SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Tura Andrea) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Tura Andrea)

  • Resultat 1-10 av 25
  • [1]23Nästa
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  • Alsalim, Wathik, et al. (författare)
  • Effect of single-dose DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on β-cell function and incretin hormone secretion after meal ingestion in healthy volunteers and drug-naïve, well-controlled type 2 diabetes subjects
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 1462-8902. ; 20:4, s. 1080-1085
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To explore the effects of a single dose of the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on glucose-standardized insulin secretion and β-cell glucose sensitivity after meal ingestion, 12 healthy and 12 drug-naïve, well-controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects (mean HbA1c 43mmol/mol, 6.2%) received sitagliptin (100mg) or placebo before a meal (525kcal). β-cell function was measured as the insulin secretory rate at a standardized glucose concentration and the β-cell glucose sensitivity (the slope between glucose and insulin secretory rate). Incretin levels were also monitored. Sitagliptin increased standardized insulin secretion, in both healthy and T2D subjects, compared to placebo, but without increasing β-cell glucose sensitivity. Sitagliptin also increased active glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and reduced total (reflecting the secretion) GIP, but not total GLP-1 levels. We conclude that a single dose of DPP-4 inhibition induces dissociated effects on different aspects of β-cell function and incretin hormones after meal ingestion in both healthy and well-controlled T2D subjects.
  •  
2.
  •  
3.
  • Alsalim, Wathik, et al. (författare)
  • Persistent whole day meal effects of three dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors on glycaemia and hormonal responses in metformin-treated type 2 diabetes
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 1462-8902. ; 22:4, s. 590-598
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aim: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibition has effects on both fasting and postprandial glucose. However, the extent of this effect over the whole day and whether different DPP-4 inhibitors have the same effects have not been established. We therefore explored the whole day effects of three different DPP-4 inhibitors versus placebo on glucose, islet and incretin hormones after ingestion of breakfast, lunch and dinner in subjects with metformin-treated and well-controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods: The study was single-centre and crossover designed, involving 24 subjects [12 men, 12 women, mean age 63 years, body mass index 31.0 kg/m2, glycated haemoglobin 44.7 mmol/mol (6.2%)], who underwent four test days in random order. Each whole day test included ingestion of standardized breakfast (525 kcal), lunch (780 kcal) and dinner (560 kcal) after intake of sitagliptin (100 mg) or vildagliptin (50 mg twice), or saxagliptin (5 mg) or placebo. Results: Compared with placebo, DPP-4 inhibition reduced glucose levels, increased beta-cell function (insulin secretory rate in relation to glucose), suppressed glucagon, increased intact glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) but suppressed total GLP-1 and GIP after all three meals. The effects were sustained throughout the daytime period with similar changes after each meal and did not differ between the DPP-4 inhibitors. Conclusions: DPP-4 inhibition has persistent daytime effects on glucose, islet and incretin hormones with no difference between three different DPP-4 inhibitors.
  •  
4.
  • Bizzotto, Roberto, et al. (författare)
  • Processes Underlying Glycemic Deterioration in Type 2 Diabetes : An IMI DIRECT Study
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Diabetes Care. - : American Diabetes Association. - 1935-5548 .- 0149-5992. ; 44:2, s. 511-518
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: We investigated the processes underlying glycemic deterioration in type 2 diabetes (T2D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 732 recently diagnosed patients with T2D from the Innovative Medicines Initiative Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (IMI DIRECT) study were extensively phenotyped over 3 years, including measures of insulin sensitivity (OGIS), β-cell glucose sensitivity (GS), and insulin clearance (CLIm) from mixed meal tests, liver enzymes, lipid profiles, and baseline regional fat from MRI. The associations between the longitudinal metabolic patterns and HbA1c deterioration, adjusted for changes in BMI and in diabetes medications, were assessed via stepwise multivariable linear and logistic regression. RESULTS: Faster HbA1c progression was independently associated with faster deterioration of OGIS and GS and increasing CLIm; visceral or liver fat, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides had further independent, though weaker, roles (R2 = 0.38). A subgroup of patients with a markedly higher progression rate (fast progressors) was clearly distinguishable considering these variables only (discrimination capacity from area under the receiver operating characteristic = 0.94). The proportion of fast progressors was reduced from 56% to 8-10% in subgroups in which only one trait among OGIS, GS, and CLIm was relatively stable (odds ratios 0.07-0.09). T2D polygenic risk score and baseline pancreatic fat, glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon, diet, and physical activity did not show an independent role. CONCLUSIONS: Deteriorating insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, increasing insulin clearance, high visceral or liver fat, and worsening of the lipid profile are the crucial factors mediating glycemic deterioration of patients with T2D in the initial phase of the disease. Stabilization of a single trait among insulin sensitivity, β-cell function, and insulin clearance may be relevant to prevent progression.
  •  
5.
  • Deshmukh, Harshal A., et al. (författare)
  • Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Glucose Sensitivity
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism. - : Oxford University Press. - 1945-7197 .- 0021-972X. ; 106:1, s. 80-90
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • CONTEXT: Pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity is the slope of the plasma glucose-insulin secretion relationship and is a key predictor of deteriorating glucose tolerance and development of type 2 diabetes. However, there are no large-scale studies looking at the genetic determinants of beta-cell glucose sensitivity. OBJECTIVE: To understand the genetic determinants of pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity using genome-wide meta-analysis and candidate gene studies. DESIGN: We performed a genome-wide meta-analysis for beta-cell glucose sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes and nondiabetic subjects from 6 independent cohorts (n = 5706). Beta-cell glucose sensitivity was calculated from mixed meal and oral glucose tolerance tests, and its associations between known glycemia-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide association study (GWAS) SNPs were estimated using linear regression models. RESULTS: Beta-cell glucose sensitivity was moderately heritable (h2 ranged from 34% to 55%) using SNP and family-based analyses. GWAS meta-analysis identified multiple correlated SNPs in the CDKAL1 gene and GIPR-QPCTL gene loci that reached genome-wide significance, with SNP rs2238691 in GIPR-QPCTL (P value = 2.64 × 10-9) and rs9368219 in the CDKAL1 (P value = 3.15 × 10-9) showing the strongest association with beta-cell glucose sensitivity. These loci surpassed genome-wide significance when the GWAS meta-analysis was repeated after exclusion of the diabetic subjects. After correction for multiple testing, glycemia-associated SNPs in or near the HHEX and IGF2B2 loci were also associated with beta-cell glucose sensitivity. CONCLUSION: We show that, variation at the GIPR-QPCTL and CDKAL1 loci are key determinants of pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity.
  •  
6.
  • Forouzanfar, Mohammad H., et al. (författare)
  • Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2015 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - : Elsevier. - 0140-6736 .- 1474-547X. ; 388:10053, s. 1659-1724
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 provides an up-to-date synthesis of the evidence for risk factor exposure and the attributable burden of disease. By providing national and subnational assessments spanning the past 25 years, this study can inform debates on the importance of addressing risks in context. Methods We used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of the Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate attributable deaths, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and trends in exposure by age group, sex, year, and geography for 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks from 1990 to 2015. This study included 388 risk-outcome pairs that met World Cancer Research Fund-defined criteria for convincing or probable evidence. We extracted relative risk and exposure estimates from randomised controlled trials, cohorts, pooled cohorts, household surveys, census data, satellite data, and other sources. We used statistical models to pool data, adjust for bias, and incorporate covariates. We developed a metric that allows comparisons of exposure across risk factors-the summary exposure value. Using the counterfactual scenario of theoretical minimum risk level, we estimated the portion of deaths and DALYs that could be attributed to a given risk. We decomposed trends in attributable burden into contributions from population growth, population age structure, risk exposure, and risk-deleted cause-specific DALY rates. We characterised risk exposure in relation to a Socio-demographic Index (SDI). Findings Between 1990 and 2015, global exposure to unsafe sanitation, household air pollution, childhood underweight, childhood stunting, and smoking each decreased by more than 25%. Global exposure for several occupational risks, high body-mass index (BMI), and drug use increased by more than 25% over the same period. All risks jointly evaluated in 2015 accounted for 57.8% (95% CI 56.6-58.8) of global deaths and 41.2% (39.8-42.8) of DALYs. In 2015, the ten largest contributors to global DALYs among Level 3 risks were high systolic blood pressure (211.8 million [192.7 million to 231.1 million] global DALYs), smoking (148.6 million [134.2 million to 163.1 million]), high fasting plasma glucose (143.1 million [125.1 million to 163.5 million]), high BMI (120.1 million [83.8 million to 158.4 million]), childhood undernutrition (113.3 million [103.9 million to 123.4 million]), ambient particulate matter (103.1 million [90.8 million to 115.1 million]), high total cholesterol (88.7 million [74.6 million to 105.7 million]), household air pollution (85.6 million [66.7 million to 106.1 million]), alcohol use (85.0 million [77.2 million to 93.0 million]), and diets high in sodium (83.0 million [49.3 million to 127.5 million]). From 1990 to 2015, attributable DALYs declined for micronutrient deficiencies, childhood undernutrition, unsafe sanitation and water, and household air pollution; reductions in risk-deleted DALY rates rather than reductions in exposure drove these declines. Rising exposure contributed to notable increases in attributable DALYs from high BMI, high fasting plasma glucose, occupational carcinogens, and drug use. Environmental risks and childhood undernutrition declined steadily with SDI; low physical activity, high BMI, and high fasting plasma glucose increased with SDI. In 119 countries, metabolic risks, such as high BMI and fasting plasma glucose, contributed the most attributable DALYs in 2015. Regionally, smoking still ranked among the leading five risk factors for attributable DALYs in 109 countries; childhood underweight and unsafe sex remained primary drivers of early death and disability in much of sub-Saharan Africa. Interpretation Declines in some key environmental risks have contributed to declines in critical infectious diseases. Some risks appear to be invariant to SDI. Increasing risks, including high BMI, high fasting plasma glucose, drug use, and some occupational exposures, contribute to rising burden from some conditions, but also provide opportunities for intervention. Some highly preventable risks, such as smoking, remain major causes of attributable DALYs, even as exposure is declining. Public policy makers need to pay attention to the risks that are increasingly major contributors to global burden. Copyright (C) The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  •  
7.
  • Huhn, Evelyn Annegret, et al. (författare)
  • Effectiveness of real-time continuous glucose monitoring to improve glycaemic control and pregnancy outcome in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus : a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: BMJ Open. - : BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. - 2044-6055 .- 2044-6055. ; 10:11
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • INTRODUCTION: Real-time continuous glucose monitoring (rt-CGM) informs users about current interstitial glucose levels and allows early detection of glycaemic excursions and timely adaptation by behavioural change or pharmacological intervention. Randomised controlled studies adequately powered to evaluate the impact of long-term application of rt-CGM systems on the reduction of adverse obstetric outcomes in women with gestational diabetes (GDM) are missing. We aim to assess differences in the proportion of large for gestational age newborns in women using rt-CGM as compared with women with self-monitored blood glucose (primary outcome). Rates of neonatal hypoglycaemia, caesarean section and shoulder dystocia are secondary outcomes. A comparison of glucose metabolism and quality of life during and after pregnancy completes the scope of this study.METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Open-label multicentre randomised controlled trial with two parallel groups including 372 female patients with a recent diagnosis of GDM (between 24+0 until 31+6 weeks of gestation): 186 with rt-CGM (Dexcom G6) and 186 with self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG). Women with GDM will be consecutively recruited and randomised to rt-CGM or control (SMBG) group after a run-in period of 6-8 days. The third visit will be scheduled 8-10 days later and then every 2 weeks. At every visit, glucose measurements will be evaluated and all patients will be treated according to the standard care. The control group will receive a blinded CGM for 10 days between the second and third visit and between week 36+0 and 38+6. Cord blood will be sampled immediately after delivery. 48 hours after delivery neonatal biometry and maternal glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) will be assessed, and between weeks 8 and 16 after delivery all patients receive a re-examination of glucose metabolism including blinded CGM for 8-10 days.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study received ethical approval from the main ethic committee in Vienna. Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03981328; Pre-results.
  •  
8.
  • Kassebaum, Nicholas J., et al. (författare)
  • Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 315 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE), 1990-2015 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - : Elsevier. - 0140-6736 .- 1474-547X. ; 388:10053, s. 1603-1658
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Healthy life expectancy (HALE) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) provide summary measures of health across geographies and time that can inform assessments of epidemiological patterns and health system performance, help to prioritise investments in research and development, and monitor progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We aimed to provide updated HALE and DALYs for geographies worldwide and evaluate how disease burden changes with development. Methods We used results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015) for all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortality, and non-fatal disease burden to derive HALE and DALYs by sex for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. We calculated DALYs by summing years of life lost (YLLs) and years of life lived with disability (YLDs) for each geography, age group, sex, and year. We estimated HALE using the Sullivan method, which draws from age-specific death rates and YLDs per capita. We then assessed how observed levels of DALYs and HALE differed from expected trends calculated with the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator constructed from measures of income per capita, average years of schooling, and total fertility rate. Findings Total global DALYs remained largely unchanged from 1990 to 2015, with decreases in communicable, neonatal, maternal, and nutritional (Group 1) disease DALYs off set by increased DALYs due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Much of this epidemiological transition was caused by changes in population growth and ageing, but it was accelerated by widespread improvements in SDI that also correlated strongly with the increasing importance of NCDs. Both total DALYs and age-standardised DALY rates due to most Group 1 causes significantly decreased by 2015, and although total burden climbed for the majority of NCDs, age-standardised DALY rates due to NCDs declined. Nonetheless, age-standardised DALY rates due to several high-burden NCDs (including osteoarthritis, drug use disorders, depression, diabetes, congenital birth defects, and skin, oral, and sense organ diseases) either increased or remained unchanged, leading to increases in their relative ranking in many geographies. From 2005 to 2015, HALE at birth increased by an average of 2.9 years (95% uncertainty interval 2.9-3.0) for men and 3.5 years (3.4-3.7) for women, while HALE at age 65 years improved by 0.85 years (0.78-0.92) and 1.2 years (1.1-1.3), respectively. Rising SDI was associated with consistently higher HALE and a somewhat smaller proportion of life spent with functional health loss; however, rising SDI was related to increases in total disability. Many countries and territories in central America and eastern sub-Saharan Africa had increasingly lower rates of disease burden than expected given their SDI. At the same time, a subset of geographies recorded a growing gap between observed and expected levels of DALYs, a trend driven mainly by rising burden due to war, interpersonal violence, and various NCDs. Interpretation Health is improving globally, but this means more populations are spending more time with functional health loss, an absolute expansion of morbidity. The proportion of life spent in ill health decreases somewhat with increasing SDI, a relative compression of morbidity, which supports continued efforts to elevate personal income, improve education, and limit fertility. Our analysis of DALYs and HALE and their relationship to SDI represents a robust framework on which to benchmark geography-specific health performance and SDG progress. Country-specific drivers of disease burden, particularly for causes with higher-than-expected DALYs, should inform financial and research investments, prevention efforts, health policies, and health system improvement initiatives for all countries along the development continuum.
  •  
9.
  • Koivula, Robert W., et al. (författare)
  • Discovery of biomarkers for glycaemic deterioration before and after the onset of type 2 diabetes : descriptive characteristics of the epidemiological studies within the IMI DIRECT Consortium
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Diabetologia. - : Springer. - 0012-186X .- 1432-0428. ; 62:9, s. 1601-1615
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims/hypothesis: Here, we describe the characteristics of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (DIRECT) epidemiological cohorts at baseline and follow-up examinations (18, 36 and 48 months of follow-up).Methods: From a sampling frame of 24,682 adults of European ancestry enrolled in population-based cohorts across Europe, participants at varying risk of glycaemic deterioration were identified using a risk prediction algorithm (based on age, BMI, waist circumference, use of antihypertensive medication, smoking status and parental history of type 2 diabetes) and enrolled into a prospective cohort study (n = 2127) (cohort 1, prediabetes risk). We also recruited people from clinical registries with type 2 diabetes diagnosed 6-24 months previously (n = 789) into a second cohort study (cohort 2, diabetes). Follow-up examinations took place at similar to 18 months (both cohorts) and at similar to 48 months (cohort 1) or similar to 36 months (cohort 2) after baseline examinations. The cohorts were studied in parallel using matched protocols across seven clinical centres in northern Europe.Results: Using ADA 2011 glycaemic categories, 33% (n = 693) of cohort 1 (prediabetes risk) had normal glucose regulation and 67% (n = 1419) had impaired glucose regulation. Seventy-six per cent of participants in cohort 1 was male. Cohort 1 participants had the following characteristics (mean +/- SD) at baseline: age 62 (6.2) years; BMI 27.9 (4.0) kg/m(2); fasting glucose 5.7 (0.6) mmol/l; 2 h glucose 5.9 (1.6) mmol/l. At the final follow-up examination the participants' clinical characteristics were as follows: fasting glucose 6.0 (0.6) mmol/l; 2 h OGTT glucose 6.5 (2.0) mmol/l. In cohort 2 (diabetes), 66% (n = 517) were treated by lifestyle modification and 34% (n = 272) were treated with metformin plus lifestyle modification at enrolment. Fifty-eight per cent of participants in cohort 2 was male. Cohort 2 participants had the following characteristics at baseline: age 62 (8.1) years; BMI 30.5 (5.0) kg/m(2); fasting glucose 7.2 (1.4) mmol/l; 2 h glucose 8.6 (2.8) mmol/l. At the final follow-up examination, the participants' clinical characteristics were as follows: fasting glucose 7.9 (2.0) mmol/l; 2 h mixed-meal tolerance test glucose 9.9 (3.4) mmol/l.Conclusions/interpretation: The IMI DIRECT cohorts are intensely characterised, with a wide-variety of metabolically relevant measures assessed prospectively. We anticipate that the cohorts, made available through managed access, will provide a powerful resource for biomarker discovery, multivariate aetiological analyses and reclassification of patients for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.
  •  
10.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-10 av 25
  • [1]23Nästa
Typ av publikation
tidskriftsartikel (25)
Typ av innehåll
refereegranskat (25)
Författare/redaktör
Tura, Andrea (18)
Murray, Christopher ... (14)
Pacini, Giovanni (11)
Ahrén, Bo (10)
Coates, Matthew M. (10)
Mari, Andrea (9)
visa fler...
Charlson, Fiona J. (9)
Hankey, Graeme J. (8)
Gething, Peter W. (8)
Bensenor, Isabela M. (8)
Farvid, Maryam S. (8)
Jonas, Jost B. (8)
Kumar, G. Anil (8)
Lopez, Alan D. (8)
Miller, Ted R. (8)
Mokdad, Ali H. (8)
Sepanlou, Sadaf G. (8)
Uthman, Olalekan A. (8)
Amare, Azmeraw T. (8)
Bennett, Derrick A. (8)
Ciobanu, Liliana G. (8)
Dharmaratne, Samath ... (8)
Sanabria, Juan R. (8)
Santos, Itamar S. (8)
Singh, Jasvinder A. (8)
Tabares-Seisdedos, R ... (8)
Norheim, Ole F (8)
Hoy, Damian G. (8)
Koul, Parvaiz A. (8)
Antonio, Carl Abelar ... (8)
Breitborde, Nicholas ... (8)
Butt, Zahid A. (8)
Cárdenas, Rosario (8)
Faro, Andre (8)
Meretoja, Tuomo J. (8)
Schwebel, David C. (8)
Sreeramareddy, Chand ... (8)
Sykes, Bryan L. (8)
Weintraub, Robert G. (8)
Younis, Mustafa Z. (8)
Abu-Raddad, Laith J (8)
Catalá-López, Ferrán (8)
Alla, Francois (8)
Wolfe, Charles D A (8)
Karch, Andre (8)
Memish, Ziad A. (8)
Abbas, Kaja M. (8)
Barber, Ryan M. (8)
Casey, Daniel C. (8)
Ding, Eric L. (8)
visa färre...
Lärosäte
Lunds universitet (13)
Uppsala universitet (8)
Högskolan Dalarna (5)
Umeå universitet (3)
Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (3)
Göteborgs universitet (1)
visa fler...
Örebro universitet (1)
Södertörns högskola (1)
visa färre...
Språk
Engelska (25)
Forskningsämne (UKÄ/SCB)
Medicin och hälsovetenskap (25)

År

Kungliga biblioteket hanterar dina personuppgifter i enlighet med EU:s dataskyddsförordning (2018), GDPR. Läs mer om hur det funkar här.
Så här hanterar KB dina uppgifter vid användning av denna tjänst.

 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy