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Sökning: WFRF:(Shui Irene M.)

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1.
  • Mondul, Alison M., et al. (författare)
  • Vitamin D-Associated Genetic Variation and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. - 1055-9965 .- 1538-7755. ; 24:3, s. 627-630
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: Two recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified SNPs in or near four genes related to circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] concentration. To examine the hypothesized inverse relationship between vitamin D status and breast cancer, we studied the associations between SNPs in these genes and breast cancer risk in a large pooled study of 9,456 cases and 10,816 controls from six cohorts. Methods: SNP markers localized to each of four genes (GC, CYP24A1, CYP2R1, and DHCR7) previously associated with 25 (OH) D were genotyped and examined both individually and as a 4-SNP polygenic score. Logistic regression was used to estimate the associations between the genetic variants and risk of breast cancer. Results: We found no association between any of the four SNPs or their polygenic score and breast cancer risk. Conclusions: Our findings do not support an association between vitamin D status, as reflected by 25(OH) D-related genotypes, and breast cancer risk. Impact: These findings may contribute to future meta-analyses and scientific review articles, and provide new data about the association between vitamin D-related genes and breast cancer.</p>
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2.
  • Markt, Sarah C., et al. (författare)
  • ABO Blood Group Alleles and Prostate Cancer Risk : results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The Prostate. - John Wiley & Sons. - 0270-4137 .- 1097-0045. ; 75:15, s. 1677-1681
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>BACKGROUND. ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney, and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer. METHODS. We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype, and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score &gt;= 8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1). RESULTS. We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.87-1.08; Type B: OR = 0.92, 95% CI = n0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between "dose" of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS. ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Prostate 75: 1677-1681, 2015. (C) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.</p>
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3.
  • Markt, Sarah C, et al. (författare)
  • ABO blood group alleles and prostate cancer risk Results from the breast and prostate cancer cohort consortium (BPC3)
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The Prostate. - 0270-4137 .- 1097-0045. ; 75:15, s. 1677-81
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>BACKGROUND:</strong> ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney, and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer.</p><p><strong>METHODS:</strong> We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype, and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1).</p><p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.87-1.08; Type B: OR = 0.92, 95%CI =n0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR = 1.25, 95%CI = 0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between "dose" of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk.</p><p><strong>CONCLUSIONS:</strong> ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer.</p>
4.
  • Shui, Irene M, et al. (författare)
  • Genetic variation in the toll-like receptor 4 and prostate cancer incidence and mortality
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: The Prostate. - Wiley-Blackwell. - 0270-4137 .- 1097-0045. ; 72:2, s. 209-216
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>BACKGROUND:</strong> Common genetic variants in the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which is involved in inflammation and immune response pathways, may be important for prostate cancer.</p><p><strong>METHODS:</strong> In a large nested case-control study of prostate cancer in the Physicians' Health Study (1982-2004), 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected and genotyped to capture common variation within the TLR4 gene as well as 5 kb up and downstream. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess associations of these SNPs with total prostate cancer incidence, and with prostate cancers defined as advanced stage/lethal (T3/T4, M1/N1(T1-T4), lethal) or high Gleason grade (7 (4 + 3) or greater). Cox-proportional hazards regression was used to assess progression to metastases and death among prostate cancer cases.</p><p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> The study included 1,267 controls and 1,286 incident prostate cancer cases, including 248 advanced stage/lethal and 306 high grade cases. During a median follow-up of 10.6 years, 183 men died of prostate cancer or developed distant metastases. No statistically significant associations between the TLR4 SNPs were found for total prostate cancer incidence, including SNPs for which an association was reported in other published studies. Additionally, there were no significant associations with TLR4 SNPS and the incidence of advanced stage/lethal, or high grade cancers; nor was there evidence among prostate cancer cases for associations of TLR4 SNPs with progression to prostate cancer specific mortality or bony metastases.</p><p><strong>CONCLUSIONS:</strong> Results from this prospective nested case-control study suggest that genetic variation across TLR4 alone is not strongly associated with prostate cancer risk or mortality.</p>
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5.
  • Barrdahl, Myrto, et al. (författare)
  • Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - Wiley-Blackwell. - 0020-7136 .- 1097-0215. ; 137:12, s. 2837-2845
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed <em>in silico</em> analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of <em>LSP1</em>-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HR<sub>per-allele</sub>=0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; <em>p</em><sub>trend</sub>=2.84 x 10<sup>-4</sup>; HR<sub>heterozygotes</sub>=0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HR<sub>homozygotes</sub>=0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; <em>p</em><sub>2DF</sub>=1.45 x 10<sup>-3</sup>). <em>In silico</em>, the C allele of <em>LSP1</em>-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (<em>CDKN1C</em>). In the meta-analysis, <em>TNRC9</em>-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HR<sub>META</sub> =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; <em>p</em><sub>trend</sub>=6.6 x 10<sup>-4</sup>; HR<sub>heterozygotes</sub>=0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HR<sub>homozygotes</sub>=1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; <em>p</em><sub>2DF</sub>=1.25 x 10<sup>-4</sup>). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of <em>LSP1</em>-rs3817198 and <em>TNRC9</em>-rs3803662.</p><p>What's new? Genetic factors are known to influence the risk of breast cancer, but inherited genetic variation may also affect disease prognosis and response to treatment. In this study, the we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are known to be associated with breast cancer risk might also influence the survival of breast-cancer patients. While two of the investigated SNPs may influence survival, there was otherwise no indication that SNP alleles related to breast cancer risk also play a role in the survival of breast cancer patients.</p>
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6.
  • Epstein, Mara M, et al. (författare)
  • Seasonal variation in expression of markers in the vitamin D pathway in prostate tissue
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer. - 0957-5243 .- 1573-7225. ; 23:8, s. 1359-1366
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>PURPOSE:</strong> Recent studies suggest variation in genes along the vitamin D pathway, as well as vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels, may be associated with prostate cancer. As serum vitamin D levels vary by season, we sought to determine whether the expression of genes on the vitamin D pathway, assessed in prostate tumor tissue, do the same.</p><p><strong>METHODS:</strong> Our study incorporates mRNA expression data from 362 men in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort, diagnosed between 1977 and 1999, and 106 men enrolled in the US Physicians' Health Study (PHS) diagnosed between 1983 and 2004. We also assayed for VDR protein expression among 832 men in the PHS and Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohorts. Season was characterized by date of initial tissue specimen collection categorically and by average monthly ultraviolet radiation levels. One-way analysis of variance was used to examine variation in the expression levels of six genes on the vitamin D pathway-VDR, GC, CYP27A1, CYP27B1, RXRα, CYP24A1-and VDR protein by season, adjusted for age at diagnosis and Gleason grade. Variation was also examined separately among lethal and nonlethal cases.</p><p><strong>RESULTS:</strong> Tumor expression levels of the six genes did not vary significantly by season of tissue collection. No consistent patterns emerged from subgroup analyses by lethal versus nonlethal cases.</p><p><strong>CONCLUSIONS:</strong> Unlike circulating levels of 25(OH) vitamin D, expression levels of genes on the vitamin D pathway and VDR protein did not vary overall by season of tissue collection. Epidemiological analyses of vitamin D gene expression may not be biased by seasonality.</p>
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7.
  • Shui, Irene M., et al. (författare)
  • Prostate Cancer (PCa) Risk Variants and Risk of Fatal PCa in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: European Urology. - 0302-2838 .- 1873-7560. ; 65:6, s. 1069-1075
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: Screening and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) is hampered by an inability to predict who has the potential to develop fatal disease and who has indolent cancer. Studies have identified multiple genetic risk loci for PCa incidence, but it is unknown whether they could be used as biomarkers for PCa-specific mortality (PCSM). Objective: To examine the association of 47 established PCa risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with PCSM. Design, setting, and participants: We included 10 487 men who had PCa and 11 024 controls, with a median follow-up of 8.3 yr, during which 1053 PCa deaths occurred. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The main outcome was PCSM. The risk allele was defined as the allele associated with an increased risk for PCa in the literature. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratios of each SNP with time to progression to PCSM after diagnosis. We also used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios for each risk SNP, comparing fatal PCa cases to controls. Results and limitations: Among the cases, we found that 8 of the 47 SNPs were significantly associated (p &lt; 0.05) with time to PCSM. The risk allele of rs11672691 (intergenic) was associated with an increased risk for PCSM, while 7 SNPs had risk alleles inversely associated (rs13385191 [C2orf43], rs17021918 [PDLIM5], rs10486567 [JAZF1], rs6465657 [LMTK2], rs7127900 (intergenic), rs2735839 [KLK3], rs10993994 [MSMB], rs13385191 [C2orf43]). In the case-control analysis, 22 SNPs were associated (p &lt; 0.05) with the risk of fatal PCa, but most did not differentiate between fatal and nonfatal PCa. Rs11672691 and rs10993994 were associated with both fatal and nonfatal PCa, while rs6465657, rs7127900, rs2735839, and rs13385191 were associated with nonfatal PCa only. Conclusions: Eight established risk loci were associated with progression to PCSM after diagnosis. Twenty-two SNPs were associated with fatal PCa incidence, but most did not differentiate between fatal and nonfatal PCa. The relatively small magnitudes of the associations do not translate well into risk prediction, but these findings merit further follow-up, because they may yield important clues about the complex biology of fatal PCa. Patient summary: In this report, we assessed whether established PCa risk variants could predict PCSM. We found eight risk variants associated with PCSM: One predicted an increased risk of PCSM, while seven were associated with decreased risk. Larger studies that focus on fatal PCa are needed to identify more markers that could aid prediction. (C) 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p>
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