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Sökning: WFRF:(Sud Amit)

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1.
  • Went, Molly, et al. (författare)
  • Author Correction: Identification of multiple risk loci and regulatory mechanisms influencing susceptibility to multiple myeloma
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Nature communications. - 2041-1723. ; 10:1, s. 213
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The original version of this Article contained an error in the spelling of a member of the PRACTICAL Consortium, Manuela Gago-Dominguez, which was incorrectly given as Manuela Gago Dominguez. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article. Furthermore, in the original HTML version of this Article, the order of authors within the author list was incorrect. The PRACTICAL consortium was incorrectly listed after Richard S. Houlston and should have been listed after Nora Pashayan. This error has been corrected in the HTML version of the Article; the PDF version was correct at the time of publication.
2.
  • Went, Molly, et al. (författare)
  • Genetic correlation between multiple myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia provides evidence for shared aetiology
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Blood Cancer Journal. - Nature Publishing Group. - 2044-5385. ; 9:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The clustering of different types of B-cell malignancies in families raises the possibility of shared aetiology. To examine this, we performed cross-trait linkage disequilibrium (LD)-score regression of multiple myeloma (MM) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) genome-wide association study (GWAS) data sets, totalling 11,734 cases and 29,468 controls. A significant genetic correlation between these two B-cell malignancies was shown (Rg = 0.4, P = 0.0046). Furthermore, four of the 45 known CLL risk loci were shown to associate with MM risk and five of the 23 known MM risk loci associate with CLL risk. By integrating eQTL, Hi-C and ChIP-seq data, we show that these pleiotropic risk loci are enriched for B-cell regulatory elements and implicate B-cell developmental genes. These data identify shared biological pathways influencing the development of CLL and, MM and further our understanding of the aetiological basis of these B-cell malignancies.
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4.
  • Chattopadhyay, Subhayan, et al. (författare)
  • Risk of second primary cancer following myeloid neoplasia and risk of myeloid neoplasia as second primary cancer : a nationwide, observational follow up study in Sweden
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: The Lancet Haematology. - Elsevier. - 2352-3026. ; 5:8, s. 368-377
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Although advances in the treatment of myeloid neoplasms have led to improved patient survival, this improvement has been accompanied by an increased risk of second primary cancer (ie, the risk of another cancer after myeloid neoplasia). We aimed to assess bi-directional associations between myeloid cancers and other cancers—ie, development of second primary cancer in patients who have previously had myeloid cancer, and risks of myeloid neoplasia in patients who have previously had another cancer—to provide insight into possible mechanisms beyond side-effects of treatment and shared risk factors. Methods: Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified 35 928 individuals with primary myeloid cancer, including myeloproliferative neoplasms, acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome diagnosed between 1958 and 2015. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes every individual registered as a resident in Sweden starting in 1932, with full parental history. The primary endpoint was the assessment of relative risks (RRs) for second primary cancer, which we performed using means of incidence rate ratios, regressed over a generalised Poisson model. Findings: Between 1958 and 2015, overall relative risk of second primary cancers was significantly increased after acute myeloid leukaemia (RR 1·29, 95% CI 1·17–1·41), chronic myeloid leukaemia (1·52, 1·35–1·69), myelodysplastic syndrome (1·42, 1·26–1·59), and all myeloproliferative neoplasms (1·37, 1·30–1·43) relative to the incidence of these cancers as first primary cancer. With myeloid neoplasia as a second primary cancer, risks were significantly increased for acute myeloid leukaemia (1·57, 1·48–1·65), chronic myeloid leukaemia (1·26, 1·13–1·40), and myelodysplastic syndrome (1·54, 1·42–1·67) relative to the incidence of these myeloid neoplasms as first primary cancers. Relative risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancer, squamous cell skin cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma as second primary cancers were increased after all four types of myeloid neoplasia relative to their incidence as first primary cancers. High risks of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia as second primary cancers were found after haematological cancers (RRs between 5·08 and 10·04). Interpretation: The relative risks of second primary cancer are important for the long-term management of patients with myeloid cancers. The bi-directional associations of myeloid cancers with many other cancers suggest a number of candidate mechanisms that might contribute to the development and aetiology of a second primary cancer. These mechanisms might include immune dysfunction or the effects of treatment, and these should be assessed in future investigations. Funding: Deutsche Krebshilfe, Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation, Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Finnish Cancer Organizations, Swedish Research Council, ALF from Region Skåne, and Bloodwise.
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5.
  • Chattopadhyay, Subhayan, et al. (författare)
  • Second primary cancers in non-Hodgkin lymphoma : Bidirectional analyses suggesting role for immune dysfunction
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0020-7136. ; 143:10, s. 2449-2457
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Second primary cancers (SPCs) account for an increasing proportion of all cancer diagnoses. It is unlikely that prior therapy is solely responsible for SPC risk. To investigate risk of SPC after diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and 10 of its subtypes we conducted a novel bidirectional analysis, SPCs after NHL and NHL as SPC. Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified 19,833 individuals with primary NHL diagnosed between 1993 and 2015. We calculated relative risks (RRs) of SPCs in NHL survivors and, for bi-directional analysis, risk of NHL as SPC. The overall RRs were significantly bidirectionally increased for NHL and 7 cancers. After diagnosis of NHL risks were increased for upper aerodigestive tract (RR = 1.96), colorectal (1.35), kidney (3.10), bladder (1.54) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCC) (4.12), melanoma (1.98) and Hodgkin lymphoma (9.38). The concordance between RRs for each bidirectional association between NHL and 31 different cancers was highly significant (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001). Melanoma was bidirectionally associated with all 10 subtypes of NHL. The observed bidirectional associations between NHL and cancer suggest that therapy-related carcinogenic mechanisms cannot solely explain the findings. Considering that skin SCC and melanoma are usually treated by surgery and that these cancers and NHL are most responsive of any cancer to immune suppression, the consistent bidirectional results provide population-level evidence that immune suppressed state is a key underlying mechanism in the context of SPCs. Furthermore, the quantified risks for NHL subtypes have direct clinical application in the management of NHL patients.
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6.
  • Chattopadhyay, Subhayan, et al. (författare)
  • Second primary cancers in non-Hodgkin lymphoma : Family history and survival
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0020-7136. ; 146:4, s. 970-976
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Second primary cancers (SPCs) account for an increasing proportion of all cancer diagnoses and family history of cancer may be a risk factor for SPCs. Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we assessed the influence of family history on risk of SPCs and of SPCs on survival. NHL patients were identified from the years 1958 to 2015 and generalized Poisson models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs) for SPCs and familial SPCs. Among 14,393 NHL patients, a total of 1,866 (13.0%) were diagnosed with SPC. Familial risk of nine particular cancers was associated with risks of these cancers as SPCs, with twofold to fivefold increase in RRs. At the end of a 25-year follow-up period, the survival probability for persons with SPC was only 20% of that for patients without SPC; the hazard ratio for SPC was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.46–1.72). Survival could be predicted by the prognostic groups based on first cancers and HRs increase systematically with worse prognosis yielding a trend of p = 4.6 × 10 −5 . SPCs had deleterious consequences for survival in NHL patients. Family history was associated with increasing numbers of SPCs. Prevention of SPCs and their early detection is an important target in the overall strategy to improve survival in NHL patients. Counseling for avoidance of risk factors and targeted screening based on family history are feasible steps in risk reduction.
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7.
  • Disney-Hogg, Linden, et al. (författare)
  • Impact of atopy on risk of glioma a Mendelian randomisation study
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: BMC Medicine. - BioMed Central. - 1741-7015 .- 1741-7015. ; 16
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Background: An inverse relationship between allergies with glioma risk has been reported in several but not all epidemiological observational studies. We performed an analysis of genetic variants associated with atopy to assess the relationship with glioma risk using Mendelian randomisation (MR), an approach unaffected by biases from temporal variability and reverse causation that might have affected earlier investigations.</p><p>Methods: Two-sample MR was undertaken using genome-wide association study data. We used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with atopic dermatitis, asthma and hay fever, IgE levels, and self-reported allergy as instrumental variables. We calculated MR estimates for the odds ratio (OR) for each risk factor with glioma using SNP-glioma estimates from 12,488 cases and 18,169 controls, using inverse-variance weighting (IVW), maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), weighted median estimate (WME) and mode-based estimate (MBE) methods. Violation of MR assumptions due to directional pleiotropy were sought using MR-Egger regression and HEIDI-outlier analysis.</p><p>Results: Under IVW, MLE, WME and MBE methods, associations between glioma risk with asthma and hay fever, self-reported allergy and IgE levels were non-significant. An inverse relationship between atopic dermatitis and glioma risk was found by IVW (OR 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.00, P = 0.041) and MLE (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.99, P = 0.003), but not by WME (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.91-1.01, P = 0.114) or MBE (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.92-1.02, P = 0.194).</p><p>Conclusions: Our investigation does not provide strong evidence for relationship between atopy and the risk of developing glioma, but findings do not preclude a small effect in relation to atopic dermatitis. Our analysis also serves to illustrate the value of using several MR methods to derive robust conclusions.</p>
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8.
  • Disney-Hogg, Linden, et al. (författare)
  • Influence of obesity-related risk factors in the aetiology of glioma
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Cancer. - Nature Publishing Group. - 0007-0920 .- 1532-1827. ; 118:7, s. 1020-1027
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>BACKGROUND: Obesity and related factors have been implicated as possible aetiological factors for the development of glioma in epidemiological observation studies. We used genetic markers in a Mendelian randomisation framework to examine whether obesity-related traits influence glioma risk. This methodology reduces bias from confounding and is not affected by reverse causation. METHODS: Genetic instruments were identified for 10 key obesity-related risk factors, and their association with glioma risk was evaluated using data from a genome-wide association study of 12,488 glioma patients and 18,169 controls. The estimated odds ratio of glioma associated with each of the genetically defined obesity-related traits was used to infer evidence for a causal relationship. RESULTS: No convincing association with glioma risk was seen for genetic instruments for body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, lipids, type-2 diabetes, hyperglycaemia or insulin resistance. Similarly, we found no evidence to support a relationship between obesity-related traits with subtypes of glioma-glioblastoma (GBM) or non-GBM tumours. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides no evidence to implicate obesity-related factors as causes of glioma.</p>
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9.
  • Law, Philip J., et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide association analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma identifies pleiotropic risk loci
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Scientific Reports. - Nature Publishing Group. - 2045-2322. ; 7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • B-cell malignancies (BCM) originate from the same cell of origin, but at different maturation stages and have distinct clinical phenotypes. Although genetic risk variants for individual BCMs have been identified, an agnostic, genome-wide search for shared genetic susceptibility has not been performed. We explored genome-wide association studies of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL, N = 1,842), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, N = 1,465) and multiple myeloma (MM, N = 3,790). We identified a novel pleiotropic risk locus at 3q22.2 (NCK1, rs11715604, P = 1.60 × 10-9) with opposing effects between CLL (P = 1.97 × 10-8) and HL (P = 3.31 × 10-3). Eight established non-HLA risk loci showed pleiotropic associations. Within the HLA region, Ser37 + Phe37 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 1.84 × 10-12) was associated with increased CLL and HL risk (P = 4.68 × 10-12), and reduced MM risk (P = 1.12 × 10-2), and Gly70 in HLA-DQB1 (P = 3.15 × 10-10) showed opposing effects between CLL (P = 3.52 × 10-3) and HL (P = 3.41 × 10-9). By integrating eQTL, Hi-C and ChIP-seq data, we show that the pleiotropic risk loci are enriched for B-cell regulatory elements, as well as an over-representation of binding of key B-cell transcription factors. These data identify shared biological pathways influencing the development of CLL, HL and MM. The identification of these risk loci furthers our understanding of the aetiological basis of BCMs.
10.
  • Li, Ni L., et al. (författare)
  • Genetic Predisposition to Multiple Myeloma at 5q15 Is Mediated by an ELL2 Enhancer Polymorphism
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Cell Reports. - Cell Press. - 2211-1247. ; 20:11, s. 2556-2564
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells. Genome-wide association studies have shown that variation at 5q15 influences MM risk. Here, we have sought to decipher the causal variant at 5q15 and the mechanism by which it influences tumorigenesis. We show that rs6877329 G > C resides in a predicted enhancer element that physically interacts with the transcription start site of ELL2. The rs6877329-C risk allele is associated with reduced enhancer activity and lowered ELL2 expression. Since ELL2 is critical to the B cell differentiation process, reduced ELL2 expression is consistent with inherited genetic variation contributing to arrest of plasma cell development, facilitating MM clonal expansion. These data provide evidence for a biological mechanism underlying a hereditary risk of MM at 5q15.
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