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Sökning: WFRF:(O'Morain Colm)

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1.
  • Momozawa, Yukihide, et al. (författare)
  • Resequencing of positional candidates identifies low frequency IL23R coding variants protecting against inflammatory bowel disease
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - New York : Nature Publishing Group. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 43:1, s. 43-47
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified dozens of risk loci for many complex disorders, including Crohn's disease. However, common disease-associated SNPs explain at most ∼20% of the genetic variance for Crohn's disease. Several factors may account for this unexplained heritability, including rare risk variants not adequately tagged thus far in GWAS. That rare susceptibility variants indeed contribute to variation in multifactorial phenotypes has been demonstrated for colorectal cancer, plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, blood pressure, type 1 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and, in the case of Crohn's disease, for NOD2 (refs. 14,15). Here we describe the use of high-throughput resequencing of DNA pools to search for rare coding variants influencing susceptibility to Crohn's disease in 63 GWAS-identified positional candidate genes. We identify low frequency coding variants conferring protection against inflammatory bowel disease in IL23R, but we conclude that rare coding variants in positional candidates do not make a large contribution to inherited predisposition to Crohn's disease.
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2.
  • Soderman, Jan, et al. (författare)
  • Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the region of CLDN2-MORC4 in relation to inflammatory bowel disease
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: World Journal of Gastroenterology. - : BAISHIDENG PUBL GRP CO LTD. - 1007-9327 .- 2219-2840. ; 19:30, s. 4935-4943
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • AIM: To investigate a possible genetic influence of claudin (CLDN) 1, CLDN2 and CLDN4 in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease.METHODS: Allelic association between genetic regions of CLDN1, CLDN2 or CLDN4 and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis were investigated using both a case-control study approach (one case randomly selected from each of 191 Swedish inflammatory bowel disease families and 333 controls) and a family-based study (463 non-Swedish European inflammatory bowel disease-families). A nonsynonymous coding single nucleotide polymorphism in MORC4, located on the same linkage block as CLDN2, was investigated for association, as were two novel CLDN2 single nucleotide polymorphism markers, identified by resequencing.RESULTS: A single nucleotide polymorphism marker (rs12014762) located in the genetic region of CLDN2 was significantly associated to CD (case-control allelic OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.17-3.35, P = 0.007). MORC4 was present on the same linkage block as this CD marker. Using the case-control approach, a significant association (case control allelic OR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.08-2.41, P = 0.018) was found between CD and a nonsynonymous coding single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6622126) in MORC4. The association between the CLDN2 marker and CD was not replicated in the family-based study. Ulcerative colitis was not associated to any of the single nucleotide polymorphism markers.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that a variant of the CLDN2-MORC4 region predisposes to CD in a Swedish population.
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3.
  • Burisch, Johan, et al. (författare)
  • Costs and resource utilization for diagnosis and treatment during the initial year in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort : an ECCO-EpiCom Study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: ; 21:1, s. 121-131
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: No direct comparison of health care cost in patients with inflammatory bowel disease across the European continent exists. The aim of this study was to assess the costs of investigations and treatment for diagnostics and during the first year after diagnosis in Europe.METHODS: The EpiCom cohort is a prospective population-based inception cohort of unselected inflammatory bowel disease patients from 31 Western and Eastern European centers. Patients were followed every third month from diagnosis, and clinical data regarding treatment and investigations were collected. Costs were calculated in euros (&OV0556;) using the Danish Health Costs Register.RESULTS: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven patients were followed, 710 with ulcerative colitis, 509 with Crohn's disease, and 148 with inflammatory bowel disease unclassified. Total expenditure for the cohort was &OV0556;5,408,174 (investigations: &OV0556;2,042,990 [38%], surgery: &OV0556;1,427,648 [26%], biologicals: &OV0556;781,089 [14%], and standard treatment: &OV0556;1,156,520 [22%)]). Mean crude expenditure per patient in Western Europe (Eastern Europe) with Crohn's disease: investigations &OV0556;1803 (&OV0556;2160) (P = 0.44), surgery &OV0556;11,489 (&OV0556;13,973) (P = 0.14), standard treatment &OV0556;1027 (&OV0556;824) (P = 0.51), and biologicals &OV0556;7376 (&OV0556;8307) (P = 0.31). Mean crude expenditure per patient in Western Europe (Eastern Europe) with ulcerative colitis: investigations &OV0556;1189 (&OV0556;1518) (P < 0.01), surgery &OV0556;18,414 (&OV0556;12,395) (P = 0.18), standard treatment &OV0556;896 (&OV0556;798) (P < 0.05), and biologicals &OV0556;5681 (&OV0556;72) (P = 0.51).CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based unselected cohort, costs during the first year of disease were mainly incurred by investigative procedures and surgeries. However, biologicals accounted for >15% of costs. Long-term follow-up of the cohort is needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of biological agents.
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4.
  • Burisch, Johan, et al. (författare)
  • Initial Disease Course and Treatment in an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inception Cohort in Europe : The ECCO-EpiCom Cohort
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: ; 20:1, s. 36-46
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background:The EpiCom cohort is a prospective, population-based, inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients from 31 European centers covering a background population of 10.1 million. The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year outcome in the EpiCom cohort.Methods:Patients were followed-up every third month during the first 12 (3) months, and clinical data, demographics, disease activity, medical therapy, surgery, cancers, and deaths were collected and entered in a Web-based database (www.epicom-ecco.eu).Results:In total, 1367 patients were included in the 1-year follow-up. In western Europe, 65 Crohn's disease (CD) (16%), 20 ulcerative colitis (UC) (4%), and 4 IBD unclassified (4%) patients underwent surgery, and in eastern Europe, 12 CD (12%) and 2 UC (1%) patients underwent surgery. Eighty-one CD (20%), 80 UC (14%), and 13 (9%) IBD unclassified patients were hospitalized in western Europe compared with 17 CD (16%) and 12 UC (8%) patients in eastern Europe. The cumulative probability of receiving immunomodulators was 57% for CD in western (median time to treatment 2 months) and 44% (1 month) in eastern Europe, and 21% (5 months) and 5% (6 months) for biological therapy, respectively. For UC patients, the cumulative probability was 22% (4 months) and 15% (3 months) for immunomodulators and 6% (3 months) and 1% (12 months) for biological therapy, respectively in the western and eastern Europe.Discussion:In this cohort, immunological therapy was initiated within the first months of disease. Surgery and hospitalization rates did not differ between patients from eastern and western Europe, although more western European patients received biological agents and were comparable to previous population-based inception cohorts.
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5.
  • Burisch, Johan, et al. (författare)
  • Occurrence of anaemia in the first year of inflammatory bowel disease in a European population-based inception cohort : An ECCO-EpiCom study
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis. - : Oxford University Press. - 1873-9946 .- 1876-4479. ; 11:10, s. 1213-1222
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background and aims: Anaemia is an important complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anaemia and the practice of anaemia screening during the first year following diagnosis in a European prospective population-based inception cohort.Methods: Newly diagnosed IBD patients were included and followed prospectively for one year in 29 European and 1 Australian centre. Clinical data including demographics, medical therapy, surgery and blood samples were collected. Anaemia was defined according to the World Health Organization.Results: A total of 1,871 patients (CD: 686, 88%; UC: 1,021, 87%; IBDU 164. 81%) were included in the study. The prevalence of anaemia was higher in CD than in UC patients and overall, 49% of CD and 39% of UC patients had at least one instance of anaemia during the first 12 months after diagnosis. UC patients with more extensive disease and those from Eastern European countries, and CD patients with penetrating disease or colonic disease location, had higher risks of anaemia. CD and UC patients in need of none or only mild anti-inflammatory treatment had a lower risk of anaemia. In a significant proportion of patients, anaemia was not assessed until several months after diagnosis, and in almost half of all cases of anaemia a thorough work-up was not performed.Conclusions: Overall, 42% of patients had at least one instance of anaemia during the first year following diagnosis. Most patients were assessed for anaemia regularly; however, a full anaemia work-up was frequently neglected in this community setting.
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6.
  • Zammit, Stefania Chetcuti, et al. (författare)
  • Vitamin D deficiency in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort : an Epi-IBD study
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepathology. - : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. - 0954-691X .- 1473-5687. ; 30:11, s. 1297-1303
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Serum vitamin D level is commonly low in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although there is a growing body of evidence that links low vitamin D level to certain aspects of IBD such as disease activity and quality of life, data on its prevalence and how it varies across disease phenotype, smoking status and treatment groups are still missing.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with IBD between 2010 and 2011 were recruited. Demographic data and serum vitamin D levels were collected. Variance of vitamin D level was then assessed across different treatment groups, disease phenotype, disease activity and quality of life scores.RESULTS: A total of 238 (55.9% male) patients were included. Overall, 79% of the patients had either insufficient or deficient levels of vitamin D at diagnosis. Patients needing corticosteroid treatment at 1 year had significantly lower vitamin D levels at diagnosis (median 36.0 nmol/l) (P=0.035). Harvey-Bradshaw Index (P=0.0001) and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index scores (P=0.0001) were significantly lower in patients with higher vitamin D level. Serum vitamin D level correlated significantly with SIBQ score (P=0.0001) and with multiple components of SF12. Smokers at diagnosis had the lowest vitamin D levels (vitamin D: 34 nmol/l; P=0.053).CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the high prevalence of low vitamin D levels in treatment-naive European IBD populations. Furthermore, it demonstrates the presence of low vitamin D levels in patients with IBD who smoke.
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7.
  • Lind, Tore, et al. (författare)
  • Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Using One-week Triple Therapies Combining Omeprazole with Two Antimicrobials : The MACH I Study
  • 1996
  • Ingår i: Helicobacter. - 1083-4389 .- 1523-5378. ; 1:3, s. 138-144
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background.Eradication of Helicobacter pylori provides potential cure in the majority of patients with peptic ulcer disease, and eradication rates of more than 90% have been reported, using omeprazole in combination with two antimicrobials. The choice of antimicrobials, dose regimen and duration of treatment have varied between studies, however, and an optimal treatment still has to be established.Materials and Methods.We conducted an international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving more than 100 patients in each of six treatment groups in 43 hospital gastrointestinal units in Canada, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Patients (n=787) with proved duodenal ulcer disease were randomized to treatment twice daily for 1 week with omeprazole, 20 mg (O), plus either placebo (P) or combinations of two of the following anti-microbials: amoxicillin, 1 gm (A), clarithromycin, 250 or 500 mg (C250, C500), or metronidazole, 400 mg (M). Eradication of H. pylori was evaluated by 13C-UBT, performed before and 4 weeks after treatment cessation.Results.The eradication rates for the all-patients-treated analysis were 96%. OAC500; 95%, OMC250; 90%, OMC500; 84%, OAC250; 79%, OAM; and 1%, OP. OAC500 and OMC250 achieved eradication rates with lower 95% confidence interval limits exceeding 90%. All regimens were well-tolerated, 96% of patients complied with their dose regimen, and 2.3% of the patients discontinued treatment owing to adverse events.Conclusions.Omeprazole triple therapies given twice daily for 1 week produce high eradication rates, are well-tolerated, and are associated with high patient compliance. The two most effective therapies were those combining omeprazole, 20 mg, with either amoxicillin, 1 gm, plus clarithromycin, 500 mg, or metronidazole, 400 mg, plus clarithromycin, 250 mg, all given twice daily.
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8.
  • Lind, Tore, et al. (författare)
  • The MACH2 study : Role of omeprazole in eradication of Helicobacter pylori with 1-week triple therapies
  • 1999
  • Ingår i: Gastroenterology. - 0016-5085 .- 1528-0012. ; 116:2, s. 248-253
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background & Aims: The role of omeprazole in triple therapy and the impact of Helicobacter pylori resistance on treatment outcome are not established. This study investigated the role of omeprazole and influence of primary H. pylori resistance on eradication and development of secondary resistance.Methods: Patients (n = 539) with a history of duodenal ulcer and a positive H. pylori screening test result were randomized into 4 groups. OAC group received 20 mg omeprazole, 1000 mg amoxicillin, and 500 mg clarithromycin; OMC group received 20 mg omeprazole, 400 mg metronidazole, and 250 mg clarithromycin; and AC (amoxicillin, 1000 mg, and clarithromycin, 500 mg) and MC (metronidazole, 400 mg, and clarithromycin, 250 mg) groups received no omeprazole. All doses were administered twice daily for 1 week. H. pylori status was assessed before and after therapy by 13C-urea breath test. Susceptibility testing was performed at entry and in patients with persistent infection after therapy.Results: Eradication (intention to treat [n = 514]/per protocol [n = 449]) was 94%/95% for OAC, 26%/25% for AC (P < 0.001), 87%/91% for OMC, and 69%/72% for MC (P < 0.001). Primary resistance was 27% for metronidazole, 3% for clarithromycin, and 0% for amoxicillin. Eradication in primary metronidazole-susceptible/-resistant strains was 95%/76% for OMC and 86%/43% for MC. Secondary metronidazole and clarithromycin resistance each developed in 12 patients: 8 treated with omeprazole and 16 without omeprazole.Conclusions: Addition of omeprazole achieves high eradication rates, reduces the impact of primary resistance, and may decrease the risk of secondary resistance compared with regimens containing only two antibiotics.
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9.
  • Ng, Siew C., et al. (författare)
  • Geographical variability and environmental risk factors in inflammatory bowel disease
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Gut. - : BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. - 0017-5749 .- 1468-3288. ; 62:4, s. 630-649
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The changing epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) across time and geography suggests that environmental factors play a major role in modifying disease expression. Disease emergence in developing nations suggests that epidemiological evolution is related to westernisation of lifestyle and industrialisation. The strongest environmental associations identified are cigarette smoking and appendectomy, although neither alone explains the variation in incidence of IBD worldwide. Urbanisation of societies, associated with changes in diet, antibiotic use, hygiene status, microbial exposures and pollution have been implicated as potential environmental risk factors for IBD. Changes in socioeconomic status might occur differently in different geographical areas and populations and, consequently, it is important to consider the heterogeneity of risk factors applicable to the individual patient. Environmental risk factors of individual, familial, community-based, country-based and regionally based origin may all contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD. The geographical variation of IBD provides clues for researchers to investigate possible environmental aetiological factors. The present review aims to provide an update of the literature exploring geographical variability in IBD and to explore the environmental risk factors that may account for this variability.
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10.
  • Siegel, Corey A., et al. (författare)
  • Development of an index to define overall disease severity in IBD
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Gut. - London, United Kingdom : BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. - 0017-5749 .- 1468-3288. ; 67:2, s. 244-254
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background and aim: Disease activity for Crohn's disease (CD) and UC is typically defined based on symptoms at a moment in time, and ignores the long-term burden of disease. The aims of this study were to select the attributes determining overall disease severity, to rank the importance of and to score these individual attributes for both CD and UC.Methods: Using a modified Delphi panel, 14 members of the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD) selected the most important attributes related to IBD. Eighteen IOIBD members then completed a statistical exercise (conjoint analysis) to create a relative ranking of these attributes. Adjusted utilities were developed by creating proportions for each level within an attribute.Results: For CD, 15.8% of overall disease severity was attributed to the presence of mucosal lesions, 10.9% to history of a fistula, 9.7% to history of abscess and 7.4% to history of intestinal resection. For UC, 18.1% of overall disease severity was attributed to mucosal lesions, followed by 14.0% for impact on daily activities, 11.2% C reactive protein and 10.1% for prior experience with biologics. Overall disease severity indices were created on a 100-point scale by applying each attribute's average importance to the adjusted utilities.Conclusions: Based on specialist opinion, overall CD severity was associated more with intestinal damage, in contrast to overall UC disease severity, which was more dependent on symptoms and impact on daily life. Once validated, disease severity indices may provide a useful tool for consistent assessment of overall disease severity in patients with IBD.
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