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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Oei Edwin H. G.) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Oei Edwin H. G.)

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1.
  • Oei, Ling, et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide association study for radiographic vertebral fractures: A potential role for the 16q24 BMD locus
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Bone. - 8756-3282. ; 59, s. 20-27
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Vertebral fracture risk is a heritable complex trait. The aim of this study was to identify genetic susceptibility factors for osteoporotic vertebral fracture applying a genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach. The GWAS discovery was based on the Rotterdam Study, a population-based study of elderly Dutch individuals aged >55 years; and comprising 329 cases and 2666 controls with radiographic scoring (McCloskey-Kanis) and genetic data. Replication of one top-associated SNP was pursued by de-novo genotyping of 15 independent studies across Europe, the United States, and Australia and one Asian study. Radiographic vertebral fracture assessment was performed using McCloskey-Kanis or Genant semi-quantitative definitions. SNPs were analyzed in relation to vertebral fracture using logistic regression models corrected for age and sex. Fixed effects inverse variance and Han-Eskin alternative random effects meta-analyses were applied. Genome-wide significance was set at p<5 x 10(-8). In the discovery, a SNP (rs11645938) on chromosome 16q24 was associated with the risk for vertebral fractures at p = 4.6 x 10(-8). However, the association was not significant across 5720 cases and 21,791 controls from 14 studies. Fixed-effects meta-analysis summary estimate was 1.06 (95% Cl: 0.98-1.14; p = 0.17), displaying high degree of heterogeneity (I-2= 57%; Q(het)p = 0.0006). Under Han-Eskin alternative random effects model the summary effect was significant (p = 0.0005). The SNP maps to a region previously found associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS-BMD) in two large meta-analyses from the GEFOS consortium. A false positive association in the GWAS discovery cannot be excluded, yet, the low-powered setting of the discovery and replication settings (appropriate to identify risk effect size >1.25) may still be consistent with an effect size <1.10, more of the type expected in complex traits. Larger effort in studies with standardized phenotype definitions is needed to confirm or reject the involvement of this locus on the risk for vertebral fractures. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2.
  • Oei, Ling, et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide association study for radiographic vertebral fractures : A potential role for the 16q24 BMD locus
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Bone. - 8756-3282 .- 1873-2763. ; 59, s. 20-27
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Vertebral fracture risk is a heritable complex trait. The aim of this study was to identify genetic susceptibility factors for osteoporotic vertebral fracture applying a genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach. The GWAS discovery was based on the Rotterdam Study, a population-based study of elderly Dutch individuals aged &gt;55 years; and comprising 329 cases and 2666 controls with radiographic scoring (McCloskey-Kanis) and genetic data. Replication of one top-associated SNP was pursued by de-novo genotyping of 15 independent studies across Europe, the United States, and Australia and one Asian study. Radiographic vertebral fracture assessment was performed using McCloskey-Kanis or Genant semi-quantitative definitions. SNPs were analyzed in relation to vertebral fracture using logistic regression models corrected for age and sex. Fixed effects inverse variance and Han-Eskin alternative random effects meta-analyses were applied. Genome-wide significance was set at p&lt;5 x 10(-8). In the discovery, a SNP (rs11645938) on chromosome 16q24 was associated with the risk for vertebral fractures at p = 4.6 x 10(-8). However, the association was not significant across 5720 cases and 21,791 controls from 14 studies. Fixed-effects meta-analysis summary estimate was 1.06 (95% Cl: 0.98-1.14; p = 0.17), displaying high degree of heterogeneity (I-2= 57%; Q(het)p = 0.0006). Under Han-Eskin alternative random effects model the summary effect was significant (p = 0.0005). The SNP maps to a region previously found associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS-BMD) in two large meta-analyses from the GEFOS consortium. A false positive association in the GWAS discovery cannot be excluded, yet, the low-powered setting of the discovery and replication settings (appropriate to identify risk effect size &gt;1.25) may still be consistent with an effect size &lt;1.10, more of the type expected in complex traits. Larger effort in studies with standardized phenotype definitions is needed to confirm or reject the involvement of this locus on the risk for vertebral fractures.</p>
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3.
  • Rio, Ebonie Kendra, et al. (författare)
  • ICON PART-T 2019-International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium Consensus : recommended standards for reporting participant characteristics in tendinopathy research (PART-T)
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Sports Medicine. - BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. - 0306-3674 .- 1473-0480. ; 54:11, s. 627-630
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>We aimed to establish consensus for reporting recommendations relating to participant characteristics in tendon research. A scoping literature review of tendinopathy studies (Achilles, patellar, hamstring, gluteal and elbow) was followed by an online survey and face-to-face consensus meeting with expert healthcare professionals (HCPs) at the International Scientific Tendon Symposium, Groningen 2018. We reviewed 263 papers to form statements for consensus and invited 30 HCPs from different disciplines and geographical locations; 28 completed the survey and 15 attended the meeting. There was consensus that the following data should be reported for cases and controls: sex, age, standing height, body mass, history of tendinopathy, whether imaging was used to confirm pathology, loading tests, pain location, symptom duration and severity, level of disability, comorbidities, physical activity level, recruitment source and strategies, and medication use history. Standardised reporting of participant characteristics aims to benefit patients and clinicians by guiding researchers in the conduct of their studies. We provide free resources to facilitate researchers adopting our recommendations.</p>
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4.
  • Sudol-Szopinska, Iwona, et al. (författare)
  • Recommendations of the ESSR Arthritis Subcommittee for the Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Musculoskeletal Rheumatic Diseases
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Seminars in Musculoskeletal Radiology. - 1089-7860 .- 1098-898X. ; 19:4, s. 396-411
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>This article presents the recommendations of the European Society of Muscloskeletal Radiology Arthritis Subcommittee regarding the standards of the use of MRI in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases. The recommendations discuss (1) the role of MRI in current classification criteria of musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases (including early diagnosis of inflammation, disease follow-up, and identification of disease complications); (2) the impact of MRI on the diagnosis of axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile spondyloarthritis; (3) MRI protocols for the axial and peripheral joints; (4) MRI interpretation and reporting for axial and peripheral joints; and finally, (5) methods for assessing MR images including quantitative, semiquantitative, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI studies.</p>
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5.
  • Vicenzino, Bill, et al. (författare)
  • ICON 2019-International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium Consensus : There are nine core health-related domains for tendinopathy (CORE DOMAINS): Delphi study of healthcare professionals and patients
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Sports Medicine. - BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP. - 0306-3674 .- 1473-0480. ; 54:8, s. 444-451
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background</p><p>The absence of any agreed-upon tendon health-related domains hampers advances in clinical tendinopathy research. This void means that researchers report a very wide range of outcome measures inconsistently. As a result, substantial synthesis/meta-analysis of tendon research findings is almost futile despite researchers publishing busily. We aimed to determine options for, and then define, core health-related domains for tendinopathy.</p><p>Methods</p><p>We conducted a Delphi study of healthcare professionals (HCP) and patients in a three-stage process. In stage 1, we extracted candidate domains from clinical trial reports and developed an online survey. Survey items took the form: 'The 'candidate domain' is important enough to be included as a core health-related domain of tendinopathy'; response options were: agree, disagree, or unsure. In stage 2, we administered the online survey and reported the findings. Stage 3 consisted of discussions of the findings of the survey at the ICON (International Scientific Tendinopathy Symposium Consensus) meeting. We set 70% participant agreement as the level required for a domain to be considered 'core'; similarly, 70% agreement was required for a domain to be relegated to 'not core' (see Results next).</p><p>Results</p><p>Twenty-eight HCP (92% of whom had &gt;10 years of tendinopathy experience, 71% consulted &gt;10 cases per month) and 32 patients completed the online survey. Fifteen HCP and two patients attended the consensus meeting. Of an original set of 24 candidate domains, the ICON group deemed nine domains to be core. These were: (1) patient rating of condition, (2) participation in life activities (day to day, work, sport), (3) pain on activity/loading, (4) function, (5) psychological factors, (6) physical function capacity, (7) disability, (8) quality of life and (9) pain over a specified time. Two of these (2, 6) were an amalgamation of five candidate domains. We agreed that seven other candidate domains were not core domains: range of motion, pain on clinician applied test, clinical examination, palpation, drop out, sensory modality pain and pain without other specification. We were undecided on the other five candidate domains of physical activity, structure, medication use, adverse effects and economic impact.</p><p>Conclusion</p><p>Nine core domains for tendon research should guide reporting of outcomes in clinical trials. Further research should determine the best outcome measures for each specific tendinopathy (ie, core outcome sets).</p>
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