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Sökning: WFRF:(Ziegler Anette G)

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1.
  • Speliotes, Elizabeth K., et al. (författare)
  • Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1546-1718 .- 1061-4036. ; 42:11, s. 53-937
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and similar to 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 x 10(-8)), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation.
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3.
  • Bediaga, Naiara G, et al. (författare)
  • Simplifying prediction of disease progression in pre-symptomatic type 1 diabetes using a single blood sample
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Diabetologia. - : Springer. - 1432-0428.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Accurate prediction of disease progression in individuals with pre-symptomatic type 1 diabetes has potential to prevent ketoacidosis and accelerate development of disease-modifying therapies. Current tools for predicting risk require multiple blood samples taken during an OGTT. Our aim was to develop and validate a simpler tool based on a single blood draw.METHODS: Models to predict disease progression using a single OGTT time point (0, 30, 60, 90 or 120 min) were developed using TrialNet data collected from relatives with type 1 diabetes and validated in independent populations at high genetic risk of type 1 diabetes (TrialNet, Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1, The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young [1]) and in a general population of Bavarian children who participated in Fr1da.RESULTS: Cox proportional hazards models combining plasma glucose, C-peptide, sex, age, BMI, HbA1c and insulinoma antigen-2 autoantibody status predicted disease progression in all populations. In TrialNet, the AUC for receiver operating characteristic curves for models named M60, M90 and M120, based on sampling at 60, 90 and 120 min, was 0.760, 0.761 and 0.745, respectively. These were not significantly different from the AUC of 0.760 for the gold standard Diabetes Prevention Trial Risk Score, which requires five OGTT blood samples. In TEDDY, where only 120 min blood sampling had been performed, the M120 AUC was 0.865. In Fr1da, the M120 AUC of 0.742 was significantly greater than the M60 AUC of 0.615.CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Prediction models based on a single OGTT blood draw accurately predict disease progression from stage 1 or 2 to stage 3 type 1 diabetes. The operational simplicity of M120, its validity across different at-risk populations and the requirement for 120 min sampling to stage type 1 diabetes suggest M120 could be readily applied to decrease the cost and complexity of risk stratification.
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4.
  • Haghighi, Mona, et al. (författare)
  • A Comparison of Rule-based Analysis with Regression Methods in Understanding the Risk Factors for Study Withdrawal in a Pediatric Study
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Scientific Reports. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 2045-2322. ; 6
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Regression models are extensively used in many epidemiological studies to understand the linkage between specific outcomes of interest and their risk factors. However, regression models in general examine the average effects of the risk factors and ignore subgroups with different risk profiles. As a result, interventions are often geared towards the average member of the population, without consideration of the special health needs of different subgroups within the population. This paper demonstrates the value of using rule-based analysis methods that can identify subgroups with heterogeneous risk profiles in a population without imposing assumptions on the subgroups or method. The rules define the risk pattern of subsets of individuals by not only considering the interactions between the risk factors but also their ranges. We compared the rule-based analysis results with the results from a logistic regression model in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study. Both methods detected a similar suite of risk factors, but the rule-based analysis was superior at detecting multiple interactions between the risk factors that characterize the subgroups. A further investigation of the particular characteristics of each subgroup may detect the special health needs of the subgroup and lead to tailored interventions.
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5.
  • Hagopian, William A., et al. (författare)
  • TEDDY- The environmental determinants of diabetes in the young - An observational clinical trial
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 0077-8923. ; 1079, s. 320-326
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The aim of the TEDDY study is to identify infectious agents, dietary factors, or other environmental agents, including psychosocial factors, which may either trigger islet autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), or both. The study has two end points: (a) appearance of islet autoantibodies and (b) clinical diagnosis of T1DM. Six clinical centers screen newborns for high-risk HLA genotypes. As of December 2005 a total of 54,470 newborns have been screened. High-risk HLA genotypes among 53,560 general population (GP) infants were 2576 (4.8%) and among 910 newborns with a first-degree relative (FDR) were 194 (21%). A total of 1061 children have been enrolled. The initial enrollment results demonstrate the feasibility of this complex and demanding a prospective study.
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6.
  • Hummel, Sandra, et al. (författare)
  • First infant formula type and risk of islet autoimmunity in the environmental determinants of diabetes in the young (TEDDY) study
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Diabetes Care. - : American Diabetes Association. - 0149-5992. ; 40:3, s. 398-404
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE Studies on the introduction of infant formulas and its effect on the risk of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes (T1D) have yielded inconsistent results. We investigated whether the introduction of formula based on hydrolyzed cow'smilk as the first formula is associated with reduced islet autoimmunity risk in a large prospective cohort. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study prospectively monitors 8,676 children at increased genetic risk for T1D. Autoantibodies to insulin, GAD65, and IA2 were measured regularly to define islet autoimmunity. Information on formula feeding was collected by questionnaires at 3 months of age. RESULTS In survival analyses, after adjustment for family history with T1D, HLA genotype, sex, country, delivery mode, breast-feeding 3 months, and seasonality of birth, we observed no significant association with islet autoimmunity in infants who received extensively hydrolyzed compared with nonhydrolyzed cow'smilk-based formula as the first formula during the first 3 months (adjusted hazard ratio 1.38 [95% CI 0.95; 2.01]), and a significantly increased risk for extensively hydrolyzed formula introduced during the first 7 days (adjusted hazard ratio 1.57 [1.04; 2.38]). Using a partially hydrolyzed or other formula as the first formula, or no formula, was not associated with islet autoimmunity risk. CONCLUSIONS These results add to the existing evidence that islet autoimmunity risk is not reduced, and may be increased, by using hydrolyzed compared with nonhydrolyzed cow's milk-based infant formula as the first formula in infants at increased genetic risk for T1D .
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7.
  • Kemppainen, Kaisa M, et al. (författare)
  • Association Between Early-Life Antibiotic Use and the Risk of Islet or Celiac Disease Autoimmunity
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: JAMA Pediatrics. - : American Medical Association. - 2168-6211. ; 171:12, s. 1217-1225
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Importance: Evidence is lacking regarding the consequences of antibiotic use in early life and the risk of certain autoimmune diseases.Objective: To test the association between early-life antibiotic use and islet or celiac disease (CD) autoimmunity in genetically at-risk children prospectively followed up for type 1 diabetes (T1D) or CD.Design, Setting, and Participants: HLA-genotyped newborns from Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States were enrolled in the prospective birth cohort of The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study between November 20, 2004, and July 8, 2010. The dates of analysis were November 20, 2004, to August 31, 2014. Individuals from the general population and those having a first-degree relative with T1D were enrolled if they had 1 of 9 HLA genotypes associated with a risk for T1D.Exposures: Parental reports of the most common antibiotics (cephalosporins, penicillins, and macrolides) used between age 3 months and age 4 years were recorded prospectively.Main Outcomes and Measures: Islet autoimmunity and CD autoimmunity were defined as being positive for islet or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies at 2 consecutive clinic visits at least 3 months apart. Hazard ratios and 95% CIs calculated from Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the relationship between antibiotic use in early life before seroconversion and the development of autoimmunity.Results: Participants were 8495 children (49.0% female) and 6558 children (48.7% female) enrolled in the TEDDY study who were tested for islet and tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies, respectively. Exposure to and frequency of use of any antibiotic assessed in this study in early life or before seroconversion did not influence the risk of developing islet autoimmunity or CD autoimmunity. Cumulative use of any antibiotic during the first 4 years of life was not associated with the appearance of any autoantibody (hazard ratio [HR], 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95-1.01), multiple islet autoantibodies (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.95-1.03), or the transglutaminase autoantibody (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.98-1.02).Conclusions and Relevance: The use of the most prescribed antibiotics during the first 4 years of life, regardless of geographic region, was not associated with the development of autoimmunity for T1D or CD. These results suggest that a risk of islet or tissue transglutaminase autoimmunity need not influence the recommendations for clinical use of antibiotics in young children at risk for T1D or CD.
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8.
  • Krischer, Jeffrey P, et al. (författare)
  • Predicting Islet Cell Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes : An 8-Year TEDDY Study Progress Report
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Diabetes Care. - : American Diabetes Association. - 1935-5548. ; 42:6, s. 1051-1060
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: Assessment of the predictive power of The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY)-identified risk factors for islet autoimmunity (IA), the type of autoantibody appearing first, and type 1 diabetes (T1D).RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 7,777 children were followed from birth to a median of 9.1 years of age for the development of islet autoantibodies and progression to T1D. Time-dependent sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to provide estimates of their individual and collective ability to predict IA and T1D.RESULTS: HLA genotype (DR3/4 vs. others) was the best predictor for IA (Youden's index J = 0.117) and single nucleotide polymorphism rs2476601, in PTPN22, was the best predictor for insulin autoantibodies (IAA) appearing first (IAA-first) (J = 0.123). For GAD autoantibodies (GADA)-first, weight at 1 year was the best predictor (J = 0.114). In a multivariate model, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.678 (95% CI 0.655, 0.701), 0.707 (95% CI 0.676, 0.739), and 0.686 (95% CI 0.651, 0.722) for IA, IAA-first, and GADA-first, respectively, at 6 years. The AUC of the prediction model for T1D at 3 years after the appearance of multiple autoantibodies reached 0.706 (95% CI 0.649, 0.762).CONCLUSIONS: Prediction modeling statistics are valuable tools, when applied in a time-until-event setting, to evaluate the ability of risk factors to discriminate between those who will and those who will not get disease. Although significantly associated with IA and T1D, the TEDDY risk factors individually contribute little to prediction. However, in combination, these factors increased IA and T1D prediction substantially.
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9.
  • Krischer, Jeffrey P., et al. (författare)
  • The 6 year incidence of diabetes-associated autoantibodies in genetically at-risk children: the TEDDY study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Diabetologia. - : Springer. - 1432-0428. ; 58:5, s. 980-987
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims/hypothesis Islet autoantibodies, in addition to elevated blood glucose, define type 1 diabetes. These autoantibodies are detectable for a variable period of time before diabetes onset. Thus, the occurrence of islet autoantibodies is associated with the beginning of the disease process. The age at, and order in, which autoantibodies appear may be associated with different genetic backgrounds or environmental exposures, or both. Methods Infants with HLA-DR high-risk genotypes (DR3/4, DR4/4, DR4/8 and DR3/3) were enrolled and prospectively followed with standardised autoantibody assessments quarterly throughout the first 4 years of life and then semi-annually thereafter. Results Autoantibodies appeared in 549/8,503 (6.5%) children during 34,091 person-years of follow-up. Autoantibodies at 3 (0.1%) and 6 (0.2%) months of age were rare. Of the 549, 43.7% had islet autoantibodies to insulin (IAA) only, 37.7% had glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA) only, 13.8% had both GADA and IAA only, 1.6% had insulinoma antigen-2 only and 3.1% had other combinations. The incidence of IAA only peaked within the first year of life and declined over the following 5 years, but GADA only increased until the second year and remained relatively constant. GADA only were more common than IAA only in HLA-DR3/3 children but less common in HLA-DR4/8 children. Conclusions/interpretation Islet autoantibodies can occur very early in life and the order of appearance was related to HLA-DR-DQ genotype.
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10.
  • Lundgren, Markus, et al. (författare)
  • Analgesic antipyretic use among young children in the TEDDY study : No association with islet autoimmunity
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: BMC Pediatrics. - : BioMed Central (BMC). - 1471-2431. ; 17:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The use of analgesic antipyretics (ANAP) in children have long been a matter of controversy. Data on their practical use on an individual level has, however, been scarce. There are indications of possible effects on glucose homeostasis and immune function related to the use of ANAP. The aim of this study was to analyze patterns of analgesic antipyretic use across the clinical centers of The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) prospective cohort study and test if ANAP use was a risk factor for islet autoimmunity. Methods: Data were collected for 8542 children in the first 2.5 years of life. Incidence was analyzed using logistic regression with country and first child status as independent variables. Holm's procedure was used to adjust for multiplicity of intercountry comparisons. Time to autoantibody seroconversion was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model with cumulative analgesic use as primary time dependent covariate of interest. For each categorization, a generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach was used. Results: Higher prevalence of ANAP use was found in the U.S. (95.7%) and Sweden (94.8%) compared to Finland (78.1%) and Germany (80.2%). First-born children were more commonly given acetaminophen (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.07, 1.49; p = 0.007) but less commonly Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAID) (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.78, 0.95; p = 0.002). Acetaminophen and NSAID use in the absence of fever and infection was more prevalent in the U.S. (40.4%; 26.3% of doses) compared to Sweden, Finland and Germany (p < 0.001). Acetaminophen or NSAID use before age 2.5 years did not predict development of islet autoimmunity by age 6 years (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.99-1.09; p = 0.27). In a sub-analysis, acetaminophen use in children with fever weakly predicted development of islet autoimmunity by age 3 years (HR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09; p = 0.024). Conclusions: ANAP use in young children is not a risk factor for seroconversion by age 6 years. Use of ANAP is widespread in young children, and significantly higher in the U.S. compared to other study sites, where use is common also in absence of fever and infection.
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