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Sökning: WFRF:(Scheurer Michael E.)

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1.
  • Amirian, E. Susan, et al. (författare)
  • Approaching a Scientific Consensus on the Association between Allergies and Glioma Risk : a report from the Glioma International Case-Control Study
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. - American Association for Cancer Research. - 1055-9965 .- 1538-7755. ; 25:2, s. 282-290
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: Several previous studies have found inverse associations between glioma susceptibility and a history of allergies or other atopic conditions. Some evidence indicates that respiratory allergies are likely to be particularly relevant with regard to glioma risk. Using data from the Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC), we examined the effects of respiratory allergies and other atopic conditions on glioma risk. Methods: The GICC contains detailed information on history of atopic conditions for 4,533 cases and 4,171 controls, recruited from 14 study sites across five countries. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling to calculate meta-analysis ORs, we examined the associations between glioma and allergy status, respiratory allergy status, asthma, and eczema. Results: Having a history of respiratory allergies was associated with an approximately 30% lower glioma risk, compared with not having respiratory allergies (mOR, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.90). This association was similar when restricting to high-grade glioma cases. Asthma and eczema were also significantly protective against glioma. Conclusion: A substantial amount of data on the inverse association between atopic conditions and glioma has accumulated, and findings from the GICC study further strengthen the existing evidence that the relationship between atopy and glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Impact: As the literature approaches a consensus on the impact of allergies in glioma risk, future research can begin to shift focus to what the underlying biologic mechanism behind this association may be, which could, in turn, yield new opportunities for immunotherapy or cancer prevention. (C) 2016 AACR.</p>
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  • Amirian, E. Susan, et al. (författare)
  • History of chickenpox in glioma risk a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC)
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Cancer Medicine. - 2045-7634 .- 2045-7634. ; 5:6, s. 1352-1358
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic alpha-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted.</p>
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  • Amirian, E. Susan, et al. (författare)
  • The Glioma International Case-Control Study : A Report From the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Epidemiology. - 0002-9262 .- 1476-6256. ; 183:2, s. 85-91
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010-2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions.</p>
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  • Panagopoulou, Paraskevi, et al. (författare)
  • Parental age and the risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia : results from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology. - 1877-7821 .- 1877-783X. ; 59, s. 158-165
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>Background:</strong></p><p>Parental age has been associated with several childhood cancers, albeit the evidence is still inconsistent.</p><p><strong>Aim:</strong></p><p>To examine the associations of parental age at birth with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among children aged 0-14 years using individual-level data from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) and non-CLIC studies.</p><p><strong>Material/methods: </strong></p><p>We analyzed data of 3182 incident AML cases and 8377 controls from 17 studies [seven registry-based case-control (RCC) studies and ten questionnaire-based case-control (QCC) studies]. AML risk in association with parental age was calculated using multiple logistic regression, meta-analyses, and pooled-effect estimates. Models were stratified by age at diagnosis (infants &lt; 1 year-old vs. children 1-14 years-old) and by study design, using five-year parental age increments and controlling for sex, ethnicity, birthweight, prematurity, multiple gestation, birth order, maternal smoking and education, age at diagnosis (cases aged 1-14 years), and recruitment time period.</p><p><strong>Results:</strong></p><p>Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived from RCC, but not from the QCC, studies showed a higher AML risk for infants of mothers &gt;= 40-year-old (OR = 6.87; 95% CI: 2.12-22.25). There were no associations observed between any other maternal or paternal age group and AML risk for children older than one year.</p><p><strong>Conclusions:</strong></p><p>An increased risk of infant AML with advanced maternal age was found using data from RCC, but not from QCC studies; no parental age-AML associations were observed for older children.</p>
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  • Petridou, Eleni Th., et al. (författare)
  • Advanced parental age as risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia : results from studies of the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Epidemiology. - SPRINGER. - 0393-2990 .- 1573-7284. ; 33:10, s. 965-976
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Advanced parental age has been associated with adverse health effects in the offspring including childhood (0-14 years) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), as reported in our meta-analysis of published studies. We aimed to further explore the association using primary data from 16 studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Data were contributed by 11 case-control (CC) studies (7919 cases and 12,942 controls recruited via interviews) and five nested case-control (NCC) studies (8801 cases and 29,690 controls identified through record linkage of population-based health registries) with variable enrollment periods (1968-2015). Five-year paternal and maternal age increments were introduced in two meta-analyses by study design using adjusted odds ratios (OR) derived from each study. Increased paternal age was associated with greater ALL risk in the offspring (ORCC 1.05, 95% CI 1.00-1.11; ORNCC 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07). A similar positive association with advanced maternal age was observed only in the NCC results (ORCC 0.99, 95% CI 0.91-1.07, heterogeneity I (2) = 58%, p = 0.002; ORNCC 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08). The positive association between parental age and risk of ALL was most marked among children aged 1-5 years and remained unchanged following mutual adjustment for the collinear effect of the paternal and maternal age variables; analyses of the relatively small numbers of discordant paternal-maternal age pairs were not fully enlightening. Our results strengthen the evidence that advanced parental age is associated with increased childhood ALL risk; collinearity of maternal with paternal age complicates causal interpretation. Employing datasets with cytogenetic information may further elucidate involvement of each parental component and clarify underlying mechanisms.</p>
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  • Bondy, Melissa L, et al. (författare)
  • Brain tumor epidemiology : consensus from the Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Cancer. - 0008-543X .- 1097-0142. ; 113:7 Suppl, s. 1953-1968
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Epidemiologists in the Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) have prioritized areas for further research. Although many risk factors have been examined over the past several decades, there are few consistent findings, possibly because of small sample sizes in individual studies and differences between studies in patients, tumor types, and methods of classification. Individual studies generally have lacked samples of sufficient size to examine interactions. A major priority based on available evidence and technologies includes expanding research in genetics and molecular epidemiology of brain tumors. BTEC has taken an active role in promoting understudied groups, such as pediatric brain tumors; the etiology of rare glioma subtypes, such as oligodendroglioma; and meningioma, which, although it is not uncommon, has only recently been registered systematically in the United States. There also is a pressing need for more researchers, especially junior investigators, to study brain tumor epidemiology. However, relatively poor funding for brain tumor research has made it difficult to encourage careers in this area. In this report, BTEC epidemiologists reviewed the group's consensus on the current state of scientific findings, and they present a consensus on research priorities to identify which important areas the science should move to address.</p>
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