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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Span Paul N.) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Span Paul N.)

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1.
  • Alexandrov, Ludmil B., et al. (författare)
  • Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Nature. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 0028-0836. ; 500:7463, s. 415-421
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, 'kataegis', is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.
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2.
  • Liu, Ning Qing, et al. (författare)
  • Comparative proteome analysis revealing an 11-protein signature for aggressive triple-negative breast cancer
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - : Oxford University Press. - 1460-2105. ; 106:2
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Clinical outcome of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly variable. This study aims to identify and validate a prognostic protein signature for TNBC patients to reduce unnecessary adjuvant systemic therapy.METHODS: Frozen primary tumors were collected from 126 lymph node-negative and adjuvant therapy-naive TNBC patients. These samples were used for global proteome profiling in two series: an in-house training (n = 63) and a multicenter test (n = 63) set. Patients who remained free of distant metastasis for a minimum of 5 years after surgery were defined as having good prognosis. Cox regression analysis was performed to develop a prognostic signature, which was independently validated. All statistical tests were two-sided.RESULTS: An 11-protein signature was developed in the training set (median follow-up for good-prognosis patients = 117 months) and subsequently validated in the test set (median follow-up for good-prognosis patients = 108 months) showing 89.5% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 69.2% to 98.1%), 70.5% specificity (95% CI = 61.7% to 74.2%), 56.7% positive predictive value (95% CI = 43.8% to 62.1%), and 93.9% negative predictive value (95% CI = 82.3% to 98.9%) for poor-prognosis patients. The predicted poor-prognosis patients had higher risk to develop distant metastasis than the predicted good-prognosis patients in univariate (hazard ratio [HR] = 13.15; 95% CI = 3.03 to 57.07; P = .001) and multivariable (HR = 12.45; 95% CI = 2.67 to 58.11; P = .001) analysis. Furthermore, the predicted poor-prognosis group had statistically significantly more breast cancer-specific mortality. Using our signature as guidance, more than 60% of patients would have been exempted from unnecessary adjuvant chemotherapy compared with conventional prognostic guidelines.CONCLUSIONS: We report the first validated proteomic signature to assess the natural course of clinical TNBC.
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3.
  • Davies, Helen R., et al. (författare)
  • HRDetect is a predictor of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deficiency based on mutational signatures
  • Ingår i: Nature Medicine. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1546-170X. ; 23:4, s. 517-525
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Approximately 1-5% of breast cancers are attributed to inherited mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and are selectively sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. In other cancer types, germline and/or somatic mutations in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) also confer selective sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Thus, assays to detect BRCA1/BRCA2-deficient tumors have been sought. Recently, somatic substitution, insertion/deletion and rearrangement patterns, or 'mutational signatures', were associated with BRCA1/BRCA2 dysfunction. Herein we used a lasso logistic regression model to identify six distinguishing mutational signatures predictive of BRCA1/BRCA2 deficiency. A weighted model called HRDetect was developed to accurately detect BRCA1/BRCA2-deficient samples. HRDetect identifies BRCA1/BRCA2-deficient tumors with 98.7% sensitivity (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.98). Application of this model in a cohort of 560 individuals with breast cancer, of whom 22 were known to carry a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, allowed us to identify an additional 22 tumors with somatic loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 and 47 tumors with functional BRCA1/BRCA2 deficiency where no mutation was detected. We validated HRDetect on independent cohorts of breast, ovarian and pancreatic cancers and demonstrated its efficacy in alternative sequencing strategies. Integrating all of the classes of mutational signatures thus reveals a larger proportion of individuals with breast cancer harboring BRCA1/BRCA2 deficiency (up to 22%) than hitherto appreciated (∼1-5%) who could have selective therapeutic sensitivity to PARP inhibition.
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4.
  • De Marchi, Tommaso, et al. (författare)
  • 4-protein signature predicting tamoxifen treatment outcome in recurrent breast cancer
  • Ingår i: Molecular Oncology. - : Elsevier. - 1574-7891. ; 10:1, s. 24-39
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Estrogen receptor (ER) positive tumors represent the majority of breast malignancies, and are effectively treated with hormonal therapies, such as tamoxifen. However, in the recurrent disease resistance to tamoxifen therapy is common and a major cause of death. In recent years, in-depth proteome analyses have enabled identification of clinically useful biomarkers, particularly, when heterogeneity in complex tumor tissue was reduced using laser capture microdissection (LCM). In the current study, we performed high resolution proteomic analysis on two cohorts of ER positive breast tumors derived from patients who either manifested good or poor outcome to tamoxifen treatment upon recurrence. A total of 112 fresh frozen tumors were collected from multiple medical centers and divided into two sets: an in-house training and a multi-center test set. Epithelial tumor cells were enriched with LCM and analyzed by nano-LC Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS), which yielded >3000 and >4000 quantified proteins in the training and test sets, respectively. Raw data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000484 and PXD000485. Statistical analysis showed differential abundance of 99 proteins, of which a subset of 4 proteins was selected through a multivariate step-down to develop a predictor for tamoxifen treatment outcome. The 4-protein signature significantly predicted poor outcome patients in the test set, independent of predictive histopathological characteristics (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15 to 4.17; multivariate Cox regression p value = 0.017). Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of PDCD4, one of the signature proteins, on an independent set of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues provided and independent technical validation (HR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.92; multivariate Cox regression p value = 0.009). We hereby report the first validated protein predictor for tamoxifen treatment outcome in recurrent ER-positive breast cancer. IHC further showed that PDCD4 is an independent marker.
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5.
  • De Marchi, Tommaso, et al. (författare)
  • Annexin-A1 and caldesmon are associated with resistance to tamoxifen in estrogen receptor positive recurrent breast cancer
  • Ingår i: Oncotarget. - : Impact Journals, LLC. - 1949-2553. ; 7:3, s. 3098-3110
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Tamoxifen therapy resistance constitutes a major cause of death in patients with recurrent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Through high resolution mass spectrometry (MS), we previously generated a 4-protein predictive signature for tamoxifen therapy outcome in recurrent breast cancer. ANXA1 and CALD1, which were not included in the classifier, were however the most differentially expressed proteins. We first evaluated the clinical relevance of these markers in our MS cohort, followed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining on an independent set of tumors incorporated in a tissue microarray (TMA) and regression analysis in relation to time to progression (TTP), clinical benefit and objective response. In order to assess which mechanisms ANXA1 and CALD1 might been involved in, we performed Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) on ANXA1 and CALD1 correlated proteins in our MS cohort. ANXA1 (Hazard ratio [HR] = 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-2.75; P = 0.003) and CALD1 (HR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.04-2.36; P = 0.039) based patient stratification showed significant association to TTP, while IHC staining on TMA showed that both ANXA1 (HR = 1.82; 95% CI: 1.12-3.00; P = 0.016) and CALD1 (HR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.40-3.75; P = 0.001) expression was associated with shorter TTP independently of traditional predictive factors. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the majority of proteins correlated to ANXA1 also correlated with CALD1. IPA indicated that ANXA1 and CALD1 were associated with ER-downregulation and NFκB signaling. We hereby report that ANXA1 and CALD1 proteins are independent markers for tamoxifen therapy outcome and are associated to fast tumor progression.
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6.
  • De Marchi, Tommaso, et al. (författare)
  • Targeted MS Assay Predicting Tamoxifen Resistance in Estrogen-Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Tissues and Sera
  • Ingår i: Journal of Proteome Research. - : The American Chemical Society (ACS). - 1535-3893. ; 15:4, s. 42-1230
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We recently reported on the development of a 4-protein-based classifier (PDCD4, CGN, G3BP2, and OCIAD1) capable of predicting outcome to tamoxifen treatment in recurrent, estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer based on high-resolution MS data. A precise and high-throughput assay to measure these proteins in a multiplexed, targeted fashion would be favorable to measure large numbers of patient samples to move these findings toward a clinical setting. By coupling immunoprecipitation to multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS and stable isotope dilution, we developed a high-precision assay to measure the 4-protein signature in 38 primary breast cancer whole tissue lysates (WTLs). Furthermore, we evaluated the presence and patient stratification capabilities of our signature in an independent set of 24 matched (pre- and post-therapy) sera. We compared the performance of immuno-MRM (iMRM) with direct MRM in the absence of fractionation and shotgun proteomics in combination with label-free quantification (LFQ) on both WTL and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues. Measurement of the 4-proteins by iMRM showed not only higher accuracy in measuring proteotypic peptides (Spearman r: 0.74 to 0.93) when compared with MRM (Spearman r: 0.0 to 0.76) but also significantly discriminated patient groups based on treatment outcome (hazard ratio [HR]: 10.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.33 to 27.76; Log-rank P < 0.001) when compared with LCM (HR: 2.85; 95% CI: 1.24 to 6.54; Log-rank P = 0.013) and WTL (HR: 1.16; 95% CI: 0.57 to 2.33; Log-rank P = 0.680) LFQ-based predictors. Serum sample analysis by iMRM confirmed the detection of the four proteins in these samples. We hereby report that iMRM outperformed regular MRM, confirmed our previous high-resolution MS results in tumor tissues, and has shown that the 4-protein signature is measurable in serum samples.
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7.
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8.
  • Glodzik, Dominik, et al. (författare)
  • Mutational mechanisms of amplifications revealed by analysis of clustered rearrangements in breast cancers
  • Ingår i: Annals of Oncology. - : Oxford University Press. - 1569-8041.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BackgroundComplex clusters of rearrangements are a challenge in interpretation of cancer genomes. Some clusters of rearrangements demarcate clear amplifications of driver oncogenes but others are less well understood. A detailed analysis of rearrangements within these complex clusters could reveal new insights into selection and underlying mutational mechanisms.Patients and methodsHere, we systematically investigate rearrangements that are densely clustered in individual tumours in a cohort of 560 breast cancers. Applying an agnostic approach, we identify 21 hotspots where clustered rearrangements recur across cancers.ResultsSome hotspots coincide with known oncogene loci including CCND1, ERBB2, ZNF217, chr8:ZNF703/FGFR1, IGF1R, and MYC. Others contain cancer genes not typically associated with breast cancer: MCL1, PTP4A1, and MYB. Intriguingly, we identify clustered rearrangements that physically connect distant hotspots. In particular, we observe simultaneous amplification of chr8:ZNF703/FGFR1 and chr11:CCND1 where deep analysis reveals that a chr8–chr11 translocation is likely to be an early, critical, initiating event.ConclusionsWe present an overview of complex rearrangements in breast cancer, highlighting a potential new way for detecting drivers and revealing novel mechanistic insights into the formation of two common amplicons.
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9.
  • Ju, Young Seok, et al. (författare)
  • Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Genome Research. - : Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press (CSHL). - 1549-5469. ; 25:6, s. 814-824
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells.
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10.
  • Ju, Young Seok, et al. (författare)
  • Somatic mutations reveal asymmetric cellular dynamics in the early human embryo
  • Ingår i: Nature. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 0028-0836. ; 543:7647, s. 714-718
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Somatic cells acquire mutations throughout the course of an individual's life. Mutations occurring early in embryogenesis are often present in a substantial proportion of, but not all, cells in postnatal humans and thus have particular characteristics and effects. Depending on their location in the genome and the proportion of cells they are present in, these mosaic mutations can cause a wide range of genetic disease syndromes and predispose carriers to cancer. They have a high chance of being transmitted to offspring as de novo germline mutations and, in principle, can provide insights into early human embryonic cell lineages and their contributions to adult tissues. Although it is known that gross chromosomal abnormalities are remarkably common in early human embryos, our understanding of early embryonic somatic mutations is very limited. Here we use whole-genome sequences of normal blood from 241 adults to identify 163 early embryonic mutations. We estimate that approximately three base substitution mutations occur per cell per cell-doubling event in early human embryogenesis and these are mainly attributable to two known mutational signatures. We used the mutations to reconstruct developmental lineages of adult cells and demonstrate that the two daughter cells of many early embryonic cell-doubling events contribute asymmetrically to adult blood at an approximately 2:1 ratio. This study therefore provides insights into the mutation rates, mutational processes and developmental outcomes of cell dynamics that operate during early human embryogenesis.
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