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Sökning: WFRF:(Pohl Petra)

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1.
  • Lindgren, Helena, et al. (författare)
  • End users transforming experiences into formal information and process models for personalised health interventions
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. - 0926-9630. ; 205, s. 378-382
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Five physiotherapists organised a user-centric design process of a knowledge-based support system for promoting exercise and preventing falls. The process integrated focus group studies with 17 older adults and prototyping. The transformation of informal medical and rehabilitation expertise and older adults' experiences into formal information and process models during the development was studied. As tool they used ACKTUS, a development platform for knowledge-based applications. The process became agile and incremental, partly due to the diversity of expectations and preferences among both older adults and physiotherapists, and the participatory approach to design and development. In addition, there was a need to develop the knowledge content alongside with the formal models and their presentations, which allowed the participants to test hands-on and evaluate the ideas, content and design. The resulting application is modular, extendable, flexible and adaptable to the individual end user. Moreover, the physiotherapists are able to modify the information and process models, and in this way further develop the application. The main constraint was found to be the lack of support for the initial phase of concept modelling, which lead to a redesigned user interface and functionality of ACKTUS.
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  • Pohl, Petra, et al. (författare)
  • A qualitative exploration of post-acute stroke participants' experiences of a multimodal intervention incorporating horseback riding
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - 1932-6203. ; 13:9
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Multimodal rehabilitation interventions delivered in late phase of stroke recovery involve physical (motor and sensory), social, and cognitively challenging activities. Horseback riding can be incorporated within such interventions, leading to meaningful long-term improvements when applied to individuals with moderate levels of disability. There is a lack of research illuminating stroke survivors experiences and perceptions of horseback riding in the context of multimodal interventions. Aim To explore stroke survivors experiences of participation in a multimodal group-based intervention that included horseback riding. Methods An explorative interview study was conducted with individual face-to-face interviews performed on a single occasion, utilising a semi-structured interview guide. Eighteen participants were purposively selected from a larger trial (mean age 62, 12 men, 6 women) within four weeks after treatment completion. The interview duration was between 17 and 50 minutes. The data was analysed using a qualitative content analysis method. Findings Four broad themes were identified from the analysis. These themes were: transformative experiences; human-horse interaction; togetherness and belonging; and the all-in-one solution. Interacting with the horse and peers had a profound emotional impact on the participants. The participants also reported having learned new skills, increased self-efficacy and self-esteem, and improvements in balance and gait, all of which could be transferred to everyday life. The horse itself played a central role, but other components, such as the other group members, the instructors, and the challenging tasks on the horseback, were also important. Conclusion A multimodal rehabilitation intervention that includes horseback riding may provide stroke survivors in a late phase of recovery with rich pleasurable experiences that may have life-changing and profound impacts on their emotional and physical state.
5.
  • Pohl, Petra, et al. (författare)
  • Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years a prospective long-term follow-up study
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: BMC Geriatrics. - BioMed Central. - 1471-2318. ; 14:1, s. 120
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.METHODS: Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, ≥2 non-injurious falls, and ≥1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.RESULTS: During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.CONCLUSIONS: In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.
6.
  • Pohl, Petra, et al. (författare)
  • Experiences from a multimodal rhythm and music-based rehabilitation program in late phase of stroke recovery - A qualitative study
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Plos One. - 1932-6203. ; 13:9
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Rehabilitative stroke interventions based on principles of multimodal stimulation have the potential to profoundly affect neuroplastic processes beyond the sub-acute phase. In order to identify important core mechanisms, there is a need to explore how interventions that combine physical, social, sensory, and cognitively challenging activities are perceived and experienced by the participants. This qualitative study, based on an interpretive interactionist perspective, explored the experiences of stroke survivors who participated in a group-based multimodal rehabilitation program based on rhythm and music. Methods and findings Within four weeks after completion of the multimodal rehabilitation program, face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted on a single occasion with 15 purposively selected individuals (mean age 65, 8 men, 7 women). The interview duration was between 13 and 44 minutes. Qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach was used to analyze data. Three categories were identified, each containing several sub-categories: To be intellectually challenged (energy-consuming activity and coordinating multiple input and output), Perceived therapeutic benefits (motor skills, cognitive skills, emotional and psychological responses), and Pros and cons with social integration (fellowship, competing with others, and instructor characteristics). From these categories, an overall theme was derived: The multifaceted layers of multimodal stimulation. Enjoying music, being part of a group with peers, a skilled instructor, and being able to manage the challenging movements, were related to positive experiences. In contrast, negative experiences were associated with not being able to perform the exercises, and with group members who dominated the conversational space. Conclusion This study shows that access to a multimodal rehabilitation program with rhythm and music as operating ingredients may contribute to positive experiences for many individuals in a late phase after stroke in terms of motor, cognitive, as well as emotional enhancements. Important components were the music, the social interaction, the challenging exercises, and the skilled instructor.
7.
  • Pohl, Petra, et al. (författare)
  • Fall risk awareness and safety precautions taken by older community-dwelling women and men A qualitative study using focus group discussions
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - 1932-6203. ; 10:3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • INTRODUCTION: Daily life requires frequent estimations of the risk of falling and the ability to avoid a fall. The objective of this study was to explore older women's and men's understanding of fall risk and their experiences with safety precautions taken to prevent falls.METHODS: A qualitative study with focus group discussions was conducted. Eighteen community-dwelling people [10 women and 8 men] with and without a history of falls were purposively recruited. Participants were divided into two groups, and each group met four times. A participatory and appreciative action and reflection approach was used to guide the discussions. All discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis, and categories were determined inductively.FINDINGS: Three categories describing the process of becoming aware of fall risks in everyday life were identified: 1] Facing various feelings, 2] Recognizing one's fall risk, and 3] Taking precautions. Each category comprised several subcategories. The comprehensive theme derived from the categories was "Safety precautions through fall risk awareness". Three strategies of ignoring [continuing a risky activity], gaining insight [realizing the danger in a certain situation], and anticipating [thinking ahead and acting in advance] were related to all choices of actions and could fluctuate in the same person in different contexts.CONCLUSIONS: The fall risk awareness process might be initiated for various reasons and can involve different feelings and precautions as well as different strategies. This finding highlights that there are many possible channels to reach older people with information about fall risk and fall prevention, including the media and their peers. The findings offer a deeper understanding of older peoples' conceptualizations about fall risk awareness and make an important contribution to the development and implementation of fall prevention programmes.
8.
  • Pohl, Petra, 1965- (författare)
  • Falls in older community-dwelling women and men risk factors and safety strategies. Fall risk awareness, fear of falling, and preferred exercise properties from a gender perspective.
  • 2015
  • Doktorsavhandling (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Background Falls are the leading cause for non-fatal injuries in older community-dwelling people. Compared to men, women fall more often, experience more fall-related injuries, and report fear of falling (FoF) more often. Falls may be prevented with specific exercises, but adherence is often low in long-term. One aim of the thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of the risk factors previous falls, FoF, and gender. Another aim was to explore safety strategies in older community-dwelling people in terms of fall risk awareness and actions taken to protect from falls, and to identify motives for exercising and preferred exercise properties. A gender perspective was used throughout the thesis.Methods To determine the impact of the risk factors on future falls and injurious falls, a cross-sectional design was used combined with longitudinal data. Baseline data from 230 community-dwelling people over 75 years were collected with questionnaires and performance-based tests. FoF was measured with the single item question “Are you afraid of falling?”. Monthly fall calendars were collected for one year (monitoring year). Based on status on falls, participants were classified as those with i) no falls (n=119), ii) 1 non-injurious fall (n=51), iii) ≥2 non-injurious falls (n=40), and iv) ≥1 injurious fall (n=20). These data were linked to data from an injury database (IDB) with respect to registered injurious falls for a period of about 5 years (long term follow-up). Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of future injurious fall events. To find relationships between FoF, gender, and falls (defined as two or more falls), a general log-linear analysis was performed. Associations between FoF and the components of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) were explored with a structural equation model. To explore fall risk awareness and safety strategies, and to identify motives and preferred exercise properties, qualitative study design was used. Multistage focus groups were held with 18 community-dwelling people (10 women and 8 men) between 70 and 80 years. Transcriptions were analysed with qualitative content analysis.Results Fourty-eight per cent of the 230 participants fell at least once during the monitoring year, and 23% experienced recurrent falls. Compared to men, women reported FoF more often, but did not experience more recurrent falls, and no more injurious falls. FoF was significantly associated with the ICF components Activity/Participation and Personal Factors in women and men both; but in opposite directions for women and men on Personal Factors. During the long-term follow-up, 91 injurious falls were registered in 70 participants (30%). Those with injurious falls during the monitoring year were at significant risk of experiencing new injurious falls in long-term (HR 2.78; 95% CI 1.40-5.50), compared to those with no falls. Women experienced a higher rate of fractures than did men. Analyses from the multistage focus groups resulted in three categories: Facing various feelings; Recognizing one’s fall risk; and Taking precautions. A comprehensive theme tied them together: Safety precautions through fall risk awareness. Analyses also resulted in six categories identifying preferred exercise properties in the context of falls prevention: Motives to start exercise; Barriers to start exercise; Exercise characteristics; Confirmation; Spirit lifters; and Maintenance tricks. All categories included sub-categories. Both studies revealed greater variations among women and among men than between women and men.Conclusion Community-dwelling people over 75 years who have experienced an injurious fall are at high risk of sustaining new injurious falls the forthcoming five years, and should be offered multifactorial fall risk assessments with targeted interventions to optimize the prevention of future falls. The single item question “Are you afraid of falling?” has no predictive value for future falls, and the answer may be strongly gendered. The questions should therefore be avoided in clinical practice and research in community settings. The participants of the qualitative studies implicity and explicitly described how they had become aware of fall risks in everyday life, and both women and men took precautionary actions. Raised fall risk awareness was achieved by several channels including the media, and by meeting with peers and professionals with expertise in falls prevention. A wide variety of preferred exercise properties in the context of falls prevention were identified among the older community-dwelling people. The variations of the requests were greater among women and among men than between women and men. The results should be taken into consideration when offering exercise-based falls prevention interventions to older people. The results from this thesis indicated that measures can be taken on a broad front in order to reduce the damage from injurious falls in older community-dwelling people. A gender perspective is warranted for in clinical practice and future research. Adopting a gender perspective may broaden the understanding of gender differences and similarities when implementing falls prevention activities.
9.
  • Pohl, Petra, et al. (författare)
  • Gender perspective on fear of falling using the classification of functioning as the model
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation. - Informa Healthcare. - 0963-8288. ; 37:3, s. 214-222
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Abstract Purpose: To investigate associations between fear of falling (FOF) and recurrent falls among women and men, and gender differences in FOF with respect to International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Methods: Community-dwelling people (n = 230, 75-93 years, 72% women) were included and followed 1 year regarding falls. Data collection included self-reported demographics, questionnaires, and physical performance-based tests. FOF was assessed with the question "Are you afraid of falling?". Results were discussed with a gender relational approach. Results: At baseline 55% women (n = 92) and 22% men (n = 14) reported FOF. During the follow-up 21% women (n = 35) and 30% men (n = 19) experienced recurrent falls. There was an association between gender and FOF (p = 0.001), but not between FOF and recurrent falls (p = 0.79), or between gender and recurrent falls (p = 0.32). FOF was related to Personal factors and Activity and Participation. The relationship between FOF and Personal factors was in opposite directions for women and men. Conclusions: Results did not support the prevailing paradigm that FOF increases rate of recurrent falls in community-dwelling people, and indicated that the answer to "Are you afraid of falling?" might be highly influenced by gendered patterns.Implications for RehabilitationThe question "Are you afraid of falling?" has no predictive value when screening for the risk of falling in independent community-dwelling women or men over 75 years of age.Gendered patterns might influence the answer to the question "Are you afraid of falling?" Healthcare personnel are recommended to be aware of this when asking older women and men about fear of falling.
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10.
  • Pohl, Petra, et al. (författare)
  • Group-based music intervention in Parkinsons disease findings from a mixed-methods study
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Clinical Rehabilitation. - Sage Publications. - 0269-2155 .- 1477-0873.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: To evaluate a group-based music intervention in patients with Parkinsons disease. Design: Parallel group randomized controlled trial with qualitative triangulation. Setting: Neurorehabilitation in primary care. Subjects: Forty-six patients with Parkinsons disease were randomized into intervention group (n = 26), which received training with the music-based intervention, and control group (n = 20) without training. Interventions: The intervention was delivered twice weekly for 12 weeks. Main measures: Primary outcome was Timed-Up-and-Go subtracting serial 7s (dual-task ability). Secondary outcomes were cognition, balance, concerns about falling, freezing of gait, and quality of life. All outcomes were evaluated at baseline, post-intervention, and three months post-intervention. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with the intervention group and with the delivering physiotherapists. Results: No between-group differences were observed for dual-task ability. Between-group differences were observed for Falls Efficacy Scale (mean difference (MD) = 6.5 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.0 to 10.0, P = 0.001) and for Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 items (MD = 8.3; 95% CI = 2.7 to 13.8, P = 0.005) when compared to the control group post-intervention, but these were not maintained at three months post-intervention. Three themes were derived from the interviews: Expectations versus Results, Perspectives on Treatment Contents, and Key Factors for Success. Conclusion: Patient-reported outcomes and interviews suggest that the group-based music intervention adds value to mood, alertness, and quality of life in patients with Parkinsons disease. The study does not support the efficacy in producing immediate or lasting gains in dual-tasking, cognition, balance, or freezing of gait.
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