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Sökning: WFRF:(Wade TD)

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  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)
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  • Johnson, Shevaugn, et al. (författare)
  • Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism : Targeting dysmorphic concern
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Body image. - : Elsevier. - 1740-1445 .- 1873-6807. ; 30, s. 44-55
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Perfectionism is an important transdiagnostic risk factor for several psychopathologies. As such, treatments targeting perfectionism have gained increased attention over recent years. While perfectionism is postulated to be an important underlying mechanism for dysmorphic concern, no research has explored the benefits of targeting perfectionism to reduce dysmorphic concern. The current study evaluated the use of Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism (ICBT-P) with 31 participants (28 women) with high levels of dysmorphic concern to examine the impact on perfectionism, dysmorphic concern, body image disturbance, negative affect, and selective attention towards appearance-based stimuli. Using a case series design, observations were collected at baseline, at the end of a 4-week pre-treatment phase, after the 8-week ICBT-P, and 1-month post-treatment. Intent-to-treat analyses showed significant improvement from baseline to end-of-treatment and follow-up on most of the variables, with a large effect size decrease in dysmorphic concern, and decreased selective attention to BDD-body, BDD-positive, and BDD-negative words. The results of this study support the use of ICBT-P as an efficacious treatment worthy of further examination in populations who experience high levels of dysmorphic concern.
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  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)
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  • Munn-Chernoff, M. A., et al. (författare)
  • Shared genetic risk between eating disorder- and substance-use-related phenotypes: Evidence from genome-wide association studies
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Addiction Biology. - 1355-6215 .- 1369-1600.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Eating disorders and substance use disorders frequently co-occur. Twin studies reveal shared genetic variance between liabilities to eating disorders and substance use, with the strongest associations between symptoms of bulimia nervosa and problem alcohol use (genetic correlation [r(g)], twin-based = 0.23-0.53). We estimated the genetic correlation between eating disorder and substance use and disorder phenotypes using data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Four eating disorder phenotypes (anorexia nervosa [AN], AN with binge eating, AN without binge eating, and a bulimia nervosa factor score), and eight substance-use-related phenotypes (drinks per week, alcohol use disorder [AUD], smoking initiation, current smoking, cigarettes per day, nicotine dependence, cannabis initiation, and cannabis use disorder) from eight studies were included. Significant genetic correlations were adjusted for variants associated with major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. Total study sample sizes per phenotype ranged from similar to 2400 to similar to 537 000 individuals. We used linkage disequilibrium score regression to calculate single nucleotide polymorphism-based genetic correlations between eating disorder- and substance-use-related phenotypes. Significant positive genetic associations emerged between AUD and AN (r(g) = 0.18; false discovery rate q = 0.0006), cannabis initiation and AN (r(g) = 0.23; q < 0.0001), and cannabis initiation and AN with binge eating (r(g) = 0.27; q = 0.0016). Conversely, significant negative genetic correlations were observed between three nondiagnostic smoking phenotypes (smoking initiation, current smoking, and cigarettes per day) and AN without binge eating (r(gs) = -0.19 to -0.23; qs < 0.04). The genetic correlation between AUD and AN was no longer significant after co-varying for major depressive disorder loci. The patterns of association between eating disorder- and substance-use-related phenotypes highlights the potentially complex and substance-specific relationships among these behaviors.
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  • Rozental, Alexander, et al. (författare)
  • Guided web-based cognitive behavior therapy for perfectionism : Results from two different randomized controlled trials
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research. - : JMIR PUBLICATIONS, INC. - 1438-8871 .- 1438-8871. ; 20:4
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Perfectionism can become a debilitating condition that may negatively affect functioning in multiple areas, including mental health. Prior research has indicated that internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy can be beneficial, but few studies have included follow-up data.Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the outcomes at follow-up of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy with guided self-help, delivered as 2 separate randomized controlled trials conducted in Sweden and the United Kingdom.Methods: In total, 120 participants randomly assigned to internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy were included in both intention-to-treat and completer analyses: 78 in the Swedish trial and 62 in the UK trial. The primary outcome measure was the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Concern over Mistakes subscale (FMPS CM). Secondary outcome measures varied between the trials and consisted of the Clinical Perfectionism Questionnaire (CPQ; both trials), the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9; Swedish trial), the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7; Swedish trial), and the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21; UK trial). Follow-up occurred after 6 months for the UK trial and after 12 months for the Swedish trial.Results: Analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between pretreatment and follow-up in both studies. Intention-to-treat within-group Cohen d effect sizes were 1.21 (Swedish trial; 95% CI 0.86-1.54) and 1.24 (UK trial; 95% CI 0.85-1.62) for the FMPS CM. Furthermore, 29 (59%; Swedish trial) and 15 (43%; UK trial) of the participants met the criteria for recovery on the FMPS CM. Improvements were also significant for the CPQ, with effect sizes of 1.32 (Swedish trial; 95% CI 0.97-1.66) and 1.49 (UK trial; 95% CI 1.09-1.88); the PHQ-9, effect size 0.60 (95% CI 0.28-0.92); the GAD-7, effect size 0.67 (95% CI 0.34-0.99); and the DASS-21, effect size 0.50 (95% CI 0.13-0.85).Conclusions: The results are promising for the use of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy as a way of targeting perfectionism, but the findings need to be replicated and include a comparison condition.
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  • Shafran, Roz, et al. (författare)
  • Is the devil in the detail? A randomised controlled trial of guided internet-based CBT for perfectionism
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Behaviour Research and Therapy. - : PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD. - 0005-7967 .- 1873-622X. ; 95, s. 99-106
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • An Internet guided self-help cognitive-behavioural treatment (ICBT) for perfectionism was recently found to be effective (see this issue). Such studies stand in need of replication. The aim of this study was to report the outcomes and predictors of change when the treatment is delivered in a UK setting. A total of 120 people (Mean = 28.9 years; 79% female) were randomised to receive ICBT or wait-list control over 12 weeks (trial registration: NCT02756871). While there were strong similarities between the current study and its Swedish counterpart, there were also important differences in procedural details. There was a significant impact of the intervention on the primary outcome measure (Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Concern over Mistakes subscale) and also on the Clinical Perfectionism Questionnaire (between group effect sizes d = 0.98 (95% CI: 0.60-1.36) and d = 1.04 (95% CI: 0.66-1.43) respectively using intent-to-treat analyses). Unlike the Swedish study, there was significant non engagement and non-completion of modules with 71% of participants completing fewer than half the modules. The number of modules completed moderated the rate of change in clinical perfectionism over time. In conclusion, the study indicates the intervention is effective in a UK setting but highlighted the importance of procedural details to optimise retention. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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