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1.
  • Huyghe, Jeroen R., et al. (författare)
  • Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - Nature Publishing Group. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 51:1, s. 76-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P &lt; 5 x 10(-8), bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to similar to 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Kruppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.</p>
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2.
  • Huyghe, Jeroen R., et al. (författare)
  • Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 51:1, s. 76-87
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P &lt; 5 x 10(-8), bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to similar to 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Kruppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.</p>
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3.
  • Orejas, C, et al. (författare)
  • Cold-water corals in aquaria: advances and challenges. A focus on the Mediterranean
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Mediterranean Cold-Water Corals: Past, Present and Future. - Springer. - 2213-719X. - 978-3-319-91607-1
  • Bokkapitel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Knowledge on basic biological functions of organisms is essential to understand not only the role they play in the ecosystems but also to manage and protect their populations. The study of biological processes, such as growth, reproduction and physiology, which can be approached in situ or by collecting exemplars and rearing them in aquaria, is particularly challenging for deep-sea organisms such as cold-water corals (CWCs). Present experimental work and monitoring of deep-sea populations is still a chimera. Only a handful of research institutes or companies have been able to install in situ marine observatories in the Mediterranean Sea or elsewhere, which facilitate for a continuous monitoring of deep-sea ecosystems. Hence, today’s best way to obtain basic biological information on these organisms is (1) working with collected samples and analysing them post-mortem and / or (2) cultivating corals in aquaria in order to monitor biological processes and investigate coral behaviour and physiological responses under different experimental treatments. The first challenging aspect is the collection process, which implies the use of oceanographic research vessels in most occasions, since these organisms inhabit areas between ca. 150 m to more than 1,000 m depth, and specific sampling gears. The next challenge is the maintenance of the animals on board (in situations where cruises may take weeks) and their transport to home laboratories. Maintenance in the home labs is also extremely challenging since special conditions and set ups are needed to conduct experimental studies to obtain information on the biological processes of these animals. The complexity of the natural environment from which the corals were collected cannot be exactly replicated within the laboratory setting; a fact which has led some researchers to question the validity of work and conclusions drawn from such undertakings. It is evident that aquaria experiments cannot perfectly reflect the real environmental and trophic conditions where these organisms occur, but: (1) in most cases we do not have the possibility to obtain equivalent in situ information and (2) even with limitations, they produce relevant information about 117 the biological limits of the species, which is especially valuable when considering potential future climate change scenarios. This chapter includes many contributions from different authors and it intends to be both, a practical “handbook” for conducting CWC aquaria work, while at the same time, to offer an overview on the CWC research conducted in Mediterranean labs equipped with aquaria infrastructure. Experiences from Atlantic and Pacific laboratories with extensive experience with CWC work have also contributed to this chapter, as their procedures are valuable to any researcher interested in conducting experimental work with CWC in aquaria. It was impossible to include contributions from all labs in the world currently working experimentally with CWCs in the laboratory, but at the conclusion of the chapter we attempt, to our best of our knowledge, to supply a list of laboratories with operational CWC aquaria facilities.
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4.
  • McNabb, Sarah, et al. (författare)
  • Meta-analysis of 16 studies of the association of alcohol with colorectal cancer
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - 0020-7136 .- 1097-0215. ; 146:3, s. 861-873
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). However, while studies have consistently reported elevated risk of CRC among heavy drinkers, associations at moderate levels of alcohol consumption are less clear. We conducted a combined analysis of 16 studies of CRC to examine the shape of the alcohol-CRC association, investigate potential effect modifiers of the association, and examine differential effects of alcohol consumption by cancer anatomic site and stage. We collected information on alcohol consumption for 14,276 CRC cases and 15,802 controls from 5 case-control and 11 nested case-control studies of CRC. We compared adjusted logistic regression models with linear and restricted cubic splines to select a model that best fit the association between alcohol consumption and CRC. Study-specific results were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis. Compared to non-/occasional drinking (&lt;= 1 g/day), light/moderate drinking (up to 2 drinks/day) was associated with a decreased risk of CRC (odds ratio [OR]: 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88-0.98, p = 0.005), heavy drinking (2-3 drinks/day) was not significantly associated with CRC risk (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.99-1.24, p = 0.08) and very heavy drinking (more than 3 drinks/day) was associated with a significant increased risk (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.11-1.40, p &lt; 0.001). We observed no evidence of interactions with lifestyle risk factors or of differences by cancer site or stage. These results provide further evidence that there is a J-shaped association between alcohol consumption and CRC risk. This overall pattern was not significantly modified by other CRC risk factors and there was no effect heterogeneity by tumor site or stage.</p>
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5.
  • Sarajlic, P, et al. (författare)
  • Enhanced ventricular-arterial coupling during a 2-year physical activity programme in patients with rheumatoid arthritis a prospective substudy of the physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis 2010 trial.
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Journal of Internal Medicine. - 0954-6820 .- 1365-2796. ; 284:6, s. 664-673
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>OBJECTIVE:</strong> To establish how guided physical activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without known cardiovascular disease affected vascular and cardiac function, and how these two entities were prospectively interconnected in this patient group.</p><p><strong>METHODS:</strong> Prospective substudy of 29 participants in the Physical Activity in RA (PARA) 2010 trial. All subjects were examined at baseline, at year 1 and 2 with measures of pulse wave velocity and arterial augmentation index, as well as echocardiographic evaluation of diastolic parameters and ventricular-arterial coupling. Muscle strength and aerobic exercise capacity were assessed at baseline and yearly. All participants performed physiotherapist-guided aerobic and muscle strength exercise during 2 years and were reminded through SMS to report physical activity progress.</p><p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> This cohort of patients with RA exhibited increased vascular stiffness despite normal blood pressure. At baseline, lower muscle strength was associated with increased vascular stiffness (β = 0.68; P = 0.004), whereas lower aerobic working capacity was associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (β = 0.85; P = 0.03). There was a significant positive correlation between vascular stiffness and diastolic dysfunction at baseline (R<sup>2</sup>  = 0.64) and for the changes in those parameters observed during 2 years of guided physical activity. Finally, a significant improvement in ventricular-arterial coupling was observed after exercise (P &lt; 0.001).</p><p><strong>CONCLUSION:</strong> These results indicate that although differentially associated with physical capacity parameters, improved vascular stiffness and improved diastolic dysfunction are interrelated, and that an optimization of the ventricular-arterial coupling may contribute to the beneficial effects of physical activity in patients with RA.</p>
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6.
  • Wahlberg, Karin E, et al. (författare)
  • Polymorphisms in Manganese Transporters SLC30A10 and SLC39A8 Are Associated With Children's Neurodevelopment by Influencing Manganese Homeostasis
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Frontiers in Genetics. - Frontiers. - 1664-8021. ; 9
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Manganese (Mn) is an essential element but at excessive levels, it is neurotoxic. Even a moderate increase in Mn has been suggested to interfere with neurodevelopment in children. Genetics influencing Mn concentrations and toxicity is unclear. Objective: We assessed, in a cross-sectional study, whether common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the Mn transporters SLC39A8 (influx) and SLC30A10 (efflux) are associated with neurodevelopment in children. Design: We genotyped SLC39A8 (rs13107325 C/T) and SLC30A10 (rs1776029 G/A and rs12064812 T/C) in Italian children (n = 686, ages 11-14). We then used linear regression models to analyze associations between genotype, blood Mn concentrations, and neurodevelopmental outcomes including intelligence, behavior, motor function, and sway. Inferred causal relationships were evaluated using instrumental variables (IV) analysis. Results: For SLC30A10 rs1776029, the minor allele (A) was associated with increased average blood Mn of 41% (p < 0.001), whereas minor alleles for rs12064812 (C) and rs13107325 (T) were associated with reduced blood Mn of 7% (p = 0.002) and 15% (p < 0.001), respectively. For children carrying genotypes associated with high blood Mn, we observed lower performance for certain IQ subtests, increased sway, and increased scores for behavioral problems. High Mn genotypes showed odds ratios of 2-4 (p ≤ 0.01) for high scores in tests assessing ADHD-related behavior. IV analyses suggested that several of the associations were mediated by blood Mn. Conclusions: Our results suggest that common polymorphisms in SLC39A8 and SLC30A10 influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in children via differences in Mn homeostasis.
7.
  • Hindy, George, et al. (författare)
  • Role of blood lipids in the development of ischemic stroke and its subtypes : A mendelian randomization study
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Stroke. - American Heart Association. - 0039-2499. ; 49:4, s. 820-827
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background and Purpose-Statin therapy is associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke supporting a causal role of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. However, more evidence is needed to answer the question whether LDL cholesterol plays a causal role in ischemic stroke subtypes. In addition, it is unknown whether high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides have a causal relationship to ischemic stroke and its subtypes. Our aim was to investigate the causal role of LDL cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides in ischemic stroke and its subtypes through Mendelian randomization (MR). Methods-Summary data on 185 genome-wide lipids-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were obtained from the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium and the Stroke Genetics Network for their association with ischemic stroke (n=16 851 cases and 32 473 controls) and its subtypes, including large artery atherosclerosis (n=2410), small artery occlusion (n=3186), and cardioembolic (n=3427) stroke. Inverse-variance-weighted MR was used to obtain the causal estimates. Inversevariance- weighted multivariable MR, MR-Egger, and sensitivity exclusion of pleiotropic single nucleotide polymorphisms after Steiger filtering and MR-Pleiotropy Residual Sum and Outlier test were used to adjust for pleiotropic bias. Results-A 1-SD genetically elevated LDL cholesterol was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke (odds ratio: 1.12; 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.20) and large artery atherosclerosis stroke (odds ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.49) but not with small artery occlusion or cardioembolic stroke in multivariable MR. A 1-SD genetically elevated high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was associated with a decreased risk of small artery occlusion stroke (odds ratio: 0.79; 95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.90) in multivariable MR. MR-Egger indicated no pleiotropic bias, and results did not markedly change after sensitivity exclusion of pleiotropic single nucleotide polymorphisms. Genetically elevated triglycerides did not associate with ischemic stroke or its subtypes. Conclusions-LDL cholesterol lowering is likely to prevent large artery atherosclerosis but may not prevent small artery occlusion nor cardioembolic strokes. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol elevation may lead to benefits in small artery disease prevention. Finally, triglyceride lowering may not yield benefits in ischemic stroke and its subtypes.
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8.
  • Larsson, Susanna C., et al. (författare)
  • Type 2 diabetes, glucose, insulin, BMI, and ischemic stroke subtypes : Mendelian randomization study
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Neurology. - 0028-3878 .- 1526-632X. ; 89:5, s. 454-460
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>OBJECTIVE:</strong> To implement a mendelian randomization (MR) approach to determine whether type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and body mass index (BMI) are causally associated with specific ischemic stroke subtypes.</p><p><strong>METHODS:</strong> MR estimates of the association between each possible risk factor and ischemic stroke subtypes were calculated with inverse-variance weighted (conventional) and weighted median approaches, and MR-Egger regression was used to explore pleiotropy. The number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) used as instrumental variables was 49 for T2D, 36 for fasting glucose, 18 for fasting insulin, and 77 for BMI. Genome-wide association study data of SNP-stroke associations were derived from METASTROKE and the Stroke Genetics Network (n = 18,476 ischemic stroke cases and 37,296 controls).</p><p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> Conventional MR analysis showed associations between genetically predicted T2D and large artery stroke (odds ratio [OR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-1.40, <em>p</em> = 3.3 × 10<sup>-7</sup>) and small vessel stroke (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.33, <em>p</em> = 8.9 × 10<sup>-5</sup>) but not cardioembolic stroke (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.97-1.15, <em>p</em> = 0.17). The association of T2D with large artery stroke but not small vessel stroke was consistent in a sensitivity analysis using the weighted median method, and there was no evidence of pleiotropy. Genetically predicted fasting glucose and fasting insulin levels and BMI were not statistically significantly associated with any ischemic stroke subtype.</p><p><strong>CONCLUSIONS:</strong> This study provides support that T2D may be causally associated with large artery stroke.</p>
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9.
  • Larsson, Susanna C., et al. (författare)
  • Type 2 diabetes, glucose, insulin, BMI, and ischemic stroke subtypes : Mendelian randomization study
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Neurology. - American Academy of Neurology. - 0028-3878. ; 89:5, s. 454-460
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: To implement a mendelian randomization (MR) approach to determine whether type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and body mass index (BMI) are causally associated with specific ischemic stroke subtypes. Methods: MR estimates of the association between each possible risk factor and ischemic stroke subtypes were calculated with inverse-variance weighted (conventional) and weighted median approaches, and MR-Egger regression was used to explore pleiotropy. The number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) used as instrumental variables was 49 for T2D, 36 for fasting glucose, 18 for fasting insulin, and 77 for BMI. Genome-wide association study data of SNPstroke associations were derived from METASTROKE and the Stroke Genetics Network (n 5 18,476 ischemic stroke cases and 37,296 controls). Results: Conventional MR analysis showed associations between genetically predicted T2D and large artery stroke (odds ratio [OR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-1.40, p 5 3.3 3 1027) and small vessel stroke (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.33, p 5 8.9 3 1025) but not cardioembolic stroke (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.97-1.15, p 5 0.17). The association of T2D with large artery stroke but not small vessel stroke was consistent in a sensitivity analysis using the weighted median method, and there was no evidence of pleiotropy. Genetically predicted fasting glucose and fasting insulin levels and BMI were not statistically significantly associated with any ischemic stroke subtype.
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10.
  • Laskar, Ruhina S, et al. (författare)
  • Sex specific associations in genome wide association analysis of renal cell carcinoma
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Human Genetics. - Nature Publishing Group. - 1018-4813 .- 1476-5438. ; 27:10, s. 1589-1598
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has an undisputed genetic component and a stable 2:1 male to female sex ratio in its incidence across populations, suggesting possible sexual dimorphism in its genetic susceptibility. We conducted the first sex-specific genome-wide association analysis of RCC for men (3227 cases, 4916 controls) and women (1992 cases, 3095 controls) of European ancestry from two RCC genome-wide scans and replicated the top findings using an additional series of men (2261 cases, 5852 controls) and women (1399 cases, 1575 controls) from two independent cohorts of European origin. Our study confirmed sex-specific associations for two known RCC risk loci at 14q24.2 (DPF3) and 2p21(EPAS1). We also identified two additional suggestive male-specific loci at 6q24.3 (SAMD5, male odds ratio (OR<sub>male</sub>) = 0.83 [95% CI = 0.78-0.89], P<sub>male</sub> = 1.71 × 10<sup>-8</sup> compared with female odds ratio (OR<sub>female</sub>) = 0.98 [95% CI = 0.90-1.07], P<sub>female</sub> = 0.68) and 12q23.3 (intergenic, OR<sub>male</sub> = 0.75 [95% CI = 0.68-0.83], P<sub>male</sub> = 1.59 × 10<sup>-8</sup> compared with OR<sub>female</sub> = 0.93 [95% CI = 0.82-1.06], P<sub>female</sub> = 0.21) that attained genome-wide significance in the joint meta-analysis. Herein, we provide evidence of sex-specific associations in RCC genetic susceptibility and advocate the necessity of larger genetic and genomic studies to unravel the endogenous causes of sex bias in sexually dimorphic traits and diseases like RCC.</p>
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