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Sökning: WFRF:(Talala Kirsi)

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1.
  • Hugosson, Jonas, 1955, et al. (författare)
  • A 16-yr Follow-up of the European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: European Urology. - : Elsevier. - 0302-2838. ; 76:1, s. 43-51
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) has previously demonstrated that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening decreases prostate cancer (PCa) mortality. Objective: To determine whether PSA screening decreases PCa mortality for up to 16 yr and to assess results following adjustment for nonparticipation and the number of screening rounds attended. Design, setting, and participants: This multicentre population-based randomised screening trial was conducted in eight European countries. Report includes 182 160 men, followed up until 2014 (maximum of 16 yr), with a predefined core age group of 162 389 men (55-69 yr), selected from population registry. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The outcome was PCa mortality, also assessed with adjustment for nonparticipation and the number of screening rounds attended. Results and limitations: The rate ratio of PCa mortality was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-0.89, p < 0.001) at 16 yr. The difference in absolute PCa mortality increased from 0.14% at 13 yr to 0.18% at 16 yr. The number of men needed to be invited for screening to prevent one PCa death was 570 at 16 yr compared with 742 at 13 yr. The number needed to diagnose was reduced to 18 from 26 at 13 yr. Men with PCa detected during the first round had a higher prevalence of PSA >20 ng/ml (9.9% compared with 4.1% in the second round, p < 0.001) and higher PCa mortality (hazard ratio = 1.86, p < 0.001) than those detected subsequently. Conclusions: Findings corroborate earlier results that PSA screening significantly reduces PCa mortality, showing larger absolute benefit with longer follow-up and a reduction in excess incidence. Repeated screening may be important to reduce PCa mortality on a population level. Patient summary: In this report, we looked at the outcomes from prostate cancer in a large European population. We found that repeated screening reduces the risk of dying from prostate cancer. (C) 2019 Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of European Association of Urology.
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2.
  • Assel, Melissa, et al. (författare)
  • A Four-kallikrein Panel and β-Microseminoprotein in Predicting High-grade Prostate Cancer on Biopsy : An Independent Replication from the Finnish Section of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer
  • Ingår i: European Urology Focus. - : Elsevier. - 2405-4569. ; 5:4, s. 561-567
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: A panel of four kallikrein markers (total, free, and intact prostate-specific antigen [PSA] and human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 [hK2]) improves predictive accuracy for Gleason score ≥7 (high-grade) prostate cancer among men biopsied for elevated PSA. A four-kallikrein panel model was originally developed and validated by the Dutch center of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). The kallikrein panel is now commercially available as 4Kscore™. Objective: To assess whether these findings could be replicated among participants in the Finnish section of ERSPC (FinRSPC) and whether β-microseminoprotein (MSP), a candidate prostate cancer biomarker, adds predictive value. Design, setting, and participants: Among 4861 biopsied screening-positive participants in the first three screening rounds of FinRSPC, a case-control subset was selected that included 1632 biopsy-positive cases matched by age at biopsy to biopsy-negative controls. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The predictive accuracy of prespecified prediction models was compared with biopsy outcomes. Results and limitations: Among men with PSA of 4.0-25. ng/ml, 1111 had prostate cancer, 318 of whom had high-grade disease. Total PSA and age predicted high-grade cancer with an area under the curve of 0.648 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.614-0.681) and the four-kallikrein panel increased discrimination to 0.746 (95% CI 0.717-0.774). Adding MSP to the four-kallikrein panel led to a significant (Wald test; p = 0.015) but small increase (0.003) in discrimination. Limitations include a risk of verification bias among men with PSA of 3.0-3.99. ng/ml and the absence of digital rectal examination results. Conclusions: These findings provide additional evidence that kallikrein markers can be used to inform biopsy decision-making. Further studies are needed to define the role of MSP. Patient summary: Four kallikrein markers and β-microseminoprotein in blood improve discrimination of high-grade prostate cancer at biopsy in men with elevated prostate-specific antigen. Four kallikrein markers and β-microseminoprotein (MSP) in blood improve discrimination of high-grade cancer at biopsy in men with elevated prostate-specific antigen. These kallikrein markers can be used to inform biopsy decision-making. Further studies are needed to define the role of MSP.
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4.
  • Saarimäki, Lasse, et al. (författare)
  • Impact of Prostatic-specific Antigen Threshold and Screening Interval in Prostate Cancer Screening Outcomes: Comparing the Swedish and Finnish European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer Centres.
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: European urology focus. - 2405-4569. ; 5:2, s. 186-191
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer trial has shown a 21% reduction in prostate cancer (PC) mortality with prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening. Sweden used a 2-yr screening interval and showed a larger mortality reduction than Finland with a 4-yr interval and higher PSA cut-off.To evaluate the impact of screening interval and PSA cut-off on PC detection and mortality.We analysed the core age groups (55-69 yr at entry) of the Finnish (N=31 866) and Swedish (N=5901) screening arms at 13 yr and 16 yr of follow-up. Sweden used a screening interval of 2 yr and a PSA cut-off of 3.0ng/ml, while in Finland the screening interval was 4 yr and the PSA cut-off 4.0ng/ml (or PSA 3.0-3.9ng/ml with free PSA<16%).We compared PC detection rate and PC mortality between the Finnish and Swedish centres and estimated the impact of different screening protocols.If the Swedish screening protocol had been followed in Finland, 122 additional PC cases would have been diagnosed at screening, 84% of which would have been low-risk cancers, and four leading to PC death. In contrast, if a lower PSA threshold had been applied in Finland, at least 127 additional PC would have been found, with 19 PC deaths.The small number of deaths among cases that would have been potentially detectable in Finland with the Swedish protocol (or those that would have been missed in Sweden with the Finnish approach) is unlikely to explain the differences in mortality in this long of a follow-up.A prostate-specific antigen threshold of 3ng/ml versus 4ng/ml or a screening interval of 2 yr instead of 4 yr is unlikely to explain the larger mortality reduction achieved in Sweden compared with Finland.
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5.
  • Stenman, Ulf-Håkan, et al. (författare)
  • What explains the differences between centres in the European screening trial? A simulation study.
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Cancer epidemiology. - 1877-783X. ; 46, s. 14-19
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The European Randomised study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) is a multicentre, randomised screening trial on men aged 55-69 years at baseline without known prostate cancer (PrCa) at randomisation to an intervention arm invited to screening or to a control arm. The ERSPC has shown a significant 21% reduction in PrCa mortality at 13 years of follow-up. The effect of screening appears to vary across centres, for which several explanations are possible. We set to assess if the apparent differences in PrCa mortality reduction between the centres can be explained by differences in screening protocols.We examined the centre differences by developing a simulation model and estimated how alternative screening protocols would have affected PrCa mortality.Our results showed outcomes similar to those observed, when the results by centres were reproduced by simulating the screening regimens with PSA threshold of 3 versus 4ng/ml, or screening interval of two versus four years. The findings suggest that the differences are only marginally attributable to the different screening protocols.The small screening impact in Finland was not explained by the differences in the screening protocols. A possible reason for it was the contamination of and the unexpectedly low PrCa mortality in the Finnish control arm.
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