432-1459. ; 261:6, s. 1160-1169
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination was performed. MRI assessment included age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) grading (mild, moderate, severe according to the Fazekas' scale), count of lacunar and non-lacunar infarcts, and global atrophy rating. Of the 633 (out of the 639 enrolled) patients with follow-up information (mean age 74.1 +/- A 5.0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with a parts per thousand yen1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological abnormality independently predicted transition to disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 1.53 (1.01-2.34)]. The hazard increased with increasing number of abnormalities. Among MRI lesions, only ARWMC of severe grade independently predicted disability or death [HR (95 % CI) 2.18 (1.37-3.48)]. In our cohort, presence and number of neurological examination abnormalities predicted global functional decline independent of MRI lesions typical of the aging brain and other determinants of disability in the elderly. Systematically checking for neurological examination abnormalities in older patients may be cost-effective in identifying those at risk of functional decline.
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7.
  • O'Donnell, M. J., et al. (författare)
  • Global and regional effects of potentially modifiable risk factors associated with acute stroke in 32 countries (INTERSTROKE): a case-control study
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Lancet. - 0140-6736 .- 1474-547X. ; 388:10046
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the importance of potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke in different regions of the world, and in key populations and primary pathological subtypes of stroke. METHODS: We completed a standardised international case-control study in 32 countries in Asia, America, Europe, Australia, the Middle East, and Africa. Cases were patients with acute first stroke (within 5 days of symptom onset and 72 h of hospital admission). Controls were hospital-based or community-based individuals with no history of stroke, and were matched with cases, recruited in a 1:1 ratio, for age and sex. All participants completed a clinical assessment and were requested to provide blood and urine samples. Odds ratios (OR) and their population attributable risks (PARs) were calculated, with 99% confidence intervals. FINDINGS: Between Jan 11, 2007, and Aug 8, 2015, 26 919 participants were recruited from 32 countries (13 447 cases [10 388 with ischaemic stroke and 3059 intracerebral haemorrhage] and 13 472 controls). Previous history of hypertension or blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg or higher (OR 2.98, 99% CI 2.72-3.28; PAR 47.9%, 99% CI 45.1-50.6), regular physical activity (0.60, 0.52-0.70; 35.8%, 27.7-44.7), apolipoprotein (Apo)B/ApoA1 ratio (1.84, 1.65-2.06 for highest vs lowest tertile; 26.8%, 22.2-31.9 for top two tertiles vs lowest tertile), diet (0.60, 0.53-0.67 for highest vs lowest tertile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index [mAHEI]; 23.2%, 18.2-28.9 for lowest two tertiles vs highest tertile of mAHEI), waist-to-hip ratio (1.44, 1.27-1.64 for highest vs lowest tertile; 18.6%, 13.3-25.3 for top two tertiles vs lowest), psychosocial factors (2.20, 1.78-2.72; 17.4%, 13.1-22.6), current smoking (1.67, 1.49-1.87; 12.4%, 10.2-14.9), cardiac causes (3.17, 2.68-3.75; 9.1%, 8.0-10.2), alcohol consumption (2.09, 1.64-2.67 for high or heavy episodic intake vs never or former drinker; 5.8%, 3.4-9.7 for current alcohol drinker vs never or former drinker), and diabetes mellitus (1.16, 1.05-1.30; 3.9%, 1.9-7.6) were associated with all stroke. Collectively, these risk factors accounted for 90.7% of the PAR for all stroke worldwide (91.5% for ischaemic stroke, 87.1% for intracerebral haemorrhage), and were consistent across regions (ranging from 82.7% in Africa to 97.4% in southeast Asia), sex (90.6% in men and in women), and age groups (92.2% in patients aged 55 years). We observed regional variations in the importance of individual risk factors, which were related to variations in the magnitude of ORs (rather than direction, which we observed for diet) and differences in prevalence of risk factors among regions. Hypertension was more associated with intracerebral haemorrhage than with ischaemic stroke, whereas current smoking, diabetes, apolipoproteins, and cardiac causes were more associated with ischaemic stroke (p<0.0001). INTERPRETATION: Ten potentially modifiable risk factors are collectively associated with about 90% of the PAR of stroke in each major region of the world, among ethnic groups, in men and women, and in all ages. However, we found important regional variations in the relative importance of most individual risk factors for stroke, which could contribute to worldwide variations in frequency and case-mix of stroke. Our findings support developing both global and region-specific programmes to prevent stroke. FUNDING: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Canadian Stroke Network, Health Research Board Ireland, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation, The Health & Medical Care Committee of the Regional Executive Board, Region Vastra Gotaland (Sweden), AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada), Pfizer (Canada), MSD, Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland, and The Stroke Association, with support from The UK Stroke Research Network.
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  • Firbank, M. J., et al. (författare)
  • Relationship between progression of brain white matter changes and late-life depression: 3-year results from the LADIS study
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Psychiatry. - 0007-1250. ; 201:1, s. 40-45
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Brain white matter changes (WMC) and depressive symptoms are linked, but the directionality of this association remains unclear. Aims To investigate the relationship between baseline and incident depression and progression of white matter changes. Method In a longitudinal multicentre pan-European study (Leukoaraiosis and Disability in the elderly, LADIS), participants aged over 64 underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical assessments. Repeat scans were obtained at 3 years. Depressive outcomes were assessed in terms of depressive episodes and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Progression of WMC was measured using the modified Rotterdam Progression scale. Results Progression of WMC was significantly associated with incident depression during year 3 of the study (P = 0.002) and remained significant after controlling for transition to disability, baseline WMC and baseline history of depression. There was no significant association between progression of WMC and GDS score, and no significant relationship between progression of WMC and history of depression at baseline. Conclusions Our results support the vascular depression hypothesis and implicate WMC as causal in the pathogenesis of late-life depression.
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  • Langhorne, Peter, et al. (författare)
  • Practice patterns and outcomes after stroke across countries at different economic levels (INTERSTROKE): an international observational study.
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Lancet (London, England). - 1474-547X. ; 391:10134, s. 2019-2027
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Stroke disproportionately affects people in low-income and middle-income countries. Although improvements in stroke care and outcomes have been reported in high-income countries, little is known about practice and outcomes in low and middle-income countries. We aimed to compare patterns of care available and their association with patient outcomes across countries at different economic levels.We studied the patterns and effect of practice variations (ie, treatments used and access to services) among participants in the INTERSTROKE study, an international observational study that enrolled 13 447 stroke patients from 142 clinical sites in 32 countries between Jan 11, 2007, and Aug 8, 2015. We supplemented patient data with a questionnaire about health-care and stroke service facilities at all participating hospitals. Using univariate and multivariate regression analyses to account for patient casemix and service clustering, we estimated the association between services available, treatments given, and patient outcomes (death or dependency) at 1 month.We obtained full information for 12 342 (92%) of 13 447 INTERSTROKE patients, from 108 hospitals in 28 countries; 2576 from 38 hospitals in ten high-income countries and 9766 from 70 hospitals in 18 low and middle-income countries. Patients in low-income and middle-income countries more often had severe strokes, intracerebral haemorrhage, poorer access to services, and used fewer investigations and treatments (p<0·0001) than those in high-income countries, although only differences in patient characteristics explained the poorer clinical outcomes in low and middle-income countries. However across all countries, irrespective of economic level, access to a stroke unit was associated with improved use of investigations and treatments, access to other rehabilitation services, and improved survival without severe dependency (odds ratio [OR] 1·29; 95% CI 1·14-1·44; all p<0·0001), which was independent of patient casemix characteristics and other measures of care. Use of acute antiplatelet treatment was associated with improved survival (1·39; 1·12-1·72) irrespective of other patient and service characteristics.Evidence-based treatments, diagnostics, and stroke units were less commonly available or used in low and middle-income countries. Access to stroke units and appropriate use of antiplatelet treatment were associated with improved recovery. Improved care and facilities in low-income and middle-income countries are essential to improve outcomes.Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland.
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