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Sökning: WFRF:(Pajak Andrzej)

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1.
  • De Bacquer, Dirk, et al. (författare)
  • Incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with stabilized coronary heart disease : the EUROASPIRE IV follow-up study
  • ????
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Epidemiology. - Springer. - 0393-2990.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The EUROASPIRE surveys (EUROpean Action on Secondary Prevention through Intervention to Reduce Events) demonstrated that most European coronary patients fail to achieve lifestyle, risk factor and therapeutic targets. Here we report on the 2-year incidence of hard cardiovascular (CV) endpoints in the EUROASPIRE IV cohort. EUROASPIRE IV (2012–2013) was a large cross-sectional study undertaken at 78 centres from selected geographical areas in 24 European countries. Patients were interviewed and examined at least 6 months following hospitalization for a coronary event or procedure. Fatal and non-fatal CV events occurring at least 1 year after this baseline screening were registered. The primary outcome in our analyses was the incidence of CV death or non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure. Cox regression models, stratified for country, were fitted to relate baseline characteristics to outcome. Our analyses included 7471 predominantly male patients. Overall, 222 deaths were registered of whom 58% were cardiovascular. The incidence of the primary outcome was 42 per 1000 person-years. Comorbidities were strongly and significantly associated with the primary outcome (multivariately adjusted hazard ratio HR, 95% confidence interval): severe chronic kidney disease (HR 2.36, 1.44–3.85), uncontrolled diabetes (HR 1.89, 1.50–2.38), resting heart rate ≥ 75 bpm (HR 1.74, 1.30–2.32), history of stroke (HR 1.70, 1.27–2.29), peripheral artery disease (HR 1.48, 1.09–2.01), history of heart failure (HR 1.47, 1.08–2.01) and history of acute myocardial infarction (HR 1.27, 1.05–1.53). Low education and feelings of depression were significantly associated with increased risk. Lifestyle factors such as persistent smoking, insufficient physical activity and central obesity were not significantly related to adverse outcome. Blood pressure and LDL-C levels appeared to be unrelated to cardiovascular events irrespective of treatment. In patients with stabilized CHD, comorbid conditions that may reflect the ubiquitous nature of atherosclerosis, dominate lifestyle-related and other modifiable risk factors in terms of prognosis, at least over a 2-year follow-up period.
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2.
  • De Smedt, Delphine, et al. (författare)
  • Cost-effectiveness of optimized adherence to prevention guidelines in European patients with coronary heart disease : Results from the EUROASPIRE IV survey
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cardiology. - Elsevier. - 0167-5273. ; 272, s. 20-25
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of optimized guideline adherence in patients with a history of coronary heart disease. Methods: An individual-based decision tree model was developed using the SMART risk score tool which estimates the 10-year risk for recurrent vascular events in patients with manifest cardiovascular disease (CVD). Analyses were based on the EUROASPIRE IV survey. Outcomes were expressed as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results: Data from 4663 patients from 13 European countries were included in the analyses. The mean estimated 10-year risk for a recurrent vascular event decreased from 20.13% to 18.61% after optimized guideline adherence. Overall, an ICER of 52,968€/QALY was calculated. The ICER lowered to 29,093€/QALY when only considering high-risk patients (≥20%) with decreasing ICERs in higher risk patients. Also, a dose-response relationship was seen with lower ICERs in older patients and in those patients with higher risk reductions. A less stringent LDL target (<2.5 mmol/L vs. <1.8 mmol/L) lowered the ICER to 32,591€/QALY and intensifying cholesterol treatment in high-risk patients (≥20%) instead of high-cholesterol patients lowered the ICER to 28,064€/QALY. An alternative method, applying risk reductions to the CVD events instead of applying risk reductions to the risk factors lowered the ICER to 31,509€/QALY. Conclusion: Depending on the method used better or worse ICERs were found. In addition, optimized guidelines adherence is more cost-effective in higher risk patients, in patients with higher risk reductions and when using a less strict LDL-C target. Current analyses advice to maximize guidelines adherence in particular patient subgroups.
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  • Sator, Lea, et al. (författare)
  • Overdiagnosis of COPD in Subjects With Unobstructed Spirometry A BOLD Analysis
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Chest. - 0012-3692 .- 1931-3543. ; 156:2, s. 277-288
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>BACKGROUND: There are several reports on underdiagnosis of COPD, while little is known about COPD overdiagnosis and overtreatment. We describe the overdiagnosis and the prevalence of spirometrically defined false positive COPD, as well as their relationship with overtreatment across 23 population samples in 20 countries participating in the BOLD Study between 2003 and 2012.</p><p>METHODS: A false positive diagnosis of COPD was considered when participants reported a doctor's diagnosis of COPD, but postbronchodilator spirometry was unobstructed (FEV1/FVC &gt; LLN). Additional analyses were performed using the fixed ratio criterion (FEV1/FVC &lt; 0.7).</p><p>RESULTS: Among 16,177 participants, 919 (5.7%) reported a previous medical diagnosis of COPD. Postbronchodilator spirometry was unobstructed in 569 subjects (61.9%): false positive COPD. A similar rate of overdiagnosis was seen when using the fixed ratio criterion (55.3%). In a subgroup analysis excluding participants who reported a diagnosis of "chronic bronchitis" or "emphysema" (n = 220), 37.7% had no airflow limitation. The site-specific prevalence of false positive COPD varied greatly, from 1.9% in low- to middle-income countries to 4.9% in high-income countries. In multivariate analysis, overdiagnosis was more common among women, and was associated with higher education; former and current smoking; the presence of wheeze, cough, and phlegm; and concomitant medical diagnosis of asthma or heart disease. Among the subjects with false positive COPD, 45.7% reported current use of respiratory medication. Excluding patients with reported asthma, 34.4% of those with normal spirometry still used a respiratory medication.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: False positive COPD is frequent. This might expose nonobstructed subjects to possible adverse effects of respiratory medication.</p>
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  • Bamia, Christina, et al. (författare)
  • Self-rated health and all-cause and cause-specific mortality of older adults : Individual data meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies in the CHANCES Consortium
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Maturitas. - 0378-5122 .- 1873-4111. ; 103, s. 37-44
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Objectives: To evaluate, among the elderly, the association of self-rated health (SRH) with mortality, and to identify determinants of self-rating health as “at-least-good”.</p><p>Study design: Individual data on SRH and important covariates were obtained for 424,791 European and United States residents, ≥60 years at recruitment (1982–2008), in eight prospective studies in the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES). In each study, adjusted mortality ratios (hazard ratios, HRs) in relation to SRH were calculated and subsequently combined with random-effect meta-analyses.</p><p>Main outcome measures: All-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality.</p><p>Results: Within the median 12.5 years of follow-up, 93,014 (22%) deaths occurred. SRH “fair” or “poor” vs. “at-least-good” was associated with increased mortality: HRs 1.46 (95% CI 1·23–1.74) and 2.31 (1.79–2.99), respectively. These associations were evident: for cardiovascular and, to a lesser extent, cancer mortality, and within-study, within-subgroup analyses. Accounting for lifestyle, sociodemographic, somatometric factors and, subsequently, for medical history explained only a modest amount of the unadjusted associations. Factors favourably associated with SRH were: sex (males), age (younger-old), education (high), marital status (married/cohabiting), physical activity (active), body mass index (non-obese), alcohol consumption (low to moderate) and previous morbidity (absence).</p><p>Conclusion: SRH provides a quick and simple tool for assessing health and identifying groups of elders at risk of early mortality that may be useful also in clinical settings. Modifying determinants of favourably rating health, e.g. by increasing physical activity and/or by eliminating obesity, may be important for older adults to “feel healthy” and “be healthy”.</p>
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9.
  • Cameron, Adrian J., et al. (författare)
  • Combined Influence of Waist and Hip Circumference on Risk of Death in a Large Cohort of European and Australian Adults
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Journal of the American Heart Association : Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease. - John Wiley & Sons. - 2047-9980 .- 2047-9980. ; 9:13
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: Waist circumference and hip circumference are both strongly associated with risk of death; however, their joint association has rarely been investigated.</p><p>Methods and Results: The MONICA Risk, Genetics, Archiving, and Monograph (MORGAM) Project was conducted in 30 cohorts from 11 countries; 90 487 men and women, aged 30 to 74 years, predominantly white, with no history of cardiovascular disease, were recruited in 1986 to 2010 and followed up for up to 24 years. Hazard ratios were estimated using sex‐specific Cox models, stratified by cohort, with age as the time scale. Models included baseline categorical obesity measures, age, total and high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure<em>,</em> antihypertensive drugs, smoking, and diabetes mellitus. A total of 9105 all‐cause deaths were recorded during a median follow‐up of 10 years. Hazard ratios for all‐cause death presented J‐ or U‐shaped associations with most obesity measures. With waist and hip circumference included in the same model, for all hip sizes, having a smaller waist was strongly associated with lower risk of death, except for men with the smallest hips. In addition, among those with smaller waists, hip size was strongly negatively associated with risk of death, with ≈20% more people identified as being at increased risk compared with waist circumference alone.</p><p>Conclusions: A more complex relationship between hip circumference, waist circumference, and risk of death is revealed when both measures are considered simultaneously. This is particularly true for individuals with smaller waists, where having larger hips was protective. Considering both waist and hip circumference in the clinical setting could help to best identify those at increased risk of death.</p>
10.
  • Ferrario, Marco M., et al. (författare)
  • Determinants of social inequalities in stroke incidence across Europe : a collaborative analysis of 126 635 individuals from 48 cohort studies
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. - BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP. - 0143-005X .- 1470-2738. ; 71:12, s. 1210-1216
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>Background:</strong> Knowledge on the origins of the social gradient in stroke incidence in different populations is limited. This study aims to estimate the burden of educational class inequalities in stroke incidence and to assess the contribution of risk factors in determining these inequalities across Europe.</p><p><strong>Materials and methods:</strong> The MORGAM (MOnica Risk, Genetics, Archiving and Monograph) Study comprises 48 cohorts recruited mostly in the 1980s and 1990s in four European regions using standardised procedures for baseline risk factor assessment and fatal and non-fatal stroke ascertainment and adjudication during follow-up. Among the 126 635 middle-aged participants, initially free of cardiovascular diseases, generating 3788 first stroke events during a median follow-up of 10 years, we estimated differences in stroke rates and HRs for the least versus the most educated individuals.</p><p><strong>Results:</strong> Compared with their most educated counterparts, the overall age-adjusted excess hazard for stroke was 1.54 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.91) and 1.41 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.71) in least educated men and women, respectively, with little heterogeneity across populations. Educational class inequalities accounted for 86–413 and 78–156 additional stroke events per 100 000 person-years in the least compared with most educated men and women, respectively. The additional events were equivalent to 47%–130% and 40%–89% of the average incidence rates. Inequalities in risk factors accounted for 45%–70% of the social gap in incidence in the Nordic countries, the UK and Lithuania-Kaunas (men), but for no more than 17% in Central and South Europe. The major contributors were cigarette smoking, alcohol intake and body mass index.</p><p><strong>Conclusions:</strong> Social inequalities in stroke incidence contribute substantially to the disease rates in Europe. Healthier lifestyles in the most disadvantaged individuals should have a prominent impact in reducing both inequalities and the stroke burden.</p>
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