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Sökning: WFRF:(Ortsater G)

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1.
  • Banefelt, J., et al. (författare)
  • Risk of imminent fracture following a previous fracture in a Swedish database study
  • Ingår i: Osteoporosis International. - : Springer. - 0937-941X .- 1433-2965. ; 30:3, s. 601-609
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Summary: This study examined the imminent risk of a future fracture within 1 and 2 years following a first fracture in women aged 50 years and older and assessed independent factors associated with risk of subsequent fractures. The study highlights the need to intervene rapidly after a fracture to prevent further fractures. Introduction: This study aims to determine the imminent risk of subsequent fractures within 1 and 2 years following a first fracture and to assess independent factors associated with subsequent fractures. Methods: Retrospective, observational cohort study of women aged ≥ 50 years with a fragility fracture was identified from Swedish national registers. Clinical/demographic characteristics at the time of index fracture and cumulative fracture incidences up to 12 and 24 months following index fracture were calculated. Risk factors for subsequent fracture were identified using multivariate regression analysis. Results: Two hundred forty-two thousand one hundred eight women (mean [SD] age 74 [12.5] years) were included. The cumulative subsequent fracture incidence at 12 months was 7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9–7.2) and at 24 months was 12.0% (95% CI, 11.8–12.1). The rate of subsequent fractures was highest in the first month (~ 15 fractures per 1000 patient-years) and remained steady between 4 and 24 months (~ 5 fractures/1000 patient-years). Higher age was an independent risk factor for imminent subsequent fractures (at 24 months, sub-distribution hazard ratio [HR], 3.07; p < 0.001 for women 80–89 years [reference 50–59 years]). Index vertebral fracture was a strong independent risk factor for subsequent fracture (sub-distribution HR, 2.72 versus hip fracture; p < 0.001 over 12 months; HR, 2.23; p < 0.001 over 24 months). Conclusions: Our findings highlight the need to intervene rapidly after any fragility fracture in postmenopausal women. The occurrence of a fragility fracture provides healthcare systems with a unique opportunity to intervene to reduce the increased risk of subsequent fractures.
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  • Ström, O., et al. (författare)
  • Real-world effectiveness of osteoporosis treatment in the oldest old
  • Ingår i: Osteoporosis International. - : Springer. - 0937-941X .- 1433-2965. ; 31:8, s. 1525-1533
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Summary: We studied effectiveness of osteoporosis treatment in women older than 80 years, who often are not included in clinical trials. Treatments were as effective on bone density and fractures as in younger women. Introduction: To study real-world effectiveness of osteoporosis treatment on BMD and fractures in the oldest old women (≥ 80 years) compared with women (60–79 years) in the clinical setting using Swedish health register data. Methods: National registers and data from DXA machines were used to study effectiveness of all available osteoporosis treatments in women 60–79 and ≥ 80 years using three approaches: (1) Total Hip BMD change up to 8 years after treatment start; (2) fracture incidence where patients served as their own controls, comparing the first 3 months after treatment start with the subsequent 12 months; and (3) comparison of fracture incidence post-fracture in women ≥ 80 years treated with osteoporosis treatment or calcium/vitamin D. Results: Analysis 1: Total Hip BMD increased by up to 6.7% and 7.7% in women 60–79 and ≥ 80 years old, respectively. The mean increase in BMD was 1.1%-units per year in both age groups. Analysis 2: Relative to the 3-month baseline, fracture incidence decreased during the subsequent 12 months of treatment. Incidence rate ratios were estimated at 0.65, 0.74, 0.29, and 0.81 for any, hip, vertebral, and non-hip-non-vertebral fracture, respectively. Analysis 3: A 24-month incidence of any fracture in women ≥ 80 years given post-fracture osteoporosis treatment was lower (HR = 0.78) than in women given calcium/vitamin D, but treatment allocation was not random, with lower mortality (HR = 0.51) in patients receiving OP treatment. Conclusions: Osteoporosis medication in women > 80 years in clinical practice likely works, and the magnitude of effect is similar to what was estimated in younger women. The choice between osteoporosis treatment and calcium/vitamin D after fracture in women ≥ 80 years is not random but appears associated with the patient’s health status and presence of vertebral fractures, rather than the known risk profile of sustaining a fracture at a high age.
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  • Lauppe, Rosa, et al. (författare)
  • Differing impact of clinical factors on the risk of fracture in younger and older women in the general population and an osteoporosis clinic population
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Archives of Osteoporosis. - : Springer. - 1862-3522 .- 1862-3514. ; 14:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Summary: This study assesses the impact of risk factors for fracture in women aged 80+ and 60–79. The results suggest that risk assessment which fits younger women may not be suited for the 80+ strata as many common risk factors are less predictive in the older compared to the younger cohort. Purpose: This study assesses whether the impact of classical risk factors for fracture due to osteoporosis is different in women aged 80+ and women aged 60–79. Since most prior research on the contribution of risk factors is based on patients below 80 years of age, this study aims to fill this knowledge gap to increase the accuracy of risk assessment in the oldest old. Methods: Retrospective, observational cohort study using Swedish national health register data and BMD data from osteoporosis clinics. Women aged at least 60 were identified from a random sample of the general population and from the BMD databases and allocated to two populations representing patients at different stages of risk assessment. The relative impact of risk factors on fracture risk was assessed using multivariate competing risk regression with fracture as outcome and death as competing event. Results: A total of 163,329 women were included from the general population (52,499 aged 80+) and 22,378 from the BMD databases (4563 aged 80+). The clinical risk factors with relatively highest effect on fracture risk in the older patients were prior fracture and hip T-score below − 2.5 SD. Other included risk factors showed lower impact in the older compared to the younger strata. Conclusions: This study confirms our understanding of the key risk factors for fracture: age, prior fracture, and a low T-score. Regarding remaining risk factors, risk assessment which fits younger women may not be suited for the 80+ strata as many common risk factors are less predictive in the older compared to the younger cohort.
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  • Borgström, Fredrik, et al. (författare)
  • Fragility fractures in Europe: burden, management and opportunities.
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Archives of osteoporosis. - 1862-3514. ; 15:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • This report provides an overview and a comparison of the burden and management of fragility fractures in the largest five countries of the European Union plus Sweden (EU6). In 2017, new fragility fractures in the EU6 are estimated at 2.7 million with an associated annual cost of €37.5 billion and a loss of 1.0 million quality-adjusted life years.Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone mass and strength, which increases the risk of fragility fractures, which in turn, represent the main consequence of the disease. This report provides an overview and a comparison of the burden and management of fragility fractures in the largest five EU countries and Sweden (designated the EU6).A series of metrics describing the burden and management of fragility fractures were defined by a scientific steering committee. A working group performed the data collection and analysis. Data were collected from current literature, available retrospective data and public sources. Different methods were applied (e.g. standard statistics and health economic modelling), where appropriate, to perform the analysis for each metric.Total fragility fractures in the EU6 are estimated to increase from 2.7 million in 2017 to 3.3 million in 2030; a 23% increase. The resulting annual fracture-related costs (€37.5 billion in 2017) are expected to increase by 27%. An estimated 1.0 million quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were lost in 2017 due to fragility fractures. The current disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) per 1000 individuals age 50 years or more were estimated at 21 years, which is higher than the estimates for stroke or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The treatment gap (percentage of eligible individuals not receiving treatment with osteoporosis drugs) in the EU6 is estimated to be 73% for women and 63% for men; an increase of 17% since 2010. If all patients who fracture in the EU6 were enrolled into fracture liaison services, at least 19,000 fractures every year might be avoided.Fracture-related burden is expected to increase over the coming decades. Given the substantial treatment gap and proven cost-effectiveness of fracture prevention schemes such as fracture liaison services, urgent action is needed to ensure that all individuals at high risk of fragility fracture are appropriately assessed and treated.
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  • Hult, Malin, et al. (författare)
  • Short-term glucocorticoid treatment increases insulin secretion in islets derived from lean mice through multiple pathways and mechanisms
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. - 0303-7207 .- 1872-8057. ; 301:1-2, s. 109-116
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids leads to metabolic dysfunctions with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Long-term treatment with glucocorticoids induces severe impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. We analyzed the effects of short-, and medium-term (2-120h) treatment with 50-200nM glucocorticoids on primary pancreatic islet cultures derived from lean C57BL/6J mice. In contrast to animal models of insulin resistance, beta-cells from lean mice respond with an increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, with a peak effect around 18-24h of treatment. Analyses of the insulin secretion response reveal that early and late phase responses are dissociated upon glucocorticoid treatment. Whereas late phase responses return to basal levels after long treatment, early phase responses remain increased over several days. Increased insulin secretion is also obtained by incubation with the inactive glucocorticoid dehydrocorticosterone, pointing to an important role of the enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in mediating glucocorticoid effects in beta-cells. Transcript profiling revealed differential regulation of genes involved in mediation of signal transduction, insulin secretion, stress and inflammatory responses. The results show that short- to medium-term glucocorticoid treatment of pancreatic islets derived from lean mice leads to an increased insulin release and may constitute an important parameter in changing towards a pro-diabetic phenotype.
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