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Sökning: WFRF:(Nienaber Christoph A.)

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1.
  • Jander, Nikolaus, et al. (författare)
  • Velocity ratio predicts outcomes in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved EF
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Heart. - 1355-6037. ; 100:24, s. 1946-1953
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective To evaluate the usefulness of velocity ratio (VR) in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis (LGSAS) and preserved EF.Background LGSAS despite preserved EF represents a clinically challenging entity. Reliance on mean pressure gradient (MPG) may underestimate stenosis severity as has been reported in the context of paradoxical low flow, LGSAS. On the other hand, grading of stenosis severity by aortic valve area (AVA) may overrate stenosis severity due to erroneous underestimation of LV outflow tract (LVOT) diameter, small body size or inconsistencies in cut-off values for severe stenosis. We hypothesised that VR may have conceptual advantages over MPG and AVA, predict clinical outcomes and thereby be useful in the management of patients with LGSAS.Methods Patients from the prospective Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study with an AVA<1.0 cm(2), MPG <= 40 mm Hg and EF >= 55% and asymptomatic at baseline were stratified according to VR with a cut-off value of 0.25. Outcomes were evaluated according to aortic valve-related events and cardiovascular death.Results Of 435 patients with LGSAS, 197 (45%) had VR<0.25 suggesting severe and 238 (55%) had VR >= 0.25 suggesting non-severe stenosis. Aortic valve-related events (mean follow-up 42 +/- 14 months) were more frequent in patients with VR<0.25 (57% vs 41%; p<0.001) as was cardiovascular death within the first 24 months (p<0.05). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, MPG was the strongest independent predictor of aortic valve events (p<0.001) followed by VR (p<0.02). Adjusting AVA by VR increased predictive accuracy for aortic valve events (area under the receiver operating curve 0.62 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.67) vs 0.56 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.61) for AVA, p=0.02) with net reclassification improvement calculated at 0.36 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.54, p<0.001). VR did not improve the prediction of clinical events by MPG.Conclusions In the difficult setting of LGSAS, VR shows a strong association with valve-related events and - although not outperforming MPG-may be particularly useful in guiding clinical management.
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2.
  • Minners, Jan, et al. (författare)
  • Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Heart. - BMJ Publishing Group. - 1355-6037. ; 100:13, s. 1024-1030
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Adjustment of cardiac dimensions by measures of body size appears intuitively convincing and in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is commonly adjusted by body surface area (BSA). However, there is little evidence to support such an approach. Objective To identify the adequate measure of body size for the adjustment of aortic stenosis severity. Methods Parameters of aortic stenosis severity (jet velocity, mean pressure gradient (MPG) and AVA) and measures of body size (height, weight, BSA and body mass index (BMI)) were analysed in 2843 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis (jet velocity >= 2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Results Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson correlation coefficient (r) 0.319, 0.281, 0.317 and 0.126, respectively, all p<0.001) to the effect that larger patients presented with larger AVA (less severe stenosis). Of the anthropometric measures used for linear adjustment, BSA was most effective in eliminating the correlation between AVA and body size (r=0.007), rivalled only by allometric (non-linear) models, findings that are confirmed in 1525 prospectively followed patients from the SEAS study. Predictive accuracy for aortic valve events and cardiovascular death during 46 months of follow-up was unchanged by adjusting AVA, regardless of measure of body size (area under the receiver operating curve for AVA 0.72 (CI 0.58 to 0.87) versus, for example, AVA/BSA 0.75 (CI 0.61 to 0.88), p=0.22). Conclusions In the assessment of aortic stenosis, linear adjustment of AVA by BSA improves comparability between patients with diverging body size without, however, increasing the predictive accuracy for clinical events in a population with mild to moderate stenosis.
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3.
  • Bang, Casper N., et al. (författare)
  • Effect of lipid lowering on new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis : The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: American Heart Journal. - Elsevier. - 0002-8703. ; 163:4, s. 690-696
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). This effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Methods Asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS (n = 1,421) were randomized (1: 1) to double-blind simvastatin 40 mg and ezetimibe 10 mg combination or placebo and followed up for a mean of 4.3 years. The primary end point was the time to new-onset AF adjudicated by 12-lead electrocardiogram at a core laboratory reading center. Secondary outcomes were the correlates of new-onset AF with nonfatal nonhemorrhagic stroke and a combined end point of AS-related events. Results During the course of the study, new-onset AF was detected in 85 (6%) patients (14.2/1,000 person-years of follow-up). At baseline, patients who developed AF were, compared with those remaining in sinus rhythm, older and had a higher left ventricular mass index a smaller aortic valve area index. Treatment with simvastatin and ezetimibe was not associated with less new-onset AF (odds ratio 0.89 [95% CI 0.57-1.97], P = .717). In contrast, age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.07 [95% CI 1.05-1.10], P &lt; .001) and left ventricular mass index (HR 1.01 [95% CI 1.01-1.02], P &lt; .001) were independent predictors of new-onset AF. The occurrence of new-onset AF was independently associated with 2-fold higher risk of AS-related outcomes (HR 1.65 [95% CI 1.02-2.66], P = .04) and 4-fold higher risk of nonfatal nonhemorrhagic stroke (HR 4.04 [95% CI 1.18-13.82], P = .03). Conclusions Simvastatin and ezetimibe were not associated with less new-onset AF. Older age and greater left ventricular mass index were independent predictors of AF development. New-onset AF was associated with a worsening of prognosis. (Am Heart J 2012;163:690-6.)
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4.
  • Bang, Casper N., et al. (författare)
  • Renin-angiotensin system inhibition is not associated with increased sudden cardiac death, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality in patients with aortic stenosis
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cardiology. - 0167-5273. ; 175:3, s. 492-498
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Renin-angiotensin system inhibition (RASI) is frequently avoided in aortic stenosis (AS) patients because of fear of hypotension. We evaluated if RASI with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) increased mortality in patients with mild to moderate AS. Methods: All patients (n = 1873) from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study: asymptomatic patients with AS and preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction were included. Risks of sudden cardiac death (SCD), cardiovascular death and all-cause mortality according to RASI treatment were analyzed by multivariable time-varying Cox models and propensity score matched analyses. Results: 769 (41%) patients received RASI. During a median follow-up of 4.3 +/- 0.9 years, 678 patients were categorized as having severe AS, 545 underwent aortic valve replacement, 40 SCDs, 103 cardiovascular and 205 all-cause deaths occurred. RASI was not associated with SCD (HR: 1.19 [95% CI: 0.50-2.83], p = 0.694), cardiovascular (HR: 1.05 [95% CI: 0.62-1.77], p = 0.854) or all-cause mortality (HR: 0.81 [95% CI: 0.55-1.20], p = 0.281). This was confirmed in propensity matched analysis (all p &gt; 0.05). In separate analyses, RASI was associated with larger reduction in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.001) and less progression of LV mass (p = 0.040). Conclusions: RASI was not associated with SCD, cardiovascular or all-cause mortality in asymptomatic AS patients. However, RASI was associated with a potentially beneficial decrease in blood pressure and reduced LV mass progression. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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7.
  • Greve, Anders M., et al. (författare)
  • Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cardiology. - Elsevier. - 0167-5273. ; 166:1, s. 72-76
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. Methods: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS and preserved left ventricular (LV) systolic function, randomized to simvastatin/ezetimibe combination vs. placebo in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. At inclusion, AF was categorized as episodic or longstanding. Rhythm change was assessed on annual in-study electrocardiograms. Impact of AF on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality was determined by adjusting for biomarkers, clinical- and echocardiographic covariates. Results: Mean follow-up was 4.3 +/- 0.8 years (6,721 patient-years of follow-up). At baseline, episodic AF was present in 87 patients (5.6%), longstanding AF in 55 (3.5%) and no AF in 1,421 (90.9%). Incidence of new-onset AF was 1.2%/year; highest in those with impaired LV function. In multivariable analysis, longstanding AF was compared to no AF at baseline, associated with a 4.1-fold higher risk of heart failure (CI 1.2 to 13.8, p = 0.02) and a 4.8-fold higher risk of non-hemorrhagic stroke (CI 1.7 to 13.6, p = 0.003). Conclusion: Rate of AF is moderate in asymptomatic AS. Longstanding but not episodic AF was, independently predictive of increased risk of heart failure and non-hemorrhagic stroke. New-onset AF was associated with cardiac decompensation. (c) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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8.
  • Greve, Anders M., et al. (författare)
  • Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis : The SEAS study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cardiology. - 0167-5273. ; 180, s. 122-128
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. Methods: RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study of asymptomatic mild-to-moderate AS patients. Primary endpoint in this substudy was major cardiovascular events (MCEs) and secondary outcomes its individual components. Multivariable Cox-models using serially-measured RHR were used to examine the prognostic impact of RHR per se. Results: 1563 patients were followed for a mean of 4.3 years (6751 patient-years of follow-up), 553 (35%) MCEs occurred, 10% (n = 151) died, including 75 cardiovascular deaths. In multivariable analysis, baseline RHR was independently associated with MCEs (HR 1.1 per 10 min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.0-1.3) and cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.3 per 10 min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.0-1.7, both p &lt;= 0.03). Updating RHR with annual in-study reexaminations, time-varying RHR was highly associated with excess MCEs (HR 1.1 per 10 min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.1-1.3) and cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.4 per 10 min(-1) faster, 95% CI: 1.2-1.7, both p &lt;= 0.006). The association of RHR with MCEs and cardiovascular mortality was not dependent on atrial fibrillation status (both p &gt;= 0.06 for interaction). Conclusions: RHR is independently associated with MCEs and cardiovascular death in asymptomatic AS (Clinicaltrials.gov; unique identifier NCT00092677).
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9.
  • Greve, Anders M., et al. (författare)
  • Usefulness of the electrocardiogram in predicting cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic adults with aortic stenosis (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study)
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Cardiology. - Elsevier. - 0002-9149. ; 114:5, s. 751-756
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Hypertension and coronary heart disease are common in aortic stenosis (AS) and may impair prognosis for similar AS severity. Different changes in the electrocardiogram may be reflective of the separate impacts of AS, hypertension, and coronary heart disease, which could lead to enhanced risk stratification in AS. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if combining prognostically relevant electrocardiographic (ECG) findings improves prediction of cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic AS. All patients with baseline electrocardiograms in the SEAS study were included. The primary end point was cardiovascular death. Backward elimination (p &gt; 0.01) identified heart rate, Q waves, and Cornell voltage-duration product as independently associated with cardiovascular death. Multivariate logistic and Cox regression models were used to evaluate if these 3 ECG variables improved prediction of cardiovascular death. In 1,473 patients followed for a mean of 4.3 years (6,362 patient-years of follow-up), 70 cardiovascular deaths (5%) occurred. In multivariate analysis, heart rate (hazard ratio [FIR] 1.5 per 11.2 minute(-1) [1 SD], 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 1.8), sum of Q-wave amplitude (HR 1.3 per 2.0 nun [1 SD], 95% CI 1.1 to 1.6), and Cornell voltage-duration product (FIR 1.4 per 763 mm x ms [1 SD], 95% CI 1.2 to 1.7) remained independently associated with cardiovascular death. Combining the prognostic information contained in each of the 3 ECG variables improved integrated discrimination for prediction of cardiovascular death by 2.5%, net reclassification by 14.3%, and area under the curve by 0.06 (all p &lt;= 0.04) beyond other important risk factors. ECG findings add incremental predictive information for cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic patients with AS.
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10.
  • Jander, Nikolaus, et al. (författare)
  • Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Heart. - BMJ Publishing Group. - 1355-6037. ; 100:1, s. 28-33
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVA(index)). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are <1.0cm(2) for AVA and <0.6cm(2)/m(2) for AVA(index). Objective To investigate the influence of indexation on the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis and on the predictive accuracy regarding clinical outcome. Methods Echocardiographic and anthropometric data from a retrospective cohort of 2843 patients with aortic stenosis (jet velocity >2.5m/s) and from 1525 patients prospectively followed in the simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS) trial were analysed. Results The prevalence of severe stenosis increased with the AVA(index) criterion compared to AVA from 71% to 80% in the retrospective cohort, and from 29% to 44% in SEAS (both p<0.001). Overall, the predictive accuracy for aortic valve events was virtually identical for AVA and AVA(index) in the SEAS population (mean follow-up of 46months; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.70) vs 0.68 (CI 0.65 to 0.71) (NS). However, 213 patients additionally categorised as severe by AVA(index) experienced significantly less valve related events than those fulfilling only the AVA criterion (p<0.001). Conclusions Indexing AVA by BSA (AVA(index)) significantly increases the prevalence of patients with criteria for severe stenosis by including patients with a milder degree of the disease without improving the predictive accuracy for aortic valve related events.
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