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Sökning: WFRF:(Ordovas Jose)

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1.
  • Kanoni, Stavroula, et al. (författare)
  • Total Zinc Intake May Modify the Glucose-Raising Effect of a Zinc Transporter (SLC30A8) Variant A 14-Cohort Meta-analysis
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Diabetes. - American Diabetes Association Inc.. - 1939-327X. ; 60:9, s. 2407-2416
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE-Many genetic variants have been associated with glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes in genome-wide association studies. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is important for beta-cell function and glucose homeostasis. We tested the hypothesis that zinc intake could influence the glucose-raising effect of specific variants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We conducted a 14-cohort meta-analysis to assess the interaction of 20 genetic variants known to be related to glycemic traits and zinc metabolism with dietary zinc intake (food sources) and a 5-cohort meta-analysis to assess the interaction with total zinc intake (food sources and supplements) on fasting glucose levels among individuals of European ancestry without diabetes. RESULTS-We observed a significant association of total zinc intake with lower fasting glucose levels (beta-coefficient +/- SE per 1 mg/day of zinc intake: -0.0012 +/- 0.0003 mmol/L, summary P value = 0.0003), while the association of dietary zinc intake was not significant. We identified a nominally significant interaction between total zinc intake and the SLC30A8 rs11558471 variant on fasting glucose levels (beta-coefficient +/- SE per A allele for 1 mg/day of greater total zinc intake: -0.0017 +/- 0.0006 mmol/L, summary interaction P value = 0.005); this result suggests a stronger inverse association between total zinc intake and fasting glucose in individuals carrying the glucose-raising A allele compared with individuals who do not carry it. None of the other interaction tests were statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that higher total zinc intake may attenuate the glucose-raising effect of the rs11558471 SLC30A8 (zinc transporter) variant. Our findings also support evidence for the association of higher total zinc intake with lower fasting glucose levels. Diabetes 60:2407-2416, 2011
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2.
  • Delgado-Lista, Javier, et al. (författare)
  • Top Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Affecting Carbohydrate Metabolism in Metabolic Syndrome : From the LIPGENE Study
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. - 0021-972X .- 1945-7197. ; 99:2, s. E384-E389
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Rationale: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a high-prevalence condition characterized by altered energy metabolism, insulin resistance, and elevated cardiovascular risk. Objectives: Although many individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been linked to certain MetS features, there are few studies analyzing the influence of SNPs on carbohydrate metabolism in MetS. Methods: A total of 904 SNPs (tag SNPs and functional SNPs) were tested for influence on 8 fasting and dynamic markers of carbohydrate metabolism, by performance of an intravenous glucose tolerance test in 450 participants in the LIPGENE study. Findings: From 382 initial gene-phenotype associations between SNPs and any phenotypic variables, 61 (16% of the preselected variables) remained significant after bootstrapping. Top SNPs affecting glucose metabolism variables were as follows: fasting glucose, rs26125 (PPARGC1B); fasting insulin, rs4759277 (LRP1); C-peptide, rs4759277 (LRP1); homeostasis assessment of insulin resistance, rs4759277 (LRP1); quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, rs184003 (AGER); sensitivity index, rs7301876 (ABCC9), acute insulin response to glucose, rs290481 (TCF7L2); and disposition index, rs12691 (CEBPA). Conclusions: We describe here the top SNPs linked to phenotypic features in carbohydrate metabolism among approximately 1000 candidate gene variations in fasting and postprandial samples of 450 patients with MetS from the LIPGENE study.</p>
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3.
  • Ding, Ming, et al. (författare)
  • Dairy consumption, systolic blood pressure, and risk of hypertension Mendelian randomization study
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: BMJ. British Medical Journal. - BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. - 1756-1833. ; 356
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>OBJECTIVE To examine whether previous observed inverse associations of dairy intake with systolic blood pressure and risk of hypertension were causal. DESIGN Mendelian randomization study using the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4988235 related to lactase persistence as an instrumental variable. SETTING CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) Consortium. PARTICIPANTS Data from 22 studies with 171 213 participants, and an additional 10 published prospective studies with 26 119 participants included in the observational analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The instrumental variable estimation was conducted using the ratio of coefficients approach. Using metaanalysis, an additional eight published randomized clinical trials on the association of dairy consumption with systolic blood pressure were summarized. RESULTS Compared with the CC genotype (CC is associated with complete lactase deficiency), the CT/TT genotype (TT is associated with lactose persistence, and CT is associated with certain lactase deficiency) of LCT-13910 (lactase persistence gene) rs4988235 was associated with higher dairy consumption (0.23 (about 55 g/day), 95% confidence interval 0.17 to 0.29) serving/day; P&lt;0.001) and was not associated with systolic blood pressure (0.31, 95% confidence interval -0.05 to 0.68 mm Hg; P=0.09) or risk of hypertension (odds ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.97 to 1.05; P=0.27). Using LCT-13910 rs4988235 as the instrumental variable, genetically determined dairy consumption was not associated with systolic blood pressure (beta=1.35, 95% confidence interval -0.28 to 2.97 mm Hg for each serving/day) or risk of hypertension (odds ratio 1.04, 0.88 to 1.24). Moreover, meta-analysis of the published clinical trials showed that higher dairy intake has no significant effect on change in systolic blood pressure for interventions over one month to 12 months (intervention compared with control groups: beta=-0.21, 95% confidence interval -0.98 to 0.57 mm Hg). In observational analysis, each serving/day increase in dairy consumption was associated with -0.11 (95% confidence interval -0.20 to -0.02 mm Hg; P=0.02) lower systolic blood pressure but not risk of hypertension (odds ratio 0.98, 0.97 to 1.00; P=0.11). CONCLUSION The weak inverse association between dairy intake and systolic blood pressure in observational studies was not supported by a comprehensive instrumental variable analysis and systematic review of existing clinical trials.</p>
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4.
  • Ferguson, Lynnette R., et al. (författare)
  • Guide and Position of the International Society of Nutrigenetics/Nutrigenomics on Personalised Nutrition : Part 1 - Fields of Precision Nutrition
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics. - S. Karger AG. - 1661-6499. ; 9:1, s. 12-27
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Diversity in the genetic profile between individuals and specific ethnic groups affects nutrient requirements, metabolism and response to nutritional and dietary interventions. Indeed, individuals respond differently to lifestyle interventions (diet, physical activity, smoking, etc.). The sequencing of the human genome and subsequent increased knowledge regarding human genetic variation is contributing to the emergence of personalized nutrition. These advances in genetic science are raising numerous questions regarding the mode that precision nutrition can contribute solutions to emerging problems in public health, by reducing the risk and prevalence of nutrition-related diseases. Current views on personalized nutrition encompass omics technologies (nutrigenomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, foodomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, etc.), functional food development and challenges related to legal and ethical aspects, application in clinical practice, and population scope, in terms of guidelines and epidemiological factors. In this context, precision nutrition can be considered as occurring at three levels: (1) conventional nutrition based on general guidelines for population groups by age, gender and social determinants; (2) individualized nutrition that adds phenotypic information about the person's current nutritional status (e.g. anthropometry, biochemical and metabolic analysis, physical activity, among others), and (3) genotype-directed nutrition based on rare or common gene variation. Research and appropriate translation into medical practice and dietary recommendations must be based on a solid foundation of knowledge derived from studies on nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics. A scientific society, such as the International Society of Nutrigenetics/Nutrigenomics (ISNN), internationally devoted to the study of nutrigenetics/nutrigenomics, can indeed serve the commendable roles of (1) promoting science and favoring scientific communication and (2) permanently working as a 'clearing house' to prevent disqualifying logical jumps, correct or stop unwarranted claims, and prevent the creation of unwarranted expectations in patients and in the general public. In this statement, we are focusing on the scientific aspects of disciplines covering nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics issues. Genetic screening and the ethical, legal, social and economic aspects will be dealt with in subsequent statements of the Society.
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5.
  • Huang, Tao, et al. (författare)
  • Dairy Consumption and Body Mass Index Among Adults : Mendelian Randomization Analysis of 184802 Individuals from 25 Studies
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Clinical Chemistry. - 0009-9147 .- 1530-8561. ; 64:1, s. 183-191
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>BACKGROUND:</strong> Associations between dairy intake and body mass index (BMI) have been inconsistently observed in epidemiological studies, and the causal relationship remains ill defined.</p><p><strong>METHODS:</strong> We performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis using an established dairy intake-associated genetic polymorphism located upstream of the lactase gene (<em>LCT</em>-13910 C/T, rs4988235) as an instrumental variable (IV). Linear regression models were fitted to analyze associations between (<em>a</em>) dairy intake and BMI, (<em>b</em>) rs4988235 and dairy intake, and (<em>c</em>) rs4988235 and BMI in each study. The causal effect of dairy intake on BMI was quantified by IV estimators among 184802 participants from 25 studies.</p><p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> Higher dairy intake was associated with higher BMI (β = 0.03 kg/m2 per serving/day; 95% CI, 0.00–0.06; <em>P</em> = 0.04), whereas the <em>LCT</em> genotype with 1 or 2 T allele was significantly associated with 0.20 (95% CI, 0.14–0.25) serving/day higher dairy intake (<em>P</em> = 3.15 × 10−12) and 0.12 (95% CI, 0.06–0.17) kg/m2 higher BMI (<em>P</em> = 2.11 × 10−5). MR analysis showed that the genetically determined higher dairy intake was significantly associated with higher BMI (β = 0.60 kg/m2 per serving/day; 95% CI, 0.27–0.92; <em>P</em> = 3.0 × 10−4).</p><p><strong>CONCLUSIONS:</strong> The present study provides strong evidence to support a causal effect of higher dairy intake on increased BMI among adults.</p>
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6.
  • Kanoni, Stavroula, et al. (författare)
  • Total zinc intake may modify the glucose-raising effect of a zinc transporter (SLC30A8) variant : a 14-cohort meta-analysis
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Diabetes. - 0012-1797 .- 1939-327X. ; 60:9, s. 2407-2416
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>OBJECTIVE</strong></p> <p>Many genetic variants have been associated with glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes in genome-wide association studies. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is important for beta-cell function and glucose homeostasis. We tested the hypothesis that zinc intake could influence the glucose-raising effect of specific variants.</p> <p><strong>RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS</strong></p> <p>We conducted a 14-cohort meta-analysis to assess the interaction of 20 genetic variants known to be related to glycemic traits and zinc metabolism with dietary zinc intake (food sources) and a 5-cohort meta-analysis to assess the interaction with total zinc intake (food sources and supplements) on fasting glucose levels among individuals of European ancestry without diabetes.</p> <p><strong>RESULTS</strong></p> <p>We observed a significant association of total zinc intake with lower fasting glucose levels (beta-coefficient +/- SE per 1 mg/day of zinc intake: -0.0012 +/- 0.0003 mmol/L, summary P value = 0.0003), while the association of dietary zinc intake was not significant. We identified a nominally significant interaction between total zinc intake and the SLC30A8 rs11558471 variant on fasting glucose levels (beta-coefficient +/- SE per A allele for 1 mg/day of greater total zinc intake: -0.0017 +/- 0.0006 mmol/L, summary interaction P value = 0.005); this result suggests a stronger inverse association between total zinc intake and fasting glucose in individuals carrying the glucose-raising A allele compared with individuals who do not carry it. None of the other interaction tests were statistically significant.</p> <p><strong>CONCLUSIONS </strong></p> <p>Our results suggest that higher total zinc intake may attenuate the glucose-raising effect of the rs11558471 SLC30A8 (zinc transporter) variant. Our findings also support evidence for the association of higher total zinc intake with lower fasting glucose levels.</p>
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7.
  • Kanoni, Stavroula, et al. (författare)
  • Total zinc intake may modify the glucose-raising effect of a zinc transporter (SLC30A8) variant : a 14-cohort meta-analysis
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Diabetes. - Alexandria : American diabetes association. - 0012-1797 .- 1939-327X. ; 60:9, s. 2407-2416
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>OBJECTIVE</strong> Many genetic variants have been associated with glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes in genome-wide association studies. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is important for β-cell function and glucose homeostasis. We tested the hypothesis that zinc intake could influence the glucose-raising effect of specific variants.</p><p><strong>RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS</strong> We conducted a 14-cohort meta-analysis to assess the interaction of 20 genetic variants known to be related to glycemic traits and zinc metabolism with dietary zinc intake (food sources) and a 5-cohort meta-analysis to assess the interaction with total zinc intake (food sources and supplements) on fasting glucose levels among individuals of European ancestry without diabetes.</p><p><strong>RESULTS</strong> We observed a significant association of total zinc intake with lower fasting glucose levels (β-coefficient ± SE per 1 mg/day of zinc intake: -0.0012 ± 0.0003 mmol/L, summary P value = 0.0003), while the association of dietary zinc intake was not significant. We identified a nominally significant interaction between total zinc intake and the SLC30A8 rs11558471 variant on fasting glucose levels (β-coefficient ± SE per A allele for 1 mg/day of greater total zinc intake: -0.0017 ± 0.0006 mmol/L, summary interaction P value = 0.005); this result suggests a stronger inverse association between total zinc intake and fasting glucose in individuals carrying the glucose-raising A allele compared with individuals who do not carry it. None of the other interaction tests were statistically significant.</p><p><strong>CONCLUSIONS</strong> Our results suggest that higher total zinc intake may attenuate the glucose-raising effect of the rs11558471 SLC30A8 (zinc transporter) variant. Our findings also support evidence for the association of higher total zinc intake with lower fasting glucose levels.</p>
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8.
  • Nettleton, Jennifer A, et al. (författare)
  • Interactions of dietary whole-grain intake with fasting glucose- and insulin-related genetic loci in individuals of European descent : a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Diabetes Care. - 0149-5992 .- 1935-5548. ; 33:12, s. 2684-2691
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>OBJECTIVE:</strong></p> <p>Whole-grain foods are touted for multiple health benefits, including enhancing insulin sensitivity and reducing type 2 diabetes risk. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in individuals free of diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that whole-grain food intake and genetic variation interact to influence concentrations of fasting glucose and insulin.</p> <p><strong>RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:</strong></p> <p>Via meta-analysis of data from 14 cohorts comprising ∼ 48,000 participants of European descent, we studied interactions of whole-grain intake with loci previously associated in GWAS with fasting glucose (16 loci) and/or insulin (2 loci) concentrations. For tests of interaction, we considered a P value &lt;0.0028 (0.05 of 18 tests) as statistically significant.</p> <p><strong>RESULTS:</strong></p> <p>Greater whole-grain food intake was associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin concentrations independent of demographics, other dietary and lifestyle factors, and BMI (β [95% CI] per 1-serving-greater whole-grain intake: -0.009 mmol/l glucose [-0.013 to -0.005], P &lt; 0.0001 and -0.011 pmol/l [ln] insulin [-0.015 to -0.007], P = 0.0003). No interactions met our multiple testing-adjusted statistical significance threshold. The strongest SNP interaction with whole-grain intake was rs780094 (GCKR) for fasting insulin (P = 0.006), where greater whole-grain intake was associated with a smaller reduction in fasting insulin concentrations in those with the insulin-raising allele.</p> <p><strong>CONCLUSIONS:</strong></p> <p>Our results support the favorable association of whole-grain intake with fasting glucose and insulin and suggest a potential interaction between variation in GCKR and whole-grain intake in influencing fasting insulin concentrations.</p>
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9.
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10.
  • Perez-Martinez, Pablo, et al. (författare)
  • Association between glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) and apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene polymorphisms and triacylglycerol concentrations in fasting, postprandial, and fenofibrate-treated states
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. - American Society for Clinical Nutrition. - 1938-3207. ; 89:1, s. 391-399
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Variation in the apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) and glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) genes has been associated with fasting plasma triacylglycerol. Objective: We investigated the combined effects of the GCKR rs780094C -> T, APOA5 -1131T -> C, and APOA5 56C -> G single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on fasting triacylglycerol in several independent populations and the response to a high-fat meal and fenofibrate interventions. Design: We used a cross-sectional design to investigate the association with fasting triacylglycerol in 8 populations from America, Asia, and Europe (n = 7730 men and women) and 2 intervention studies in US whites (n = `1061) to examine postprandial triacylglycerol after a high-fat meal and the response to fenofibrate. We defined 3 combined genotype groups: 1) protective (homozygous for the wild-type allele for all 3 SNPs); 2) intermediate (any mixed genotype not included in groups 1 and 3); and 3) risk (carriers of the variant alleles at both genes). Results: Subjects within the risk group had significantly higher fasting triacylglycerol and a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia than did subjects in the protective group across all populations. Moreover, subjects in the risk group had a greater postprandial triacylglycerol response to a high-fat meal and greater fenofibrate-induced reduction of fasting triacylglycerol than did the other groups, especially among persons with hypertriglyceridemia. Subjects with the intermediate genotype had intermediate values (P for trend < 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs in GCKR and APOA5 have an additive effect on both fasting and postprandial triacylglycerol and contribute to the interindividual variability in response to fenofibrate treatment. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;89:391-9. Clin Nutr 2009; 89: 391-9.
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