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Sökning: WFRF:(Rodriguez GC)

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  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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2.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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3.
  • Naghavi, Mohsen, et al. (författare)
  • Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - : Elsevier. - 1474-547X .- 0140-6736. ; 385:9963, s. 117-171
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specifi c all-cause and cause-specifi c mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries between 1990, and 2013. We used the results to assess whether there is epidemiological convergence across countries. Methods We estimated age-sex-specifi c all-cause mortality using the GBD 2010 methods with some refinements to improve accuracy applied to an updated database of vital registration, survey, and census data. We generally estimated cause of death as in the GBD 2010. Key improvements included the addition of more recent vital registration data for 72 countries, an updated verbal autopsy literature review, two new and detailed data systems for China, and more detail for Mexico, UK, Turkey, and Russia. We improved statistical models for garbage code redistribution. We used six different modelling strategies across the 240 causes; cause of death ensemble modelling (CODEm) was the dominant strategy for causes with sufficient information. Trends for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias were informed by meta-regression of prevalence studies. For pathogen-specifi c causes of diarrhoea and lower respiratory infections we used a counterfactual approach. We computed two measures of convergence (inequality) across countries: the average relative difference across all pairs of countries (Gini coefficient) and the average absolute difference across countries. To summarise broad findings, we used multiple decrement life-tables to decompose probabilities of death from birth to exact age 15 years, from exact age 15 years to exact age 50 years, and from exact age 50 years to exact age 75 years, and life expectancy at birth into major causes. For all quantities reported, we computed 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). We constrained cause-specific fractions within each age-sex-country-year group to sum to all-cause mortality based on draws from the uncertainty distributions. Findings Global life expectancy for both sexes increased from 65.3 years (UI 65.0-65.6) in 1990, to 71.5 years (UI 71.0-71.9) in 2013, while the number of deaths increased from 47.5 million (UI 46.8-48.2) to 54.9 million (UI 53.6-56.3) over the same interval. Global progress masked variation by age and sex: for children, average absolute diff erences between countries decreased but relative diff erences increased. For women aged 25-39 years and older than 75 years and for men aged 20-49 years and 65 years and older, both absolute and relative diff erences increased. Decomposition of global and regional life expectancy showed the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa. For most communicable causes of death both numbers of deaths and age-standardised death rates fell whereas for most non-communicable causes, demographic shifts have increased numbers of deaths but decreased age-standardised death rates. Global deaths from injury increased by 10.7%, from 4.3 million deaths in 1990 to 4.8 million in 2013; but age-standardised rates declined over the same period by 21%. For some causes of more than 100 000 deaths per year in 2013, age-standardised death rates increased between 1990 and 2013, including HIV/AIDS, pancreatic cancer, atrial fibrillation and flutter, drug use disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus for lower respiratory infections. Country-specific probabilities of death over three phases of life were substantially varied between and within regions. Interpretation For most countries, the general pattern of reductions in age-sex specifi c mortality has been associated with a progressive shift towards a larger share of the remaining deaths caused by non-communicable disease and injuries. Assessing epidemiological convergence across countries depends on whether an absolute or relative measure of inequality is used. Nevertheless, age-standardised death rates for seven substantial causes are increasing, suggesting the potential for reversals in some countries. Important gaps exist in the empirical data for cause of death estimates for some countries; for example, no national data for India are available for the past decade.
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4.
  • Bojesen, Stig E., et al. (författare)
  • Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - New york : Nature Publishing Group. - 1546-1718 .- 1061-4036. ; 45:4, s. 371-384
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOG, we analyzed similar to 480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 x 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 x 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 x 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 x 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 x 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 x 10-14) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 x 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.
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5.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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6.
  • Antoniou, A. C., et al. (författare)
  • Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Human Molecular Genetics. - [Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.] Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Canc Res UK Genet Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England. [Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Leone, Melanie] Univ Lyon, CNRS, Hosp Civils Lyon,Ctr Leon Berard,UMR5201, Unite Mixte Genet Constitut Canc Frequents, Lyon, France. [Healey, Sue; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia] Queensland Inst Med Res, Brisbane, Qld 4029, Australia. [Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas] Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland. [Simard, Jacques] Univ Laval, Quebec City, PQ, Canada. [Simard, Jacques] Univ Quebec, Ctr Hosp, Canada Res Chair Oncogenet, Canc Genom Lab, Quebec City, PQ, Canada. Peter MacCallum Canc Inst, Melbourne, Vic 3002, Australia. [Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.] Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Epidemiol, Irvine, CA USA. [Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary] Mayo Clin, Rochester, MN USA. [Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo] Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Milan, Italy. [Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo] Fdn Ist FIRC Oncol Molecolare, Milan, Italy. [Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris] Ist Europeo Oncol, Milan, Italy. [Viel, Alessandra] IRCCS, Ctr Riferimento Oncol, Aviano, Italy. [Bernard, Loris] Cogentech, Consortium Genom Technol, Milan, Italy. [Szabo, Csilla I.] Mayo Clin, Coll Med, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA. [Foretova, Lenka] Masaryk Mem Canc Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Brno, Czech Republic. [Zikan, Michal] Charles Univ Prague, Dept Biochem & Expt Oncol, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic. [Claes, Kathleen] Ghent Univ Hosp, Ctr Med Genet, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. [Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.] US Natl Canc Inst, Clin Genet Branch, Rockville, MD USA. [Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio] CHS Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel. [Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio] Carmel Hosp, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel. [Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio] B Rappaport Fac Med, Haifa, Israel. [Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord] Canc Care Ontario, Ontario Canc Genet Network, Toronto, ON M5G 2L7, Canada. [Andrulis, Irene L.] Mt Sinai Hosp, Fred A Litwin Ctr Canc Genet, Samuel Lunenfeld Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada. [Andrulis, Irene L.] Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada. [Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads] Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Biochem Pharmacol & Genet, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark. [Sunde, Lone] Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark. [Caligo, Maria A.] Univ Pisa, Div Surg Mol & Ultrastructural Pathol, Dept Oncol, Pisa, Italy. [Caligo, Maria A.] Pisa Univ Hosp, Pisa, Italy. [Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Friedman, Eitan] Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Susanne Levy Gertner Oncogenet Unit, IL-52621 Tel Hashomer, Israel. [Kaufman, Bella] Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Inst Oncol, IL-52621 Tel Hashomer, Israel. [Kaufman, Bella; Friedman, Eitan] Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Sch Med, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel. [Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni] Rambam Med Ctr, Genet Inst, Haifa, Israel. [Harbst, Katja] Lund Univ, Dept Oncol, S-22100 Lund, Sweden. [Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna] Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden. [Ehrencrona, Hans] Uppsala Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden. [Karlsson, Per] Sahlgrenska Univ, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden. [Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.] Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA. [Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier] Ctr Invest Biomed Red Enfermedades Raras CIBERERE, Inst Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. [Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier] Spanish Natl Canc Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Human Genet Grp, Madrid, Spain. [Blanco, Ignacio] Catalan Inst Oncol ICO, Canc Genet Counseling Program, Barcelona, Spain. [Lasa, Adriana] Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Genet Serv, Barcelona, Spain. [Hamann, Ute] Deutsch Krebsforschungszentrum, Neuenheimer Feld 580 69120, D-6900 Heidelberg, Germany. [Hogervorst, Frans B. L.] Netherlands Canc Inst, Dept Pathol, Family Canc Clin, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Rookus, Matti A.] Netherlands Canc Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Collee, J. Margriet] Erasmus Univ, Dept Clin Genet, Rotterdam Family Canc Clin, Med Ctr, NL-3000 DR Rotterdam, Netherlands. [Devilee, Peter] Dept Genet Epidemiol, Leiden, Netherlands. [Wijnen, Juul] Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Ctr Human & Clin Genet, Leiden, Netherlands. [Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, NL-6525 ED Nijmegen, Netherlands. [van der Luijt, Rob B.] Univ Utrecht, Med Ctr, Dept Clin Mol Genet, NL-3508 TC Utrecht, Netherlands. [Aalfs, Cora M.] Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Waisfisz, Quinten] Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Amsterdam, Netherlands. [van Roozendaal, Cornelis E. P.] Univ Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Maastricht, Netherlands. [Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona] Cent Manchester Univ Hosp, NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England. [Eeles, Rosalind] Inst Canc Res, Translat Canc Genet Team, London SW3 6JB, England. [Eeles, Rosalind] Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, London, England. [Izatt, Louise] Guys Hosp, Clin Genet, London SE1 9RT, England. [Davidson, Rosemarie] Ferguson Smith Ctr Clin Genet, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. [Chu, Carol] Yorkshire Reg Genet Serv, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England. [Eccles, Diana] Princess Anne Hosp, Wessex Clin Genet Serv, Southampton, Hants, England. [Cole, Trevor] Birmingham Womens Hosp Healthcare, NHS Trust, W Midlands Reg Genet Serv, Birmingham, W Midlands, England. [Hodgson, Shirley] Univ London, Dept Canc Genet, St Georges Hosp, London, England. [Godwin, Andrew K.; Daly, Mary B.] Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA. [Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique] Univ Paris 05, Paris, France. [Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique] Inst Curie, INSERM U509, Serv Genet Oncol, Paris, France. [Buecher, Bruno] Inst Curie, Dept Genet, Paris, France. [Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Lenoir, Gilbert M.] Inst Cancrol Gustave Roussy, Dept Genet, Villejuif, France. [Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte] Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, INSERM U946, Villejuif, France. [Caron, Olivier] Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, Dept Med, Villejuif, France. [Lenoir, Gilbert M.] Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, CNRS FRE2939, Villejuif, France. [Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel] Inst Bergonie, Lab Genet Constitutionnelle, Bordeaux, France. [Longy, Michel] Inst Bergonie, INSERM U916, Bordeaux, France. [Ferrer, Sandra Fert] Hop Hotel Dieu, Ctr Hosp, Lab Genet Chromosom, Chambery, France. [Prieur, Fabienne] CHU St Etienne, Serv Genet Clin Chromosom, St Etienne, France. [Goldgar, David] Univ Utah, Dept Dermatol, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA. [Miron, Alexander; Yassin, Yosuf] Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA 02115 USA. [John, Esther M.] No Calif Canc Ctr, Fremont, CA USA. [John, Esther M.] Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA. [Buys, Saundra S.] Univ Utah, Hlth Sci Ctr, Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA. [Hopper, John L.] Univ Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. [Terry, Mary Beth] Columbia Univ, New York, NY USA. [Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine] Med Univ Vienna, Div Special Gynecol, Dept OB GYN, Vienna, Austria. [Hansen, Thomas V. O.] Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Dept Clin Biochem, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. [Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Reykjavik, Iceland. [Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth] Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, New York, NY 10021 USA. [Piedmonte, Marion] Roswell Pk Canc Inst, GOG Stat & Data Ctr, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA. [Rodriguez, Gustavo C.] Evanston NW Healthcare, NorthShore Univ Hlth Syst, Evanston, IL 60201 USA. [Wakeley, Katie] Tufts Univ, New England Med Ctr, Boston, MA 02111 USA. [Boggess, John F.] Univ N Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA. [Basil, Jack] St Elizabeth Hosp, Edgewood, KY 41017 USA. [Schwartz, Peter E.] Yale Univ, Sch Med, New Haven, CT 06510 USA. [Blank, Stephanie V.] New York Univ, Sch Med, New York, NY 10016 USA. [Toland, Amanda E.] Ohio State Univ, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA. [Toland, Amanda E.] Ohio State Univ, Div Human Canc Genet, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Columbus, OH 43210 USA. [Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia] IRCCS, Ist Oncologico Veneto, Immunol & Mol Oncol Unit, Padua, Italy. [Imyanitov, Evgeny N.] NN Petrov Inst Res Inst, St Petersburg, Russia. [Allavena, Anna] Univ Turin, Dept Genet Biol & Biochem, Turin, Italy. [Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Arnold, Norbert] Univ Cologne, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Div Mol Gynaeco Oncol, Cologne, Germany. [Engel, Christoph] Univ Leipzig, Inst Med Informat Stat & Epidemiol, Leipzig, Germany. [Meindl, Alfons] Tech Univ Munich, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Munich, Germany. [Ditsch, Nina] Univ Munich, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Munich, Germany. Univ Schleswig Holstein, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Campus Kiel, Germany. [Niederacher, Dieter] Univ Duesseldorf, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Mol Genet Lab, Dusseldorf, Germany. [Deissler, Helmut] Univ Ulm, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Ulm, Germany. [Fiebig, Britta] Univ Regensburg, Inst Human Genet, Regensburg, Germany. [Suttner, Christian] Univ Heidelberg, Inst Human Genet, Heidelberg, Germany. [Schoenbuchner, Ines] Univ Wurzburg, Inst Human Genet, D-8700 Wurzburg, Germany. [Gadzicki, Dorothea] Med Univ, Inst Cellular & Mol Pathol, Hannover, Germany. [Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel] Hosp Clinico San Carlos 28040, Madrid, Spain. : Oxford University Press. - 0964-6906 .- 1460-2083. ; 18:22, s. 4442-4456
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 × 10-4]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not. 
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7.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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8.
  • Antoniou, A. C., et al. (författare)
  • Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers : Implications for risk prediction
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Cancer Research. - : American Association for Cancer Research. - 0008-5472 .- 1538-7445. ; 70:23, s. 9742-9754
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10-11 - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.
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9.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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10.
  • Lu, Yingchang, et al. (författare)
  • A Transcriptome-Wide Association Study Among 97,898 Women to Identify Candidate Susceptibility Genes for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk.
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: ; 78:18, s. 5419-5430
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • .AbstractLarge-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified approximately 35 loci associated with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. The majority of GWAS-identified disease susceptibility variants are located in noncoding regions, and causal genes underlying these associations remain largely unknown. Here, we performed a transcriptome-wide association study to search for novel genetic loci and plausible causal genes at known GWAS loci. We used RNA sequencing data (68 normal ovarian tissue samples from 68 individuals and 6,124 cross-tissue samples from 369 individuals) and high-density genotyping data from European descendants of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx V6) project to build ovarian and cross-tissue models of genetically regulated expression using elastic net methods. We evaluated 17,121 genes for their cis-predicted gene expression in relation to EOC risk using summary statistics data from GWAS of 97,898 women, including 29,396 EOC cases. With a Bonferroni-corrected significance level of P < 2.2 × 10−6, we identified 35 genes, including FZD4 at 11q14.2 (Z = 5.08, P = 3.83 × 10−7, the cross-tissue model; 1 Mb away from any GWAS-identified EOC risk variant), a potential novel locus for EOC risk. All other 34 significantly associated genes were located within 1 Mb of known GWAS-identified loci, including 23 genes at 6 loci not previously linked to EOC risk. Upon conditioning on nearby known EOC GWAS-identified variants, the associations for 31 genes disappeared and three genes remained (P < 1.47 × 10−3). These data identify one novel locus (FZD4) and 34 genes at 13 known EOC risk loci associated with EOC risk, providing new insights into EOC carcinogenesis.Significance: Transcriptomic analysis of a large cohort confirms earlier GWAS loci and reveals FZD4 as a novel locus associated with EOC risk. Cancer Res; 78(18); 5419–30. ©2018 AACR.
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