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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Selvefors Anneli 1983) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Selvefors Anneli 1983)

  • Resultat 1-10 av 26
  • [1]23Nästa
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1.
  • Camacho-Otero, Juana, et al. (författare)
  • Circular design tools: (how) do they understand the consumer?
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the 3rd PLATE Product Lifetimes And The Environment Conference2019. - 9783798331259
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A move towards a circular economy will require fundamental changes in the way products and services are designed. However, tools for design in the  context of the circular economy  mostly have a narrow product or service focus without acknowledging the role of addressing behaviors and changing practices. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study investigating to what extent circular design tools consider and integrate aspects related to consumption and consumers. Using five circular tools publicly available, the research team analyzed how they address three aspects: circular consumer behaviors, consumer acceptance factors and conditions for adoption. Our analysis shows that although some of the tools acknowledge the need to gather insights around consumption and consumers, they do not address such aspects in detail. When the tools considered consumer aspects, they did so by acknowledging circular consumer behaviors. Rent and rebuy are the most frequently mentioned behaviors, while remunerate, retain and renounce are absent from the tools. Other behaviors such as receive, ritualize, regard, revalue, resell and relinquish are mentioned only once. The tools’ lack of consideration of acceptance factors and contextual conditions is slightly surprising, as most of them advocate for a human-centered approach to product development. Existing circular design tools could thus benefit from integrating concepts and frameworks from fields such as design for sustainable behavior and practice-oriented design.
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2.
  • Hagbert, Pernilla, 1986, et al. (författare)
  • Reducing water consumption
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: 1st RESPONDER Knowledge Brokerage Event on Sustainable Housing, 28-30 March, 2012, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Konferensbidrag (övrigt vetenskapligt)
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3.
  • Karlsson, MariAnne, 1956, et al. (författare)
  • D1.1. Integrated Framework. Deliverable to the MeBeSafe project
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: MeBeSafe – Measures for Behaving Safely in Traffic.
  • Rapport (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • The MeBeSafe project intends to develop, implement and validate interventions that direct road users (drivers and cyclists) towards safer behaviour in common traffic situations which carry an elevated risk. More specifically, the aim is to change habitual traffic behaviour using different nudging interventions, i.e. subconsciously pushing road users in a desired direction without being prohibitive against alternative choices of action. The project will also compare different ways of coaching and evaluate the effect of a combination of nudging and coaching. This deliverable, D1.1 Integrated Framework, describes the work completed within WP1 of the MeBeSafe project. Based on literature reviews, interviews with academic and non-academic experts, discussions and workshops, the deliverable: (i) describes the key characteristics of nudging and coaching respectively; (ii) presents a framework that integrates the two, taking into consideration (in particular) time and frequency; (iii) describes underlying theories and models of relevance for understanding road user behaviour; (iii) explains road user profiles or characteristics of relevance to consider in the design of the interventions (i.e., in WP2, WP3, and WP4), as well as the design and interpretation of the outcome of the field trials (in WP5); and (iv) presents design considerations, i.e. factors that should be observed when improving on the initial ideas and further develop the design of the nudging and coaching interventions. More detailed design guidelines must be developed as part of the work to be completed in WP2, WP3, and WP4.
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5.
  • Mangold, Mikael, 1982, et al. (författare)
  • Who benefits? Effects and perceptions of residential volumetric water billing
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: 2nd Nordic Conference on Consumer Research, 29 May-1 June, 2012, Göteborg.
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • What are the effects and perceptions of increased installation of water metering and volumetric billing in residential areas in Sweden? An interview study was undertaken in a low-income suburb of Göteborg to explore residents’ experiences and opinions. Additionally, the interests of water and energy companies, social affairs committee, real estate owner and maintainer were investigated to contrast the added value of reduced water consumption. Stakeholders either benefit or are disadvantaged by the introduced system. Furthermore, the applied tariff structure fails to motivate all segments of the population to reduce water consumption, yet still inequitably burdens the most financially exposed groups.
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6.
  • Renström, Sara, 1984, et al. (författare)
  • Pathways of Sustainable Behaviours
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the ERSCP-EMSU 2013 conference, 16th Conference of the European Roundtable on Sustainable Consumption and Production (ERSCP) & 7th Conference of the Environmental Management for Sustainable Universities (EMSU), 4 – 7 June 2013, Istanbul, Turkey.. ; , s. 1-18
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The aim of this paper is to chart different paths that users can follow to reduce the environmental impact that occurs during the use of an artefact. Through comparingsustainable behaviours found in own studies and literature, five pathways of sustainable behaviour were identified: Changed use, Mediated use, Regulated artefact, Maintenance and repair, and Choice of artefact. In Path 1 the user starts using an artefact in a more sustainable way. In Path 2 the user invests in a secondary artefact to mediate the use of a primary artefact. In Path 3 the users invest in anartefact that regulate a primary artefacts’ resource use. In Path 4 the user maintains an artefact in good condition and in Path 5 the user invests in an artefact that offersless resource consumption by default.
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7.
  • Renström, Sara, 1984, et al. (författare)
  • Target the Use Phase! Design for Sustainable Behaviour.
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: The 6th International Conference on Life Cycle Management in Gothenburg 2013. ; , s. 1-4
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • One approach to further decrease the environmental impact of products is to target the use phase. According to the Design for Sustainable Behaviour approach different design strategies can be used to enable a more sustainable use of products by influencing the user’s behaviour. The strategies suggested include matching products to users’ current behaviours, enlightening users, spurring or steering theusers towards more sustainable behaviours, and applying a force dimension to the products. Empirical studies demonstrate the feasibility of different strategies.However further knowledge is needed on which strategies to apply in which situations and for what problems.
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8.
  • Rexfelt, Oskar, 1975, et al. (författare)
  • A Toolkit for Designing Products and Services Fit for Circular Consumption
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of EcoDesign 2019 International Symposium. ; , s. 190-197
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • This paper introduces the Use2Use design toolkit – a set of tools that can be used to design for circular consumption. In contrast to other available circular design tools, the toolkit emphasises the importance of applying a user perspective when exploring opportunities for product circularity. It aids designers and other agents to explore user needs, identify consumption-related design challenges, and design products and services that can create enabling preconditions that make it possible, more convenient, and preferable for people to circulate products from use to use. The process to develop the tool is initially presented followed by a description of the toolkit and its five tools. The paper concludes with a discussion regarding how the proposed toolkit compares to other circular design tools and what implications it has for design practice and future research.
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9.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • A Tool for Charting Circular Consumption Journeys
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the 19th European Roundtable for Sustainable Consumption and Production (ERSCP 2019). - 9788409168927 ; 1, s. 47-64
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Circular economy proponents often argue that products should be designed to last long, be fit for circular (re-) production flows, and be offered through circular services. While this is essential for bringing about a transition to a circular economy, changes in consumption are equally important. Transitioning from linear consumption processes (i.e. buying new products, using, and disposing of them as trash) to circular consumption processes (i.e. obtaining pre-used products, using, and passing them on to others) can however be challenging for people. Renting, borrowing, trading and other circular paths of consumption commonly require more time, effort and planning than linear paths of consumption. In order to make it more preferable for people to circulate products from consumer to consumer, products and services should be designed to make circularity convenient and desirable in everyday life. Such design processes require an in-depth understanding of people’s consumption processes. Yet, the available support to explore what circular consumption processes entail for people in everyday life is insufficient. Therefore, this paper introduces a tool for charting circular consumption journeys, which can support the development of products and services fit for circularity. This tool was developed during 2016-2019 in an iterative process in which the tool was tested by industry representatives and design students. In parallel with these activities, a team of researchers continuously developed and refined the tool based on gained insights. The tool aids designers and other agents to chart people’s consumption processes step-by-step, with a focus on people’s activities, actions, decisions and experiences. By charting circular consumption journeys, insight can be gained regarding critical hinders that may keep people from engaging in circular consumption. Moreover, it will unveil consumption-related challenges that should be addressed when designing circular products and services. Overall, the tool can aid organisations to both increase their understanding of circular consumption processes and to explore opportunities to develop products and services for a circular economy.
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10.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Benefits and Difficulties for Industry when Designing for Sustainable Behaviour
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of Sustainable Innovation 2012, Towards Sustainable Product Design: 17th International Conference. 29-30 October 2012, Alanus University, Bonn, Germany. ; , s. 242-249
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The research field of Design for Sustainable Behaviour (DfSB) suggests strategies for promoting more sustainable use of products. The DfSB methodology thus provides opportunities for companies to further reduce their products’ environmental impact and differentiate on the market, still DfSB is not yet systematically applied in industry. This paper highlights benefits and difficulties that companies face when applying design strategies for sustainable behaviour in the product development process. A master thesis project at Electrolux is used as a basis for discussion. In summary, besides the environmental gains, DfSB can spur innovations that fit users’ implicit needs and thus create potential for increased profitability. Nevertheless, companies need to extend their competence within DfSB and methodologies that facilitate the implementation of DfSB in companies’ current product development processes should be developed.
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  • Resultat 1-10 av 26
  • [1]23Nästa
 
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