SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Rodriguez Gustavo C) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Rodriguez Gustavo C)

  • Resultat 1-10 av 36
  • [1]234Nästa
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  • Klionsky, Daniel J., et al. (författare)
  • Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Autophagy. - : Landes Bioscience. - 1554-8635 .- 1554-8627. ; 8:4, s. 445-544
  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)abstract
    • In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
  •  
2.
  • Forouzanfar, Mohammad H, et al. (författare)
  • Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries, 1990-2013 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - : Elsevier. - 0140-6736 .- 1474-547X. ; 386:10010, s. 2287-2323
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, particularly of modifiable risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution.METHODS: Attributable deaths, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) have been estimated for 79 risks or clusters of risks using the GBD 2010 methods. Risk-outcome pairs meeting explicit evidence criteria were assessed for 188 countries for the period 1990-2013 by age and sex using three inputs: risk exposure, relative risks, and the theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL). Risks are organised into a hierarchy with blocks of behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks at the first level of the hierarchy. The next level in the hierarchy includes nine clusters of related risks and two individual risks, with more detail provided at levels 3 and 4 of the hierarchy. Compared with GBD 2010, six new risk factors have been added: handwashing practices, occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, childhood wasting, childhood stunting, unsafe sex, and low glomerular filtration rate. For most risks, data for exposure were synthesised with a Bayesian meta-regression method, DisMod-MR 2.0, or spatial-temporal Gaussian process regression. Relative risks were based on meta-regressions of published cohort and intervention studies. Attributable burden for clusters of risks and all risks combined took into account evidence on the mediation of some risks such as high body-mass index (BMI) through other risks such as high systolic blood pressure and high cholesterol.FINDINGS: All risks combined account for 57·2% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 55·8-58·5) of deaths and 41·6% (40·1-43·0) of DALYs. Risks quantified account for 87·9% (86·5-89·3) of cardiovascular disease DALYs, ranging to a low of 0% for neonatal disorders and neglected tropical diseases and malaria. In terms of global DALYs in 2013, six risks or clusters of risks each caused more than 5% of DALYs: dietary risks accounting for 11·3 million deaths and 241·4 million DALYs, high systolic blood pressure for 10·4 million deaths and 208·1 million DALYs, child and maternal malnutrition for 1·7 million deaths and 176·9 million DALYs, tobacco smoke for 6·1 million deaths and 143·5 million DALYs, air pollution for 5·5 million deaths and 141·5 million DALYs, and high BMI for 4·4 million deaths and 134·0 million DALYs. Risk factor patterns vary across regions and countries and with time. In sub-Saharan Africa, the leading risk factors are child and maternal malnutrition, unsafe sex, and unsafe water, sanitation, and handwashing. In women, in nearly all countries in the Americas, north Africa, and the Middle East, and in many other high-income countries, high BMI is the leading risk factor, with high systolic blood pressure as the leading risk in most of Central and Eastern Europe and south and east Asia. For men, high systolic blood pressure or tobacco use are the leading risks in nearly all high-income countries, in north Africa and the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. For men and women, unsafe sex is the leading risk in a corridor from Kenya to South Africa.INTERPRETATION: Behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks can explain half of global mortality and more than one-third of global DALYs providing many opportunities for prevention. Of the larger risks, the attributable burden of high BMI has increased in the past 23 years. In view of the prominence of behavioural risk factors, behavioural and social science research on interventions for these risks should be strengthened. Many prevention and primary care policy options are available now to act on key risks.FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
  •  
3.
  • Mullins, N., et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide association study of more than 40,000 bipolar disorder cases provides new insights into the underlying biology
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 53:76, s. 817-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Bipolar disorder is a heritable mental illness with complex etiology. We performed a genome-wide association study of 41,917 bipolar disorder cases and 371,549 controls of European ancestry, which identified 64 associated genomic loci. Bipolar disorder risk alleles were enriched in genes in synaptic signaling pathways and brain-expressed genes, particularly those with high specificity of expression in neurons of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant signal enrichment was found in genes encoding targets of antipsychotics, calcium channel blockers, antiepileptics and anesthetics. Integrating expression quantitative trait locus data implicated 15 genes robustly linked to bipolar disorder via gene expression, encoding druggable targets such as HTR6, MCHR1, DCLK3 and FURIN. Analyses of bipolar disorder subtypes indicated high but imperfect genetic correlation between bipolar disorder type I and II and identified additional associated loci. Together, these results advance our understanding of the biological etiology of bipolar disorder, identify novel therapeutic leads and prioritize genes for functional follow-up studies. Genome-wide association analyses of 41,917 bipolar disorder cases and 371,549 controls of European ancestry provide new insights into the etiology of this disorder and identify novel therapeutic leads and potential opportunities for drug repurposing.
  •  
4.
  •  
5.
  •  
6.
  • Bentham, James, et al. (författare)
  • A century of trends in adult human height
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: eLIFE. - 2050-084X. ; 5
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.522.7) and 16.5 cm (13.319.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.
  •  
7.
  •  
8.
  • Antoniou, A. C., et al. (författare)
  • Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers : Implications for risk prediction
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Cancer Research. - : American Association for Cancer Research. - 0008-5472 .- 1538-7445. ; 70:23, s. 9742-9754
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10-11 - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers.
  •  
9.
  • Antoniou, A. C., et al. (författare)
  • Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Human Molecular Genetics. - [Antoniou, Antonis C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.] Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Canc Res UK Genet Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England. [Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Leone, Melanie] Univ Lyon, CNRS, Hosp Civils Lyon,Ctr Leon Berard,UMR5201, Unite Mixte Genet Constitut Canc Frequents, Lyon, France. [Healey, Sue; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia] Queensland Inst Med Res, Brisbane, Qld 4029, Australia. [Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas] Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland. [Simard, Jacques] Univ Laval, Quebec City, PQ, Canada. [Simard, Jacques] Univ Quebec, Ctr Hosp, Canada Res Chair Oncogenet, Canc Genom Lab, Quebec City, PQ, Canada. Peter MacCallum Canc Inst, Melbourne, Vic 3002, Australia. [Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.] Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Epidemiol, Irvine, CA USA. [Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary] Mayo Clin, Rochester, MN USA. [Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo] Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Milan, Italy. [Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo] Fdn Ist FIRC Oncol Molecolare, Milan, Italy. [Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris] Ist Europeo Oncol, Milan, Italy. [Viel, Alessandra] IRCCS, Ctr Riferimento Oncol, Aviano, Italy. [Bernard, Loris] Cogentech, Consortium Genom Technol, Milan, Italy. [Szabo, Csilla I.] Mayo Clin, Coll Med, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA. [Foretova, Lenka] Masaryk Mem Canc Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Brno, Czech Republic. [Zikan, Michal] Charles Univ Prague, Dept Biochem & Expt Oncol, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic. [Claes, Kathleen] Ghent Univ Hosp, Ctr Med Genet, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. [Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.] US Natl Canc Inst, Clin Genet Branch, Rockville, MD USA. [Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio] CHS Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel. [Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio] Carmel Hosp, Dept Community Med & Epidemiol, Haifa, Israel. [Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio] B Rappaport Fac Med, Haifa, Israel. [Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord] Canc Care Ontario, Ontario Canc Genet Network, Toronto, ON M5G 2L7, Canada. [Andrulis, Irene L.] Mt Sinai Hosp, Fred A Litwin Ctr Canc Genet, Samuel Lunenfeld Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada. [Andrulis, Irene L.] Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada. [Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads] Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Biochem Pharmacol & Genet, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark. [Sunde, Lone] Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark. [Caligo, Maria A.] Univ Pisa, Div Surg Mol & Ultrastructural Pathol, Dept Oncol, Pisa, Italy. [Caligo, Maria A.] Pisa Univ Hosp, Pisa, Italy. [Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Friedman, Eitan] Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Susanne Levy Gertner Oncogenet Unit, IL-52621 Tel Hashomer, Israel. [Kaufman, Bella] Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Inst Oncol, IL-52621 Tel Hashomer, Israel. [Kaufman, Bella; Friedman, Eitan] Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Sch Med, IL-69978 Tel Aviv, Israel. [Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni] Rambam Med Ctr, Genet Inst, Haifa, Israel. [Harbst, Katja] Lund Univ, Dept Oncol, S-22100 Lund, Sweden. [Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna] Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden. [Ehrencrona, Hans] Uppsala Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden. [Karlsson, Per] Sahlgrenska Univ, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden. [Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.] Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA. [Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier] Ctr Invest Biomed Red Enfermedades Raras CIBERERE, Inst Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. [Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier] Spanish Natl Canc Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Human Genet Grp, Madrid, Spain. [Blanco, Ignacio] Catalan Inst Oncol ICO, Canc Genet Counseling Program, Barcelona, Spain. [Lasa, Adriana] Hosp Santa Creu & Sant Pau, Genet Serv, Barcelona, Spain. [Hamann, Ute] Deutsch Krebsforschungszentrum, Neuenheimer Feld 580 69120, D-6900 Heidelberg, Germany. [Hogervorst, Frans B. L.] Netherlands Canc Inst, Dept Pathol, Family Canc Clin, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Rookus, Matti A.] Netherlands Canc Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Collee, J. Margriet] Erasmus Univ, Dept Clin Genet, Rotterdam Family Canc Clin, Med Ctr, NL-3000 DR Rotterdam, Netherlands. [Devilee, Peter] Dept Genet Epidemiol, Leiden, Netherlands. [Wijnen, Juul] Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Ctr Human & Clin Genet, Leiden, Netherlands. [Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, NL-6525 ED Nijmegen, Netherlands. [van der Luijt, Rob B.] Univ Utrecht, Med Ctr, Dept Clin Mol Genet, NL-3508 TC Utrecht, Netherlands. [Aalfs, Cora M.] Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands. [Waisfisz, Quinten] Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Amsterdam, Netherlands. [van Roozendaal, Cornelis E. P.] Univ Med Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Maastricht, Netherlands. [Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona] Cent Manchester Univ Hosp, NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England. [Eeles, Rosalind] Inst Canc Res, Translat Canc Genet Team, London SW3 6JB, England. [Eeles, Rosalind] Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, London, England. [Izatt, Louise] Guys Hosp, Clin Genet, London SE1 9RT, England. [Davidson, Rosemarie] Ferguson Smith Ctr Clin Genet, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. [Chu, Carol] Yorkshire Reg Genet Serv, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England. [Eccles, Diana] Princess Anne Hosp, Wessex Clin Genet Serv, Southampton, Hants, England. [Cole, Trevor] Birmingham Womens Hosp Healthcare, NHS Trust, W Midlands Reg Genet Serv, Birmingham, W Midlands, England. [Hodgson, Shirley] Univ London, Dept Canc Genet, St Georges Hosp, London, England. [Godwin, Andrew K.; Daly, Mary B.] Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA. [Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique] Univ Paris 05, Paris, France. [Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique] Inst Curie, INSERM U509, Serv Genet Oncol, Paris, France. [Buecher, Bruno] Inst Curie, Dept Genet, Paris, France. [Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Lenoir, Gilbert M.] Inst Cancrol Gustave Roussy, Dept Genet, Villejuif, France. [Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte] Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, INSERM U946, Villejuif, France. [Caron, Olivier] Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, Dept Med, Villejuif, France. [Lenoir, Gilbert M.] Inst Cancerol Gustave Roussy, CNRS FRE2939, Villejuif, France. [Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel] Inst Bergonie, Lab Genet Constitutionnelle, Bordeaux, France. [Longy, Michel] Inst Bergonie, INSERM U916, Bordeaux, France. [Ferrer, Sandra Fert] Hop Hotel Dieu, Ctr Hosp, Lab Genet Chromosom, Chambery, France. [Prieur, Fabienne] CHU St Etienne, Serv Genet Clin Chromosom, St Etienne, France. [Goldgar, David] Univ Utah, Dept Dermatol, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA. [Miron, Alexander; Yassin, Yosuf] Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA 02115 USA. [John, Esther M.] No Calif Canc Ctr, Fremont, CA USA. [John, Esther M.] Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA. [Buys, Saundra S.] Univ Utah, Hlth Sci Ctr, Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA. [Hopper, John L.] Univ Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. [Terry, Mary Beth] Columbia Univ, New York, NY USA. [Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine] Med Univ Vienna, Div Special Gynecol, Dept OB GYN, Vienna, Austria. [Hansen, Thomas V. O.] Univ Copenhagen, Rigshosp, Dept Clin Biochem, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. [Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Reykjavik, Iceland. [Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth] Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, New York, NY 10021 USA. [Piedmonte, Marion] Roswell Pk Canc Inst, GOG Stat & Data Ctr, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA. [Rodriguez, Gustavo C.] Evanston NW Healthcare, NorthShore Univ Hlth Syst, Evanston, IL 60201 USA. [Wakeley, Katie] Tufts Univ, New England Med Ctr, Boston, MA 02111 USA. [Boggess, John F.] Univ N Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA. [Basil, Jack] St Elizabeth Hosp, Edgewood, KY 41017 USA. [Schwartz, Peter E.] Yale Univ, Sch Med, New Haven, CT 06510 USA. [Blank, Stephanie V.] New York Univ, Sch Med, New York, NY 10016 USA. [Toland, Amanda E.] Ohio State Univ, Dept Internal Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA. [Toland, Amanda E.] Ohio State Univ, Div Human Canc Genet, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Columbus, OH 43210 USA. [Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia] IRCCS, Ist Oncologico Veneto, Immunol & Mol Oncol Unit, Padua, Italy. [Imyanitov, Evgeny N.] NN Petrov Inst Res Inst, St Petersburg, Russia. [Allavena, Anna] Univ Turin, Dept Genet Biol & Biochem, Turin, Italy. [Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Arnold, Norbert] Univ Cologne, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Div Mol Gynaeco Oncol, Cologne, Germany. [Engel, Christoph] Univ Leipzig, Inst Med Informat Stat & Epidemiol, Leipzig, Germany. [Meindl, Alfons] Tech Univ Munich, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Munich, Germany. [Ditsch, Nina] Univ Munich, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Munich, Germany. Univ Schleswig Holstein, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Campus Kiel, Germany. [Niederacher, Dieter] Univ Duesseldorf, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Mol Genet Lab, Dusseldorf, Germany. [Deissler, Helmut] Univ Ulm, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Ulm, Germany. [Fiebig, Britta] Univ Regensburg, Inst Human Genet, Regensburg, Germany. [Suttner, Christian] Univ Heidelberg, Inst Human Genet, Heidelberg, Germany. [Schoenbuchner, Ines] Univ Wurzburg, Inst Human Genet, D-8700 Wurzburg, Germany. [Gadzicki, Dorothea] Med Univ, Inst Cellular & Mol Pathol, Hannover, Germany. [Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel] Hosp Clinico San Carlos 28040, Madrid, Spain. : Oxford University Press. - 0964-6906 .- 1460-2083. ; 18:22, s. 4442-4456
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 × 10-4]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not. 
  •  
10.
  • Vos, Theo, et al. (författare)
  • Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 301 acute and chronic diseases and injuries in 188 countries, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - : Elsevier. - 1474-547X .- 0140-6736. ; 386:9995, s. 743-800
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with some important refinements. Results for incidence of acute disorders and prevalence of chronic disorders are new additions to the analysis. Key improvements include expansion to the cause and sequelae list, updated systematic reviews, use of detailed injury codes, improvements to the Bayesian meta-regression method (DisMod-MR), and use of severity splits for various causes. An index of data representativeness, showing data availability, was calculated for each cause and impairment during three periods globally and at the country level for 2013. In total, 35 620 distinct sources of data were used and documented to calculated estimates for 301 diseases and injuries and 2337 sequelae. The comorbidity simulation provides estimates for the number of sequelae, concurrently, by individuals by country, year, age, and sex. Disability weights were updated with the addition of new population-based survey data from four countries. Findings Disease and injury were highly prevalent; only a small fraction of individuals had no sequelae. Comorbidity rose substantially with age and in absolute terms from 1990 to 2013. Incidence of acute sequelae were predominantly infectious diseases and short-term injuries, with over 2 billion cases of upper respiratory infections and diarrhoeal disease episodes in 2013, with the notable exception of tooth pain due to permanent caries with more than 200 million incident cases in 2013. Conversely, leading chronic sequelae were largely attributable to non-communicable diseases, with prevalence estimates for asymptomatic permanent caries and tension-type headache of 2.4 billion and 1.6 billion, respectively. The distribution of the number of sequelae in populations varied widely across regions, with an expected relation between age and disease prevalence. YLDs for both sexes increased from 537.6 million in 1990 to 764.8 million in 2013 due to population growth and ageing, whereas the age-standardised rate decreased little from 114.87 per 1000 people to 110.31 per 1000 people between 1990 and 2013. Leading causes of YLDs included low back pain and major depressive disorder among the top ten causes of YLDs in every country. YLD rates per person, by major cause groups, indicated the main drivers of increases were due to musculoskeletal, mental, and substance use disorders, neurological disorders, and chronic respiratory diseases; however HIV/AIDS was a notable driver of increasing YLDs in sub-Saharan Africa. Also, the proportion of disability-adjusted life years due to YLDs increased globally from 21.1% in 1990 to 31.2% in 2013. Interpretation Ageing of the world's population is leading to a substantial increase in the numbers of individuals with sequelae of diseases and injuries. Rates of YLDs are declining much more slowly than mortality rates. The non-fatal dimensions of disease and injury will require more and more attention from health systems. The transition to non-fatal outcomes as the dominant source of burden of disease is occurring rapidly outside of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results can guide future health initiatives through examination of epidemiological trends and a better understanding of variation across countries.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-10 av 36
  • [1]234Nästa
Typ av publikation
tidskriftsartikel (34)
forskningsöversikt (2)
Typ av innehåll
refereegranskat (35)
övrigt vetenskapligt (1)
Författare/redaktör
Neuhausen, Susan L (27)
Antoniou, Antonis C. (26)
Andrulis, Irene L. (25)
Easton, Douglas F. (25)
Greene, Mark H. (25)
Domchek, Susan M. (24)
visa fler...
Mai, Phuong L. (23)
Godwin, Andrew K. (23)
Couch, Fergus J. (23)
Benitez, Javier (22)
Singer, Christian F. (22)
Hansen, Thomas V. O. (22)
Friedman, E. (21)
Chenevix-Trench, G (21)
Spurdle, Amanda B. (21)
Sinilnikova, Olga M. (21)
Rookus, Matti A. (21)
Nathanson, Katherine ... (21)
McGuffog, L (21)
Nevanlinna, H (20)
Benitez, J. (20)
Peterlongo, P (20)
Simard, J (20)
Thomassen, M (20)
Friedman, Eitan (20)
Karlan, Beth Y. (20)
Nevanlinna, Heli (19)
Hamann, U (19)
Radice, P (19)
Easton, DF (19)
Chenevix-Trench, Geo ... (19)
Thomassen, Mads (19)
Antoniou, AC (19)
McGuffog, Lesley (19)
Montagna, Marco (19)
Simard, Jacques (19)
Laitman, Y (19)
Neuhausen, SL (18)
Hamann, Ute (18)
Meindl, Alfons (18)
Stoppa-Lyonnet, Domi ... (18)
Rodriguez, Gustavo C ... (18)
Laitman, Yael (18)
Gerdes, Anne-Marie (18)
Peterlongo, Paolo (18)
Radice, Paolo (18)
Offit, Kenneth (18)
Stoppa-Lyonnet, D (18)
Mazoyer, S (18)
Greene, MH (18)
visa färre...
Lärosäte
Karolinska Institutet (14)
Uppsala universitet (13)
Lunds universitet (13)
Umeå universitet (10)
Linköpings universitet (7)
Göteborgs universitet (4)
visa fler...
Jönköping University (2)
Mittuniversitetet (2)
Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (1)
Stockholms universitet (1)
Chalmers tekniska högskola (1)
Högskolan Dalarna (1)
visa färre...
Språk
Engelska (36)
Forskningsämne (UKÄ/SCB)
Medicin och hälsovetenskap (33)
Naturvetenskap (6)

År

Kungliga biblioteket hanterar dina personuppgifter i enlighet med EU:s dataskyddsförordning (2018), GDPR. Läs mer om hur det funkar här.
Så här hanterar KB dina uppgifter vid användning av denna tjänst.

 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy