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Sökning: WFRF:(Ullén Susann)

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1.
  • Dankiewicz, J., et al. (författare)
  • Hypothermia versus Normothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: New England Journal of Medicine. - : MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL SOC. - 0028-4793 .- 1533-4406. ; 384:24, s. 2283-2294
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Hypothermia or Normothermia after Cardiac Arrest This trial randomly assigned patients with coma after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to undergo targeted hypothermia at 33 degrees C or normothermia with treatment of fever. At 6 months, there were no significant between-group differences regarding death or functional outcomes. Background Targeted temperature management is recommended for patients after cardiac arrest, but the supporting evidence is of low certainty. Methods In an open-label trial with blinded assessment of outcomes, we randomly assigned 1900 adults with coma who had had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac or unknown cause to undergo targeted hypothermia at 33 degrees C, followed by controlled rewarming, or targeted normothermia with early treatment of fever (body temperature, >= 37.8 degrees C). The primary outcome was death from any cause at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included functional outcome at 6 months as assessed with the modified Rankin scale. Prespecified subgroups were defined according to sex, age, initial cardiac rhythm, time to return of spontaneous circulation, and presence or absence of shock on admission. Prespecified adverse events were pneumonia, sepsis, bleeding, arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise, and skin complications related to the temperature management device. Results A total of 1850 patients were evaluated for the primary outcome. At 6 months, 465 of 925 patients (50%) in the hypothermia group had died, as compared with 446 of 925 (48%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.14; P=0.37). Of the 1747 patients in whom the functional outcome was assessed, 488 of 881 (55%) in the hypothermia group had moderately severe disability or worse (modified Rankin scale score >= 4), as compared with 479 of 866 (55%) in the normothermia group (relative risk with hypothermia, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.09). Outcomes were consistent in the prespecified subgroups. Arrhythmia resulting in hemodynamic compromise was more common in the hypothermia group than in the normothermia group (24% vs. 17%, P<0.001). The incidence of other adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions In patients with coma after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, targeted hypothermia did not lead to a lower incidence of death by 6 months than targeted normothermia. (Funded by the Swedish Research Council and others; TTM2 ClinicalTrials.gov number, .)
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2.
  • Dankiewicz, J., et al. (författare)
  • Targeted hypothermia versus targeted Normothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM2): A randomized clinical trial - Rationale and design
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: American Heart Journal. - : Mosby. - 0002-8703 .- 1097-6744. ; 217, s. 23-31
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Less than 500 participants have been included in randomized trials comparing hypothermia with regular care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, and many of these trials were small and at a high risk of bias. Consequently, the accrued data on this potentially beneficial intervention resembles that of a drug following small phase II trials. A large confirmatory trial is therefore warranted. Methods: The TTM2-trial is an international, multicenter, parallel group, investigator-initiated, randomized, superiority trial in which a target temperature of 33°C after cardiac arrest will be compared with a strategy to maintain normothermia and early treatment of fever (≥37.8°C). Participants will be randomized within 3 hours of return of spontaneous circulation with the intervention period lasting 40 hours in both groups. Sedation will be mandatory for all patients throughout the intervention period. The clinical team involved with direct patient care will not be blinded to allocation group due to the inherent difficulty in blinding the intervention. Prognosticators, outcome-assessors, the steering group, the trial coordinating team, and trial statistician will be blinded. The primary outcome will be all-cause mortality at 180 days after randomization. We estimate a 55% mortality in the control group. To detect an absolute risk reduction of 7.5% with an alpha of 0.05 and 90% power, 1900 participants will be enrolled. The main secondary neurological outcome will be poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale 4–6) at 180 days after arrest. Discussion: The TTM2-trial will compare hypothermia to 33°C with normothermia and early treatment of fever (≥37.8°C) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. © 2019
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3.
  • Ebner, Florian, et al. (författare)
  • The association of partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide with neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest : an explorative International Cardiac Arrest Registry 2.0 study
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. - : BioMed Central (BMC). - 1757-7241. ; 28:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Exposure to extreme arterial partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2) following the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is common and may affect neurological outcome but results of previous studies are conflicting. METHODS: Exploratory study of the International Cardiac Arrest Registry (INTCAR) 2.0 database, including 2162 OHCA patients with ROSC in 22 intensive care units in North America and Europe. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to extreme PaO2 or PaCO2 values within 24 h after OHCA is associated with poor neurological outcome at discharge. Our primary analyses investigated the association between extreme PaO2 and PaCO2 values, defined as hyperoxemia (PaO2 > 40 kPa), hypoxemia (PaO2 < 8.0 kPa), hypercapnemia (PaCO2 > 6.7 kPa) and hypocapnemia (PaCO2 < 4.0 kPa) and neurological outcome. The secondary analyses tested the association between the exposure combinations of PaO2 > 40 kPa with PaCO2 < 4.0 kPa and PaO2 8.0-40 kPa with PaCO2 > 6.7 kPa and neurological outcome. To define a cut point for the onset of poor neurological outcome, we tested a model with increasing and decreasing PaO2 levels and decreasing PaCO2 levels. Cerebral Performance Category (CPC), dichotomized to good (CPC 1-2) and poor (CPC 3-5) was used as outcome measure. RESULTS: Of 2135 patients eligible for analysis, 700 were exposed to hyperoxemia or hypoxemia and 1128 to hypercapnemia or hypocapnemia. Our primary analyses did not reveal significant associations between exposure to extreme PaO2 or PaCO2 values and neurological outcome (P = 0.13-0.49). Our secondary analyses showed no significant associations between combinations of PaO2 and PaCO2 and neurological outcome (P = 0.11-0.86). There was no PaO2 or PaCO2 level significantly associated with poor neurological outcome. All analyses were adjusted for relevant co-variates. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to extreme PaO2 or PaCO2 values in the first 24 h after OHCA was common, but not independently associated with neurological outcome at discharge.
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4.
  • Heimburg, K., et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity after cardiac arrest; protocol of a sub-study in the Targeted Hypothermia versus Targeted Normothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest trial (TTM2)
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Resuscitation Plus. - : Elsevier. - 2666-5204. ; 5
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims: The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors have lower levels of self-reported physical activity compared to a non-cardiac arrest (CA) control group who had acute myocardial infarction (MI). Additional aims are to explore potential predictors of physical inactivity (older age, female gender, problems with general physical function, global cognition, mental processing speed/attention, anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms, kinesiophobia, fatigue), and to investigate the relationship between self-reported and objectively measured physical activity among OHCA-survivors. Methods: The Targeted Hypothermia versus Targeted Normothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest trial (TTM2-trial) collects information regarding age, gender, self-reported physical activity, general physical function, global cognition and mental processing speed/attention at 6 months after OHCA. In this TTM2-trial cross-sectional prospective sub-study, participants at selected sites are invited to an additional follow-up meeting within 4 weeks from the main study follow-up. At this meeting, information regarding anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms, kinesiophobia and fatigue is collected. The OHCA-survivors are then provided with an objective measure of physical activity, a hip-placed accelerometer, to wear for one week, together with a training diary. At the end of the week, participants are asked to once again answer two self-reported questions regarding physical activity for that specific week. MI-controls attend a single follow-up meeting and perform the same assessments as the OHCA-survivors, except from wearing the accelerometer. We aim to include 110 OHCA-survivors and 110 MI-controls in Sweden, Denmark and the United Kingdom. Conclusion: The results from this sub-study will provide novel information about physical activity among OHCA-survivors.
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5.
  • Jakobsen, Janus Christian, et al. (författare)
  • Targeted hypothermia versus targeted normothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a statistical analysis plan.
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Trials. - : BioMed Central (BMC). - 1745-6215. ; 21:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To date, targeted temperature management (TTM) is the only neuroprotective intervention after resuscitation from cardiac arrest that is recommended by guidelines. The evidence on the effects of TTM is unclear.The Targeted Hypothermia Versus Targeted Normothermia After Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (TTM2) trial is an international, multicentre, parallel group, investigator-initiated, randomised, superiority trial in which TTM with a target temperature of 33 °C after cardiac arrest will be compared with a strategy to maintain normothermia and active treatment of fever (≥ 37.8 °C). Prognosticators, outcome assessors, the steering group, the trial coordinating team, and trial statisticians will be blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome will be all-cause mortality at 180 days after randomisation. We estimate a 55% mortality in the targeted normothermia group. To detect an absolute risk reduction of 7.5% with an alpha of 0.05 and 90% power, 1900 participants will be enrolled. The secondary neurological outcome will be poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale 4-6) at 180 days after cardiac arrest. In this paper, a detailed statistical analysis plan is presented, including a comprehensive description of the statistical analyses, handling of missing data, and assessments of underlying statistical assumptions. Final analyses will be conducted independently by two qualified statisticians following the present plan.This SAP, which was prepared before completion of enrolment, should increase the validity of the TTM trial by mitigation of analysis-bias.
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6.
  • Lilja, Gisela, et al. (författare)
  • Protocol for outcome reporting and follow-up in the Targeted Hypothermia versus Targeted Normothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest trial (TTM2)
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Resuscitation. - : Elsevier. - 0300-9572 .- 1873-1570. ; 150, s. 104-112
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims: The TTM2-trial is a multi-centre randomised clinical trial where targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 °C will be compared with normothermia and early treatment of fever (≥37.8 °C) after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA). This paper presents the design and rationale of the TTM2-trial follow-up, where information on secondary and exploratory outcomes will be collected. We also present the explorative outcome analyses which will focus on neurocognitive function and societal participation in OHCA-survivors. Methods: Blinded outcome-assessors will perform follow-up at 30-days after the OHCA with a telephone interview, including the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE). Face-to-face meetings will be performed at 6 and 24-months, and include reports on outcome from several sources of information: clinician-reported: mRS, GOSE; patient-reported: EuroQol-5 Dimensions-5 Level responses version (EQ-5D-5L), Life satisfaction, Two Simple Questions; observer-reported: Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly-Cardiac Arrest version (IQCODE-CA) and neurocognitive performance measures: Montreal Cognitive Assessment, (MoCA), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). Exploratory analyses will be performed with an emphasis on brain injury in the survivors, where the two intervention groups will be compared for potential differences in neuro-cognitive function (MoCA, SDMT) and societal participation (GOSE). Strategies to increase inter-rater reliability and decrease missing data are described. Discussion: The TTM2-trial follow-up is a pragmatic yet detailed pre-planned and standardised assessment of patient's outcome designed to ensure data-quality, decrease missing data and provide optimal conditions to investigate clinically relevant effects of TTM, including OHCA-survivors’ neurocognitive function and societal participation.
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7.
  • Moseby-Knappe, M., et al. (författare)
  • Serum markers of brain injury can predict good neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Intensive Care Medicine. - : Springer. - 0342-4642.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Purpose The majority of unconscious patients after cardiac arrest (CA) do not fulfill guideline criteria for a likely poor outcome, their prognosis is considered "indeterminate". We compared brain injury markers in blood for prediction of good outcome and for identifying false positive predictions of poor outcome as recommended by guidelines. Methods Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected serum samples at 24, 48 and 72 h post arrest within the Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM)-trial. Clinically available markers neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100B, and novel markers neurofilament light chain (NFL), total tau, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were analysed. Normal levels with a priori cutoffs specified by reference laboratories or defined from literature were used to predict good outcome (no to moderate disability, Cerebral Performance Category scale 1-2) at 6 months. Results Seven hundred and seventeen patients were included. Normal NFL, tau and GFAP had the highest sensitivities (97.2-98% of poor outcome patients had abnormal serum levels) and NPV (normal levels predicted good outcome in 87-95% of patients). Normal S100B and NSE predicted good outcome with NPV 76-82.2%. Normal NSE correctly identified 67/190 (35.3%) patients with good outcome among those classified as "indeterminate outcome" by guidelines. Five patients with single pathological prognostic findings despite normal biomarkers had good outcome. Conclusion Low levels of brain injury markers in blood are associated with good neurological outcome after CA. Incorporating biomarkers into neuroprognostication may help prevent premature withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy.
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8.
  • Zindovic, Igor, et al. (författare)
  • Recombinant factor VIIa use in acute type A aortic dissection repair : A multicenter propensity-score-matched report from the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. - : Mosby. - 0022-5223 .- 1097-685X. ; 154:6, s. 2-1859
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Surgery for acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is often complicated by excessive bleeding. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) effectively treats refractory bleeding associated with ATAAD surgery; however, adverse effects of rFVIIa in these patients have not been fully assessed. Here we evaluated rFVIIa treatment in ATAAD surgery using the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD) database. Methods: This was a multicenter, propensity score-matched, retrospective study. Information about rFVIIa use was available for 761 patients, of whom 171 were treated with rFVIIa. We successfully matched 120 patients treated with rFVIIa with 120 controls. Primary endpoints were in-hospital mortality, postoperative stroke, and renal replacement therapy (RRT). Survival data were presented using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Compared with controls, patients treated with rFVIIa received more transfusions of packed red blood cells (median, 9.0 U [4.0-17.0 U] vs 5.0 U [2.0-11.0 U]; P = .008), platelets (4.0 U [2.0-8.0 U] vs 2.0 U [1.0-4.4 U]; P <.001), and fresh frozen plasma (8.0 U [4.0-18.0 U] vs 5.5 U [2.0-10.3 U]; P = .01) underwent reexploration for bleeding more often (31.0% vs 16.8%; P = .014); and had greater 24-hour chest tube output (1500 L [835-2500 mL] vs 990 mL [520-1720 mL]). Treatment with rFVIIa was not associated with significantly increased rates of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-1.55; P = .487), postoperative stroke (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 0.82-3.91; P = .163), or RRT (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.48-2.92; P = .839). Conclusions: In this propensity-matched cohort study of patients undergoing ATAAD surgery, treatment with rFVIIa for major bleeding was not associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke, RRT, or mortality.
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10.
  • Backman, Sofia, et al. (författare)
  • Electroencephalographic characteristics of status epilepticus after cardiac arrest
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Clinical Neurophysiology. - : Elsevier. - 1388-2457. ; 128:4, s. 681-688
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: To describe the electrophysiological characteristics and pathophysiological significance of electrographic status epilepticus (ESE) after cardiac arrest and specifically compare patients with unequivocal ESE to patients with rhythmic or periodic borderline patterns defined as possible ESE. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients treated with targeted temperature management and monitored with simplified continuous EEG. Patients with ESE were identified and electrographically characterised until 72. h after ESE start using the standardised terminology of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Results: ESE occurred in 41 of 127 patients and 22 fulfilled the criteria for unequivocal ESE, which typically appeared early and transiently. Three of the four survivors had unequivocal ESE, starting after rewarming from a continuous background. There were no differences between the groups of unequivocal ESE and possible ESE regarding outcome, neuron-specific enolase levels or prevalence of reported clinical convulsions. Conclusion: ESE is common after cardiac arrest. The distinction between unequivocal and possible ESE patterns was not reflected by differences in clinical features or survival. Significance: A favourable outcome is seen infrequently in patients with ESE, regardless of using strict or liberal ESE definitions.
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