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Sökning: WFRF:(Ribom Eva)

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1.
  • Cawthon, P. M., et al. (författare)
  • Putative Cut-Points in Sarcopenia Components and Incident Adverse Health Outcomes: AnSDOCAnalysis
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. - : WILEY. - 0002-8614 .- 1532-5415. ; 68:7, s. 1429-1437
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVES Analyses performed by the Sarcopenia Definitions and Outcomes Consortium (SDOC) identified cut-points in several metrics of grip strength for consideration in a definition of sarcopenia. We describe the associations between the SDOC-identified metrics of low grip strength (absolute or standardized to body size/composition); low dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) lean mass as previously defined in the literature (appendicular lean mass [ALM]/ht(2)); and slowness (walking speed <.8 m/s) with subsequent adverse outcomes (falls, hip fractures, mobility limitation, and mortality). DESIGN Individual-level, sex-stratified pooled analysis. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) for incident falls, mobility limitation, hip fractures, and mortality. Follow-up time ranged from 1 year for falls to 8.8 +/- 2.3 years for mortality. SETTING Eight prospective observational cohort studies. PARTICIPANTS A total of 13,421 community-dwelling men and 4,828 community-dwelling women. MEASUREMENTS Grip strength by hand dynamometry, gait speed, and lean mass by DXA. RESULTS Low grip strength (absolute or standardized to body size/composition) was associated with incident outcomes, usually independently of slowness, in both men and women. ORs and HRs generally ranged from 1.2 to 3.0 for those below vs above the cut-point. DXA lean mass was not consistently associated with these outcomes. When considered together, those who had both muscle weakness by absolute grip strength (<35.5 kg in men and <20 kg in women) and slowness were consistently more likely to have a fall, hip fracture, mobility limitation, or die than those without either slowness or muscle weakness. CONCLUSION Older men and women with both muscle weakness and slowness have a higher likelihood of adverse health outcomes. These results support the inclusion of grip strength and walking speed as components in a summary definition of sarcopenia.
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2.
  • Cronholm, F., et al. (författare)
  • The fracture predictive ability of a musculoskeletal composite score in old men - data from the MrOs Sweden study
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: BMC Geriatr. - : BioMed Central (BMC). - 1471-2318. ; 19:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BackgroundDetection of high-risk individuals for fractures are needed. This study assessed whether level of physical activity (PA) and a musculoskeletal composite score could be used as fracture predictive tools, and if the score could predict fractures better than areal bone mineral density (aBMD).MethodsMrOs Sweden is a prospective population-based observational study that at baseline included 3014 men aged 69-81years. We assessed femoral neck bone mineral content (BMC), bone area, aBMD and total body lean mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, calcaneal speed of sound by quantitative ultrasound and hand grip strength by a handheld dynamometer. PA was assessed by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) questionnaire. We followed the participants until the date of first fracture, death or relocation (median 9.6years). A musculoskeletal composite score was calculated as mean Z-score of the five measured traits. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the association between the musculoskeletal traits, the composite score and incident fractures (yes/no) during the follow-up period. Data are presented as hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for fracture for a+1 standard deviation (SD) change (+1 Z-score) in the various musculoskeletal traits as well as the composite score. We used a linear regression model to estimate the association between level of PA, measured as PASE-score and the different musculoskeletal traits as well as the composite score.ResultsA+1 SD higher composite score was associated with an incident fracture HR of 0.61 (0.54, 0.69), however not being superior to aBMD in fracture prediction. A+1 SD higher PASE-score was associated with both a higher composite score and lower fracture incidence (HR 0.83 (0.76, 0.90)).ConclusionsThe composite score was similar to femoral neck aBMD in predicting fractures, and also low PA predicted fractures. This highlights the need of randomized controlled trials to evaluate if PA could be used as a fracture preventive strategy.
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3.
  • Manini, T. M., et al. (författare)
  • Identification of Sarcopenia Components That Discriminate Slow Walking Speed: A Pooled Data Analysis
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. - : WILEY. - 0002-8614 .- 1532-5415. ; 68:7, s. 1419-1428
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND The Sarcopenia Definitions and Outcomes Consortium (SDOC) sought to identify cut points for muscle strength and body composition measures derived from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) that discriminate older adults with slow walking speed. This article presents the core analyses used to guide the SDOC position statements. DESIGN Cross-sectional data analyses of pooled data. SETTING University-based research assessment centers. PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling men (n = 13,652) and women: (n = 5,115) with information on lean mass by DXA, grip strength (GR), and walking speed. MEASUREMENTS Thirty-five candidate sarcopenia variables were entered into sex-stratified classification and regression tree (CART) models to agnostically choose variables and cut points that discriminate slow walkers (<0.80 m/s). Models with alternative walking speed outcomes were also evaluated (<0.60 and <1.0 m/s and walking speed treated continuously). RESULTS CART models identified GR/body mass index (GRBMI) and GR/total body fat (GRTBF) as the primary discriminating variables for slowness in men and women, respectively. Men with GRBMI of 1.05 kg/kg/m(2)or less were approximately four times more likely to be slow walkers than those with GRBMI of greater than 1.05 kg/kg/m(2). Women with GRTBF of less than 0.65 kg/kg were twice as likely to be slow walkers than women with GRTBF of 0.65 kg/kg or greater. Models with alternative walking speed outcomes selected only functions of GR as primary discriminators of slowness in both men and women. DXA-derived lean mass measures did not consistently discriminate slow walkers. CONCLUSION GR with and without adjustments for body size and composition consistently discriminated older adults with slowness. CART models did not select DXA-based lean mass as a primary discriminator of slowness. These results were presented to an SDOC Consensus Panel, who used them and other information to develop the SDOC Position Statements.
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4.
  • Ohlsson, Claes, 1965, et al. (författare)
  • Serum DHEA and Its Sulfate Are Associated With Incident Fall Risk in Older Men: The MrOS Sweden Study
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. - : WILEY. - 0884-0431 .- 1523-4681. ; 33:7, s. 1227-1232
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The adrenal-derived hormones dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are the most abundant circulating hormones and their levels decline substantially with age. Many of the actions of DHEAS are considered to be mediated through metabolism into androgens and estrogens in peripheral target tissues. The predictive value of serum DHEA and DHEAS for the likelihood of falling is unknown. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the associations between baseline DHEA and DHEAS levels and incident fall risk in a large cohort of older men. Serum DHEA and DHEAS levels were analyzed with mass spectrometry in the population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study in Sweden (n=2516, age 69 to 81 years). Falls were ascertained every 4 months by mailed questionnaires. Associations between steroid hormones and falls were estimated by generalized estimating equations. During a mean follow-up of 2.7 years, 968 (38.5%) participants experienced a fall. High serum levels of both DHEA (odds ratio [OR] per SD increase 0.85; 95% CI, 0.78 to 0.92) and DHEAS (OR 0.88, 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.95) were associated with a lower incident fall risk in models adjusted for age, BMI, and prevalent falls. Further adjustment for serum sex steroids or age-related comorbidities only marginally attenuated the associations between DHEA or DHEAS and the likelihood of falling. Moreover, the point estimates for DHEA and DHEAS were only slightly reduced after adjustment for lean mass and/or grip strength. Also, the addition of the narrow walk test did not substantially alter the associations between serum DHEA or DHEAS and fall risk. Finally, the association with incident fall risk remained significant for DHEA but not for DHEAS after simultaneous adjustment for lean mass, grip strength, and the narrow walk test. This suggests that the associations between DHEA and DHEAS and falls are only partially mediated via muscle mass, muscle strength, and/or balance. In conclusion, older men with high DHEA or DHEAS levels have a lesser likelihood of a fall. (c) 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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5.
  • Björk, A., et al. (författare)
  • Variations in the vitamin D receptor gene are not associated with measures of muscle strength, physical performance, or falls in elderly men. Data from MrOS Sweden
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. - : Elsevier. - 0960-0760 .- 1879-1220. ; 187, s. 160-165
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for several musculoskeletal phenotypes. However, previous results on the associations between genetic variants of the VDR with muscle strength and falls have been contradictory. The MrOS Sweden survey, a prospective population-based cohort study of 3014 elderly men (mean age 75 years, range 69–81) offered the opportunity to further investigate these associations. At baseline, data were collected on muscle strength and also the prevalence of falls during the previous 12 months. Genetic association analysis was performed for 7 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), covering the genetic region surrounding the VDR gene in 2924 men with available samples of DNA. Genetic variations in the VDR were not associated with five different measurements of muscle strength or physical performance (hand grip strength right and left, 6 m walking test (easy and narrow) and timed-stands test). However, one of the 7 SNPs of the gene for the VDR receptor, rs7136534, was associated with prevalence of falls (33.6% of the AA, 14.6% of the AG and 16.5% of the GG allele). In conclusion, VDR genetic variants are not related to muscle strength or physical performance in elderly Swedish men. The role of the rs7136534 SNP for the occurrence of falls is not clear.
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6.
  • Harvey, Nicholas C., et al. (författare)
  • Measures of Physical Performance and Muscle Strength as Predictors of Fracture Risk Independent of FRAX, Falls, and aBMD : A Meta-Analysis Of The Osteoporotic Fractures In Men (MrOS) Study
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. - 0884-0431 .- 1523-4681. ; 33:12, s. 2150-2157
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Measures of muscle mass, strength, and function predict risk of incident fractures, but it is not known whether this risk information is additive to that from FRAX (fracture risk assessment tool) probability. In the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study cohorts (Sweden, Hong Kong, United States), we investigated whether measures of physical performance/appendicular lean mass (ALM) by DXA predicted incident fractures in older men, independently of FRAX probability. Baseline information included falls history, clinical risk factors for falls and fractures, femoral neck aBMD, and calculated FRAX probabilities. An extension of Poisson regression was used to investigate the relationship between time for five chair stands, walking speed over a 6 m distance, grip strength, ALM adjusted for body size (ALM/height(2)), FRAX probability (major osteoporotic fracture [MOF]) with or without femoral neck aBMD, available in a subset of n = 7531), and incident MOF (hip, clinical vertebral, wrist, or proximal humerus). Associations were adjusted for age and time since baseline, and are reported as hazard ratios (HRs) for first incident fracture per SD increment in predictor using meta-analysis. 5660 men in the United States (mean age 73.5 years), 2764 men in Sweden (75.4 years), and 1987 men in Hong Kong (72.4 years) were studied. Mean follow-up time was 8.7 to 10.9 years. Greater time for five chair stands was associated with greater risk of MOF (HR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.34), whereas greater walking speed (HR 0.85; 95% CI, 0.79 to 0.90), grip strength (HR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.72 to 0.82), and ALM/height(2) (HR 0.85; 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.90) were associated with lower risk of incident MOF. Associations remained largely similar after adjustment for FRAX, but associations between ALM/height(2) and MOF were weakened (HR 0.92; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.99). Inclusion of femoral neck aBMD markedly attenuated the association between ALM/height(2) and MOF (HR 1.02; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.10). Measures of physical performance predicted incident fractures independently of FRAX probability. Whilst the predictive value of ALM/height(2) was substantially reduced by inclusion of aBMD requires further study, these findings support the consideration of physical performance in fracture risk assessment.
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7.
  • Ribom, Eva L, et al. (författare)
  • Estimation of physical performance and measurements of habitual physical activity may capture men with high risk to fall--data from the Mr Os Sweden cohort.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics. - : Elsevier. - 1872-6976 .- 0167-4943. ; 49:1, s. e72-6
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To evaluate if clinically usable estimates of physical performance and level of habitual physical activity are associated with fall risk in elderly men. A population-based sample of 3014 randomly selected men aged 69-80 years was recruited to medical centers in Gothenburg, Malmoe, or Uppsala. The level of physical activity and self-reported falls during the preceding 12 months was evaluated using a questionnaire. The physical performance ability was estimated by measurements of handgrip strength, a timed stands test, a 6-m walking test and a 20-cm narrow walk test. Falls were reported in 16.5% of the men. Fallers performed 6.2+/-19.0% (mean+/-standard deviations; S.D.) less in right handgrip measures, 8.8+/-40.6% slower in the timed stands test, 6.8+/-30.8% slower in the 6-m walking test, and 5.3+/-28.8% slower in the 20-cm narrow walk test (all p<0.001, respectively). The odds ratio for falls among men who performed <-3 S.D. or failed compared to the mean (+1 S.D. to -1 S.D.) in the timed stands test was 3.41 (95% CI 2.31-5.02; p<0.001) and 2.46 (95% CI 1.80-3.34; p<0.001) in 20-cm narrow walk test. There were more fallers that never were physical active (73.0% vs. 65.4%, p<0.001) and who were sitting more (6.4+/-2.5 h/day vs. 6.0+/-2.3 h/day, p<0.05) than among the non-fallers. Fallers scored less than non-fallers in all the estimates of physical performance and they were more sedentary in their life style. The report suggests that clinical usable tests of physical performance and evaluation of habitual physical activity in the clinical situation possibly can be used to predict risk of falls in elderly men.
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8.
  • Ribom, Eva L, et al. (författare)
  • Population-based reference values of handgrip strength and functional tests of muscle strength and balance in men aged 70-80 years.
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics. - : Elsevier. - 1872-6976 .- 0167-4943. ; 53:2, s. e114-7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • With aging, the incidence of falls and fractures increases. There has during the last decades been secular changes in demographics so that the proportion of elderly increases in society. Hence, there is an increasing need for clinicians to be able to make a solid appraisal of the elderly patient's functional capacity, as to identify individuals with an increased risk to fall. If high risk individuals could be targeted fall preventive strategies might be implemented in specific risk cohorts. This would require reference values for muscle strength tests and functional tests, in order to defined high risk individuals performing inferior. From the MrOS Sweden cohort, 999 subjects aged 70-80 years were evaluated. Muscle strength and functional performance was tested by timed-stands test, 6-m and 20-cm narrow walk tests and Jamar handgrip strength test. Normative data is presented. With increasing age, there was a 10-18% successively decline in performance throughout the entire age span. This study provides reference values for handgrip strength and functional muscle tests in 70-80 years old men. The decline in the test values with increasing age, infer the use of age-specific normative data when using these tests both in clinical and research settings.
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9.
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10.
  • Karlsson, M. K., et al. (författare)
  • Inferior physical performance tests in 10,998 men in the MrOS study is associated with recurrent falls
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Age and Ageing. - : Oxford University Press. - 0002-0729 .- 1468-2834. ; 41:6, s. 740-746
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: recurrent fallers are at especially high risk for injuries. Objective: to study whether tests of physical performance are associated with recurrent falls. Subjects: a total of 10,998 men aged 65 years or above. Methods: questionnaires evaluated falls sustained 12 months preceding testing of grip strength, timed stand, 6-m walk and 20-cm narrow walk test. Means with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) are reported. P < 0.01 is a statistically significant difference. Results: in comparison to both occasional fallers and non-fallers, recurrent fallers performed more poorly on all the physical ability tests (all P < 0.001). A score below -2 standard deviations (SDs) in the right-hand grip strength test was associated with an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% CI 1.7, 3.4) for having had recurrent falls compared with having had no fall and of 2.0 (95% CI 1.3, 3.4) for having had recurrent falls compared with having had an occasional fall. Conclusion: low performance in physical ability tests are in elderly men associated with recurrent falls.
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