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Sökning: WFRF:(Zheng Guoqiao)

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1.
  • Chattopadhyay, Subhayan, et al. (författare)
  • Prostate cancer survivors : Risk and mortality in second primary cancers
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Cancer Medicine. - Wiley-Blackwell. - 2045-7634. ; 7:11, s. 5752-5759
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To assess etiological and clinical consequences of second primary cancers (SPCs) in prostate cancer (PC) patients, we followed newly diagnosed patients to identify men who were diagnosed with a SPC and recorded their causes of death. We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to assess relative risks (RRs) and causes of death in SPCs until the year 2015 in patients with a PC diagnosis between 2001 and 2010. Among a total of 4.26 million men, 76 614 were diagnosed with PC at the median age of 71 years. Among them, 8659 (11.3%) received a subsequent diagnosis of SPC after a median follow-up of 4 years. The most common SPCs were colorectal, skin, bladder, and lung cancers, melanoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The ranking was almost identical with first cancers among elderly men in Sweden. The RR for SPCs in prostate-specific antigen—detected PC was approximately equal to RR in other PC. Mortality patterns of PC patients were distinct depending on the presence or absence of SPC. Among patients with SPC, 47.8% died as a result of the corresponding SPC, followed by other causes (22.2%) and PC (18.1%). For patients without SPC, PC and non-neoplastic causes almost matched each other as the main causes of death (48.5% and 47.8%). The results suggest that SPCs appear autonomous from primary PC and reflect incidence and mortality of first cancers in general. SPC was the most common cause of death in patients with SPC; close to half of the patients died due to SPC. For improved survival in PC patients, prevention and early detection of SPCs would be important, and the present results suggest that risk factors for SPC in PC are the same as those for first cancer in general.
2.
  • Chattopadhyay, Subhayan, et al. (författare)
  • Risk of second primary cancer following myeloid neoplasia and risk of myeloid neoplasia as second primary cancer : a nationwide, observational follow up study in Sweden
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: The Lancet Haematology. - Elsevier. - 2352-3026. ; 5:8, s. 368-377
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Although advances in the treatment of myeloid neoplasms have led to improved patient survival, this improvement has been accompanied by an increased risk of second primary cancer (ie, the risk of another cancer after myeloid neoplasia). We aimed to assess bi-directional associations between myeloid cancers and other cancers—ie, development of second primary cancer in patients who have previously had myeloid cancer, and risks of myeloid neoplasia in patients who have previously had another cancer—to provide insight into possible mechanisms beyond side-effects of treatment and shared risk factors. Methods: Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified 35 928 individuals with primary myeloid cancer, including myeloproliferative neoplasms, acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome diagnosed between 1958 and 2015. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes every individual registered as a resident in Sweden starting in 1932, with full parental history. The primary endpoint was the assessment of relative risks (RRs) for second primary cancer, which we performed using means of incidence rate ratios, regressed over a generalised Poisson model. Findings: Between 1958 and 2015, overall relative risk of second primary cancers was significantly increased after acute myeloid leukaemia (RR 1·29, 95% CI 1·17–1·41), chronic myeloid leukaemia (1·52, 1·35–1·69), myelodysplastic syndrome (1·42, 1·26–1·59), and all myeloproliferative neoplasms (1·37, 1·30–1·43) relative to the incidence of these cancers as first primary cancer. With myeloid neoplasia as a second primary cancer, risks were significantly increased for acute myeloid leukaemia (1·57, 1·48–1·65), chronic myeloid leukaemia (1·26, 1·13–1·40), and myelodysplastic syndrome (1·54, 1·42–1·67) relative to the incidence of these myeloid neoplasms as first primary cancers. Relative risk of upper aerodigestive tract cancer, squamous cell skin cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma as second primary cancers were increased after all four types of myeloid neoplasia relative to their incidence as first primary cancers. High risks of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia as second primary cancers were found after haematological cancers (RRs between 5·08 and 10·04). Interpretation: The relative risks of second primary cancer are important for the long-term management of patients with myeloid cancers. The bi-directional associations of myeloid cancers with many other cancers suggest a number of candidate mechanisms that might contribute to the development and aetiology of a second primary cancer. These mechanisms might include immune dysfunction or the effects of treatment, and these should be assessed in future investigations. Funding: Deutsche Krebshilfe, Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation, Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Finnish Cancer Organizations, Swedish Research Council, ALF from Region Skåne, and Bloodwise.
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3.
  • Chattopadhyay, Subhayan, et al. (författare)
  • Second primary cancers in non-Hodgkin lymphoma : Bidirectional analyses suggesting role for immune dysfunction
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0020-7136. ; 143:10, s. 2449-2457
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Second primary cancers (SPCs) account for an increasing proportion of all cancer diagnoses. It is unlikely that prior therapy is solely responsible for SPC risk. To investigate risk of SPC after diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and 10 of its subtypes we conducted a novel bidirectional analysis, SPCs after NHL and NHL as SPC. Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we identified 19,833 individuals with primary NHL diagnosed between 1993 and 2015. We calculated relative risks (RRs) of SPCs in NHL survivors and, for bi-directional analysis, risk of NHL as SPC. The overall RRs were significantly bidirectionally increased for NHL and 7 cancers. After diagnosis of NHL risks were increased for upper aerodigestive tract (RR = 1.96), colorectal (1.35), kidney (3.10), bladder (1.54) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCC) (4.12), melanoma (1.98) and Hodgkin lymphoma (9.38). The concordance between RRs for each bidirectional association between NHL and 31 different cancers was highly significant (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001). Melanoma was bidirectionally associated with all 10 subtypes of NHL. The observed bidirectional associations between NHL and cancer suggest that therapy-related carcinogenic mechanisms cannot solely explain the findings. Considering that skin SCC and melanoma are usually treated by surgery and that these cancers and NHL are most responsive of any cancer to immune suppression, the consistent bidirectional results provide population-level evidence that immune suppressed state is a key underlying mechanism in the context of SPCs. Furthermore, the quantified risks for NHL subtypes have direct clinical application in the management of NHL patients.
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4.
  • Chattopadhyay, Subhayan, et al. (författare)
  • Second primary cancers in non-Hodgkin lymphoma : Family history and survival
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0020-7136. ; 146:4, s. 970-976
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Second primary cancers (SPCs) account for an increasing proportion of all cancer diagnoses and family history of cancer may be a risk factor for SPCs. Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we assessed the influence of family history on risk of SPCs and of SPCs on survival. NHL patients were identified from the years 1958 to 2015 and generalized Poisson models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs) for SPCs and familial SPCs. Among 14,393 NHL patients, a total of 1,866 (13.0%) were diagnosed with SPC. Familial risk of nine particular cancers was associated with risks of these cancers as SPCs, with twofold to fivefold increase in RRs. At the end of a 25-year follow-up period, the survival probability for persons with SPC was only 20% of that for patients without SPC; the hazard ratio for SPC was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.46–1.72). Survival could be predicted by the prognostic groups based on first cancers and HRs increase systematically with worse prognosis yielding a trend of p = 4.6 × 10 −5 . SPCs had deleterious consequences for survival in NHL patients. Family history was associated with increasing numbers of SPCs. Prevention of SPCs and their early detection is an important target in the overall strategy to improve survival in NHL patients. Counseling for avoidance of risk factors and targeted screening based on family history are feasible steps in risk reduction.
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5.
  • Zhang, Luyao, et al. (författare)
  • Comparison of Familial Clustering of Anogenital and Skin Cancers Between In Situ and Invasive Types
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Scientific Reports. - Nature Publishing Group. - 2045-2322. ; 9:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Literature on familial risk of carcinomas in situ (CISs) is limited because many cancer registries do not collect information on CIS. In Sweden CISs are collected, and we used these data to analyze familial relative risks (RRs) for concordant (CIS-CIS) types of anogenital (cervical, other female and male genital and anal) and skin squamous cell CIS; additionally RRs were assessed between CIS types and between CIS and invasive forms. RRs were calculated for the offspring generations when family members were diagnosed CIS. Case numbers for CIS ranged from 330 in anal to 177,285 in cervical CIS. Significant concordant CIS-CIS RRs were 2.74 for female genital, 1.77 for cervical and 2.29 for SCC skin CISs. The CIS forms associated also with each other, except for cervical and skin CIS types. RRs for concordant CIS-invasive cancer associations were lower than CIS-CIS associations. Cervical CIS associated with non-Hodgkin CIS which may suggest immune dysfunction as a contributing factors. The results for anogenital CIS types suggest that life style related human papilloma virus infections contributed to the observed familial associations. Lower risks for CIS-invasive cancer than CIS-CIS suggest that CIS and invasive cancers share only partially risk factors that underlie familial clustering.
6.
  • Zhang, Luyao, et al. (författare)
  • Familial Clustering, Second Primary Cancers and Causes of Death in Penile, Vulvar and Vaginal Cancers
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Scientific Reports. - Nature Publishing Group. - 2045-2322. ; 9:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Data on familial risks in penile and vulvar/vaginal cancers and in second primary cancers (SPCs) following these cancers are limited. We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database from years 1958 through 2015 to identify 3641 penile and 8856 vulvar/vaginal cancers and to calculate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for these cancers according to site-specific cancer in family members; additionally risk for SPCs was calculated. The familial RR for concordant (same) penile cancer was 3.22 (1.34–7.74), and it was 2.72 (1.69–4.39) for vulvar/vaginal cancer; RRs were increased for vulvar/vaginal cancer in families of anal cancer patients. RR for second penile cancer after penile cancers was 11.68 (7.95–17.18), while that for concordant vulvar/vaginal cancer was 9.03 (7.31–11.15). SPCs were diagnosed in 16.8% of penile cancer patients and in them 45.9% of deaths were caused by SPC (other than penile cancer). In vulvar/vaginal cancer patients with SPC, 36.4% of deaths were due to SPC. The results showed that these genital cancers might run in families and as SPCs are associated with human papilloma virus and smoking related cancers. Risk for these genital and anal SPCs are high and a follow-up plan should be agreed at diagnosis of these cancers.
7.
  • Zhang, Luyao, et al. (författare)
  • Second cancers and causes of death in patients with testicular cancer in Sweden
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - Public Library of Science. - 1932-6203. ; 14:3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • While treatment for testicular cancer (TC) has become standardized after the 1980s with an associated significant improvement in patient survival, this has been accompanied by an increased risk of second primary cancers (SPCs). Patients were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry spanning the years from 1980 to 2015, including 8788 individuals with primary TC and their SPCs. Relative risks (RRs) for SPC were calculated using the generalized Poisson regression model. SPCs were diagnosed in 9.4% of patients with TC and half of them were late onset cancers not common in the population in their 40s. Overall RR of SPCs (excluding second TC) was 1.30 (95%CI: 1.20–1.40), including high risks for seven solid cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and leukemia. Second TC was the most common SPC and the RR of 17.19 (95%CI: 14.89–19.85) was the highest recorded. Cancers known to be fatal as first primary cancers were also fatal as SPC in TC patients. Survival at 30 years of follow-up was approximately 80% for TC patients without SPC but it decreased to 40% for patients with SPC. The unexpected finding that half of the identified SPCs were typical late onset cancers in the middle-aged population raises concerns that therapy may facilitate premature aging. The risks of SPC are clinically important for the long-term management of TC patients and the high-mortality calls for a future management strategy.
8.
  • Zheng, Guoqiao, et al. (författare)
  • Association between tumor characteristics and second primary cancers with cutaneous melanoma survival : A nationwide cohort study
  • ????
  • Ingår i: Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research. - Wiley-Blackwell. - 1755-1471.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The increased survival in malignant cutaneous melanoma (melanoma) is probably due to early diagnosis combined with improved treatment most recently. National health campaigns and screening programs for melanoma detection were started in Sweden several decades ago. We want to assess the influence of tumor characteristics, based on the TNM classification, and of second primary cancers on overall survival in melanoma. We used the Swedish Cancer Registry to assess all-cause survival in melanoma from 2003 to 2015. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using multivariable Cox regression models. A total of 19,773 melanoma patients were diagnosed with TNM data. Survival showed a strong improving trend over time (p-trend <.001). T1a was the most common classification (48.0% of all), while higher T class was associated systematically with worse survival (p-trend <.001). For distant metastases, the HR was 3.17, accounting for 0.9% of the patients. Any types of second primary cancers, other than melanoma, were associated with an HR of 2.00, accounted for 6.7% of all cases. Even if melanoma survival in Sweden ranks among the best national rates, the large percentage of patients with advanced tumors (T3b, T4a, and T4b, 17%) and 21% of deaths with T1a call for improved preventive and follow-up strategies.
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9.
  • Zheng, Guoqiao, et al. (författare)
  • Borderline Ovarian Tumors Share Familial Risks with Themselves and Invasive Cancers
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology. - American Association for Cancer Research. - 1538-7755. ; 27:11, s. 1358-1363
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) are a subgroup of ovarian malignancies with low malignant potential. Very limited earlier data are available on familial clustering of BOTs with other cancers. We aim to explore histology-specific familial associations among BOTs and associations between BOTs and any invasive cancers.Methods: On the basis of 16.1 million individuals in the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we estimated familial risks for overall or histology-specific patients with BOT considering both BOT and any invasive cancers in first-degree relatives (parents or siblings), as well as familial risks for invasive cancers considering family history of BOTs.Results: A total of 4,199 BOT cases were found in the offspring generation; among them, 34 (0.8%) cases had first-degree relatives diagnosed with any BOT, and 2,489 (59.3%) cases with any invasive cancers. A family history of BOT was associated with risks for all BOTs (RR = 2.20, P < 0.001). Papillary BOT in first-degree relatives was associated with the increased risk of having the same type of BOT (RR = 10.10, P < 0.001). BOTs showed familial associations with some invasive cancers, most consistently with colorectal, ovarian, pancreatic, lung, and bone cancers, and with leukemia. In histologic analyses, associations of BOT with even rare cancers of the anus, thyroid, and endocrine glands were noted.Conclusions: BOTs may share susceptibility with themselves and a number of invasive cancers.Impact: These results provide insight into familial associations of BOT for the first time, which may help with the etiologic mechanism and preventive strategy of BOTs, as well as the genetic counseling for patients with BOT. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(11); 1358-63.
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10.
  • Zheng, Guoqiao, et al. (författare)
  • Familial associations of female breast cancer with other cancers
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0020-7136. ; 141:11, s. 2253-2259
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Familial risks of breast cancer (BC) are well established but whether BC clusters with other, i.e. discordant, cancers is less certain but of interest for the identification of common genetic and possible environmental factors contributing to a general cancer susceptibility. We apply a novel approach to search for familial associations of BC with other (discordant) cancers based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Relative risks (RRs) were calculated for BC in families with increasing numbers of patients with discordant cancer X, and conversely, familial RRs for cancer X in families with increasing numbers of BC patients. Joint p-values were calculated from independent analyses. The total number of familial BCs was 12,266, 14.9% with one first-degree relative with BC and 1.2% with at least 2 affected relatives. Ovarian and prostate cancers showed the strongest associations with BC (p-value <10−11). The p-value for melanoma was <10−6, for stomach and male colorectal cancer <2.5 × 10−6, for cancer of unknown primary <2.5 × 10−5 and for lung cancer <5 × 10−5. Significance level <5 × 10−4 was reached with pancreatic cancer. The remaining associations (p < 0.0025) included thyroid, endometrial, testicular, eye cancers (uveal melanoma), nervous system and endocrine tumors and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The RR for BC increased by increasing numbers of patients with any cancer in family members and it reached 1.62 when three or more family members were affected. The results suggest that BC shares susceptibility with a number of other cancers. This might alert genetic counselors and challenge approaches for gene and gene–environment identification.
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