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Sökning: WFRF:(Roswall N.)

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1.
  • Buckland, G, et al. (författare)
  • Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and risk of bladder cancer in the EPIC cohort study
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley & Sons. - 0020-7136. ; 134:10, s. 2504-2511
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • There is growing evidence of the protective role of the Mediterranean diet (MD) on cancer. However, to date no epidemiological study has investigated the influence of the MD on bladder cancer. We evaluated the association between adherence to the MD and risk of urothelial cell bladder cancer (UCC), according to tumor aggressiveness, in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The analysis included 477,312 participants, recruited from ten European countries between 1991 and 2000. Information from validated dietary questionnaires was used to develop a relative Mediterranean diet score (rMED), including nine dietary components. Cox regression models were used to assess the effect of the rMED on UCC risk, while adjusting for dietary energy and tobacco smoking of any kind. Stratified analyses were performed by sex, BMI, smoking status, European region and age at diagnosis. During an average follow-up of 11 years, 1,425 participants (70.9% male) were diagnosed with a first primary UCC. There was a negative but non-significant association between a high versus low rMED score and risk of UCC overall (HR: 0.84 [95% CI 0.69, 1.03]) and risk of aggressive (HR: 0.88 [95% CI 0.61, 1.28]) and non-aggressive tumors (HR: 0.78 [95% CI 0.54, 1.14]). Although there was no effect modification in the stratified analyses, there was a significant 34% (p = 0.043) decreased risk of UCC in current smokers with a high rMED score. In EPIC, the MD was not significantly associated with risk of UCC, although we cannot exclude that a MD may reduce risk in current smokers. What's new? Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is the most common form of bladder cancer. Previous studies suggested that plasma carotenoids, antioxidants found in fruit and vegetables, were associated with a decreased risk of UCC while a high intake of animal protein was associated with an increased cancer risk. Here, the authors conducted the first study to investigate the association between the Mediterranean diet, a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in animal products, and UCC in Europe. They found that adherence to a Mediterranean diet was not significantly associated with UCC, regardless of level of tumour aggressiveness. They point out that these findings are in line with the rather weak evidence for questionnaire-based associations between dietary factors and bladder cancer risk.
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2.
  • Cooper, A. J., et al. (författare)
  • Fruit and vegetable intake and type 2 diabetes: EPIC-InterAct prospective study and meta-analysis
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. - Nature Publishing Group. - 1476-5640. ; 66:10, s. 1082-1092
  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Fruit and vegetable intake (FVI) may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the epidemiological evidence is inconclusive. The aim of this study is to examine the prospective association of FVI with T2D and conduct an updated meta-analysis. In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-InterAct (EPIC-InterAct) prospective case-cohort study nested within eight European countries, a representative sample of 16 154 participants and 12 403 incident cases of T2D were identified from 340 234 individuals with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up. For the meta-analysis we identified prospective studies on FVI and T2D risk by systematic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE until April 2011. In EPIC-InterAct, estimated FVI by dietary questionnaires varied more than twofold between countries. In adjusted analyses the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) comparing the highest with lowest quartile of reported intake was 0.90 (0.80-1.01) for FVI; 0.89 (0.76-1.04) for fruit and 0.94 (0.84-1.05) for vegetables. Among FV subtypes, only root vegetables were inversely associated with diabetes 0.87 (0.77-0.99). In meta-analysis using pooled data from five studies including EPIC-InterAct, comparing the highest with lowest category for FVI was associated with a lower relative risk of diabetes (0.93 (0.87-1.00)). Fruit or vegetables separately were not associated with diabetes. Among FV subtypes, only green leafy vegetable (GLV) intake (relative risk: 0.84 (0.74-0.94)) was inversely associated with diabetes. Subtypes of vegetables, such as root vegetables or GLVs may be beneficial for the prevention of diabetes, while total FVI may exert a weaker overall effect.
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3.
  • Sluijs, I., et al. (författare)
  • Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Digestible Carbohydrate Intake Are Not Associated with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Eight European Countries
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Journal of Nutrition. - American Society for Nutrition. - 1541-6100. ; 143:1, s. 93-99
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The association of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with the risk of type 2 diabetes remains unclear. We investigated associations of dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate with incident type 2 diabetes. We performed a case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study, including a random subcohort (n = 16,835) and incident type 2 diabetes cases (n = 12,403). The median follow-up time was 12 y. Baseline dietary intakes were assessed using country-specific dietary questionnaires. Country-specific HR were calculated and pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate in the subcohort were (mean +/- SD) 56 +/- 4, 127 +/- 23, and 226 +/- 36 g/d, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, GI and GL were not associated with incident diabetes [HR highest vs. lowest quartile (HRQ4) for GI: 1.05 (95% CI = 0.96, 1.16); HRQ4 for GL: 1.07 (95% CI = 0.95, 1.20)]. Digestible carbohydrate intake was not associated with incident diabetes [HRQ4: 0.98(95% CI = 0.86, 1.10)]. In additional analyses, we found that discrepancies in the GI value assignment to foods possibly explain differences in GI associations with diabetes within the same study population. In conclusion, an expansion of the GI tables and systematic GI value assignment to foods may be needed to improve the validity of GI values derived in such studies, after which GI associations may need reevaluation. Our study shows that digestible carbohydrate intake is not associated with diabetes risk and suggests that diabetes risk with high-GI and -GL diets may be more modest than initial studies suggested. J. Nutr. 143: 93-99, 2013.
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5.
  • Brand, J. S., et al. (författare)
  • Diabetes and Onset of Natural Menopause: Results From the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition EDITORIAL COMMENT
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey. - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. - 0029-7828. ; 70:8, s. 507-508
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • The age at natural menopause (ANM) in the Western world ranges from 40 to 60 years, with an average onset of 51 years. The exact mechanisms underlying the timing of ANM are not completely understood. Both genetic and environmental factors are involved. The best-established environmental factor affecting ANM is smoking; menopause occurs 1 to 2 years earlier in smokers. In addition to genetic and environmental factors, chronic metabolic diseases may influence ANM. Some evidence suggests that diabetes may accelerate menopausal onset. With more women of childbearing age receiving a diagnosis of diabetes, it is important to examine the impact of diabetes on reproductive health. This study was designed to determine whether ANM occurs at an earlier age among women who have diabetes before menopause than in women without diabetes. Data were obtained from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, a large multicenter prospective cohort study investigating the relationship between diet, lifestyle, and genetic factors and the incidence of cancer and other chronic diseases. A cohort of 519,978 men and women, mostly aged 27 to 70 years, were recruited primarily from the general population between 1992 and 2000. A total of 367,331 women participated in the EPIC study. After exclusions, 258,898 of these women met study inclusion criteria. Diabetes status at baseline and menopausal age were based on self-report and were obtained through questionnaires. Participants were asked if they had ever been diagnosed with diabetes and if so at what age. Associations of diabetes and age at diabetes diagnosis with ANM were estimated using time-dependent Cox regression analyses, with stratification by center and adjustments for age, smoking, reproductive, and known diabetes risk factors including smoking and with age from birth to menopause or censoring as the underlying time scale. Overall, there was no statistically significant lower risk of becoming menopausal among women with diabetes than women with no diabetes; the hazard ratio (HR) was 0.94, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.89 to 1.01. However, compared with women with no diabetes, women with diabetes before the age of 20 years had an earlier menopause (10-20 years [HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.02-2.01] and <10 years [HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.03-2.43]), whereas women with diabetes at age 50 years or older had a later menopause (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95). No association with ANM was found for diabetes onset between the ages 20 and 50 years. Strengths of the study include its large sample size and the measurement of a broad set of potential confounders. However, there were several limitations. First, results may have been underestimated because of survival bias. Second, the sequence of menopause and diabetes in women with a late age at diabetes is uncertain, as both events occur in a short period, and both diabetes and menopause status were based on self-report, not verified by medical records. Third, no distinction was made between types 1 and 2 diabetes. Although there is no overall association between diabetes and age at menopause, the data suggest that early-onset diabetes may accelerate menopause. The delaying effect of late-onset diabetes on ANM is not in agreement with other studies suggesting the opposite association.
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6.
  • de Batlle, J., et al. (författare)
  • Dietary Folate Intake and Breast Cancer Risk: European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - Oxford University Press. - 1460-2105. ; 107:1, s. 367-367
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • There is limited evidence on the association between dietary folate intake and the risk of breast cancer (BC) by hormone receptor expression in the tumors. We investigated the relationship between dietary folate and BC risk using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). A total of 367993 women age 35 to 70 years were recruited in 10 European countries. During a median follow-up of 11.5 years, 11575 women with BC were identified. Dietary folate intake was estimated from country-specific dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to quantify the association between dietary variables and BC risk. BC tumors were classified by receptor status. Subgroup analyses were performed by menopausal status and alcohol intake. Intake of other B vitamins was considered. All statistical tests were two-sided. A borderline inverse association was observed between dietary folate and BC risk (hazard ratio comparing top vs bottom quintile [HRQ5-Q1] = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.83 to 1.01, P (trend) = .037). In premenopausal women, we observed a statistically significant trend towards lower risk in estrogen receptor-negative BC (HRQ5-Q1 = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.45 to 0.96, P (trend) = .042) and progesterone receptor-negative BC (HRQ5-Q1 = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.51 to 0.97, P (trend) = .021). No associations were found in postmenopausal women. A 14% reduction in BC risk was observed when comparing the highest with the lowest dietary folate tertiles in women having a high (> 12 alcoholic drinks/week) alcohol intake (HRT3-T1 = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.98, P (interaction) = .035). Higher dietary folate intake may be associated with a lower risk of sex hormone receptor-negative BC in premenopausal women.
7.
  • Jeurnink, SM, et al. (författare)
  • Variety in vegetable and fruit consumption and the risk of gastric and esophageal cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - 0020-7136. ; 131:6, s. E963-E973
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Diets high in vegetables and fruits have been suggested to be inversely associated with risk of gastric cancer. However, the evidence of the effect of variety of consumption is limited. We therefore investigated whether consumption of a variety of vegetables and fruit is associated with gastric and esophageal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.METHODS: Data on food consumption and follow-up on cancer incidence was available for 452,269 participants from 10 European countries. After a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, 475 cases of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas (180 non-cardia, 185 cardia, gastric esophageal junction and esophagus, 110 not specified) and 98 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas were observed. Diet Diversity Scores (DDSs) were used to quantify the variety in vegetable and fruit consumption. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to calculate risk ratios.RESULTS: Independent from quantity of consumption, variety in the consumption of vegetables and fruit combined and of fruit consumption alone were statistically significantly inversely associated with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (continuous HR per 2 products increment 0.88; 95%CI 0.79-0.97 and 0.76; 95%CI 0.62-0.94, respectively) with the latter particularly seen in ever smokers. Variety in vegetable and/or fruit consumption was not associated with risk of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas.CONCLUSION: Independent from quantity of consumption, more variety in vegetable and fruit consumption combined and in fruit consumption alone may decrease the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, residual confounding by lifestyle factors can not be excluded. © 2012 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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8.
  • Jenab, M, et al. (författare)
  • Dietary intakes of retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin D and vitamin E in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. - Nature Publishing Group. - 1476-5640. ; 63:4s, s. 150-178
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objectives: To describe the intake of the fat-soluble nutrients retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin D and their food sources among 27 redefined centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 subjects (age range: 35-74 years) completed a single standardized 24-h dietary recall using a computerized interview software program (EPIC-SOFT). Intakes of the fat-soluble nutrients were estimated using the standardized EPIC Nutrient Database. Results: For all the nutrients, in most centres, men had a higher level of intake than did women, even after adjustments for total energy intake and anthropometric confounders. Distinct regional gradients from northern to southern European countries were observed for all nutrients. The level intake of beta-carotene and vitamin E also showed some differences by level of education, smoking status and physical activity. No meaningful differences in the nutrient intake were observed by age range. Conclusions: These results show differences by study centre, gender, age and various lifestyle variables in the intake of retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin D between 10 European countries. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2009) 63, S150-S178; doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2009.79
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10.
  • Landais, E., et al. (författare)
  • Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Nutrients. - 2072-6643. ; 10:6
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Coffee and tea are among the most commonly consumed nonalcoholic beverages worldwide, but methodological differences in assessing intake often hamper comparisons across populations. We aimed to (i) describe coffee and tea intakes and (ii) assess their contribution to intakes of selected nutrients in adults across 10 European countries.Method: Between 1995 and 2000, a standardized 24-h dietary recall was conducted among 36,018 men and women from 27 European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study centres. Adjusted arithmetic means of intakes were estimated in grams (=volume) per day by sex and centre. Means of intake across centres were compared by sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle factors.Results: In women, the mean daily intake of coffee ranged from 94 g/day (similar to 0.6 cups) in Greece to 781 g/day (similar to 4.4 cups) in Aarhus (Denmark), and tea from 14 g/day (similar to 0.1 cups) in Navarra (Spain) to 788 g/day (similar to 4.3 cups) in the UK general population. Similar geographical patterns for mean daily intakes of both coffee and tea were observed in men. Current smokers as compared with those who reported never smoking tended to drink on average up to 500 g/day more coffee and tea combined, but with substantial variation across centres. Other individuals' characteristics such as educational attainment or age were less predictive. In all centres, coffee and tea contributed to less than 10% of the energy intake. The greatest contribution to total sugar intakes was observed in Southern European centres (up to similar to 20%).Conclusion: Coffee and tea intake and their contribution to energy and sugar intake differed greatly among European adults. Variation in consumption was mostly driven by geographical region.
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